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Karnalyte Resources Inc. - Wynyard Carnallite Project
 
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Karnalyte Resources Inc. is engaged in the business of exploration and development of high quality agricultural and industrial potash and magnesium products. Karnalyte intends to develop and extract a carnallite - sylvite mineral deposit through a known solution mining process at competitive costs and with minimal environmental impact.
Views: 2503 Karnalyte Resources
Solution Mining
 
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Here is my final project video on Solution Mining, ENJOY!
Views: 4286 Ryan Hamilton
Yancoal Canada - Southey Potash Project
 
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The Southey Project is a proposed Greenfield solution potash mine located approximately 60 km north of Regina, in the Rural Municipalities of Longlaketon and Cupar. The projected production capacity for the Southey Project is 2.8 million tonnes per year, and the life span of the project is estimated to be 65 to 100 years.
Views: 9068 Yancoal Canada
Carnallite
 
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Carnallite is an evaporite mineral, a hydrated potassium magnesium chloride with formula KMgCl3·6(H2O). It is variably colored yellow to white, reddish, and sometimes colorless or blue. It is usually massive to fibrous with rare pseudohexagonal orthorhombic crystals. The mineral is deliquescent (absorbs moisture from the surrounding air) and specimens must be stored in an airtight container. Carnallite occurs with a sequence of potassium and magnesium evaporite minerals: sylvite, kainite, picromerite, polyhalite, and kieserite. Carnallite is an uncommon double chloride mineral that only forms under specific environmental conditions in an evaporating sea or sedimentary basin. It is mined for both potassium and magnesium and occurs in the evaporite deposits of Carlsbad, New Mexico; the Paradox Basin in Colorado and Utah; Stassfurt, Germany; the Perm Basin, Russia; and the Williston Basin in Saskatchewan, Canada. These deposits date from the Devonian through the Permian Periods. In contrast, both Israel and Jordan produce potash from the Dead Sea by using evaporation pans to further concentrate the brine until carnallite precipitates, dredging the carnallite from the pans, and processing to remove the magnesium chloride from the potassium chloride. Carnallite was first described in 1856 from its type location of Stassfurt Deposit, Saxony-Anhalt, Germany. It was named for the Prussian mining engineer Rudolf von Carnall (1804–1874). Background Information Halides are binary compounds. They are composed of a halogen and a metal ion. The crystal chemistry of halides is characterized by the electronegativity of halogen ions. This means that the dominant large ions are the Cl−, Br−, F−, or I−. These are easily polarized. The ions combine with similarly large but low valence and weakly polarized cations. The cations are mostly of the alkali metal group. Sylvite is a binary compound with the formula KCl. Sylvite precipitates first from mixed solutions of K+, Mg+ and Cl−, leaving a brine enriched in magnesium from which the mixed halide carnallite then precipitates. Composition Carnallite’s chemical formula is KMgCl3·6(H2O). Synthetic carnallite crystal specimens can be produced from 1.5 mole percent KCl and 98.5 mole percent MgCl2·6H2O by slow crystallization at 25 °C. Its density is 1.602 g/cm3. Carnallite can also be produced by grinding the combination of hydrated magnesium chloride and potassium chloride.
Views: 1389 Century Old
evaporation salt mining
 
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salt -- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/youtube/ -- Create animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 206 chan tait
Global Economy and Health: UBC Seeks Solutions to Salt Mining Challenges
 
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"The technologies are the crudest of the crude." The University of British Columbia Engineering graduate, Jennifer Hinton, finds solutions for the developing world and hazards related to mining salt. Video by Bruce Marchfelder for the Faculty of Applied Science, The University of British Columbia Produced February 2012 Copyright: The University of British Columbia
Solvay Process
 
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Check out us at:http://chemistry.tutorvista.com Solvay Process The ammonia-soda process (also called as Ammonia solvay process), it is the most important industrial process for the manufacture of soda ash (sodium carbonate). The ammonia-soda process was industrialized into new form by Ernest Solvay during the year 1860s. The constituents used for this production are readily available and cheap, example salt brine and limestone. Ammonia Solvay process-based chemical plants now constructed about 3/4 of this deliver, with the rest being mined as of natural deposits. Please like our facebook page http://www.facebook.com/tutorvista Follow us at: https://plus.google.com/+tutorvista/
Views: 116627 TutorVista
Solution Mining 2e
 
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Views: 38 troilus
Khewra Salt Mine (Pull Sarat) Brine Pond
 
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Khewra Salt Mine (Pull Sarat) Brine Pond
Views: 441 HaadiaMumtaz
Potash Minerals ideal Play for efficient Solution Mining
 
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March 25, 2013 -- Ben Binninger, CEO, Potash Minerals Ltd. (ASX: POK) in an interview with Tracy Weslosky, Publisher of ProEdgeWire (ProEdgeWire.com) talked about Potash Mineral's 100,000 acre, solution mining, potash asset in Utah. Addressing the key issue of water supply, Mr. Binninger stated "We have enormous amounts of water below the ground that we can use for solution mining." Such access to water is an integral to a potash asset with an exploration target of 3 -- 5 billion tons. Operational and capital costs (OPEX & CAPEX) are important considerations for any mining project, especially potash. In this respect, Binninger is confident, noting that "...demand will grow and anyone who has the right location, the right product, is in the right market, will have a competitive advantage." Potash Minerals will also be able to take advantage of the fact that their deposit is sylvinite, which is the more desirable type of mineralization for potash in North America. Because sylvinite is easier to process, it will ensure the delivery of a higher quality potash that ultimately helps to offset costs often associated with other potash deposits, which require more processing to achieve anywhere near the desired potash quality. Disclaimer: Potash Minerals Ltd. is a member of ProEdgeWire.
Views: 643 InvestorIntel
What does carnallite mean?
 
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What does carnallite mean? A spoken definition of carnallite. Intro Sound: Typewriter - Tamskp Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Outro Music: Groove Groove - Kevin MacLeod (incompetech.com) Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Intro/Outro Photo: The best days are not planned - Marcus Hansson Licensed under CC-BY-2.0 Book Image: Open Book template PSD - DougitDesign Licensed under CC:BA 3.0 Text derived from: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/carnallite Text to Speech powered by TTS-API.COM
Digiscend, a solution for contractors within the mining industry
 
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For contractors who are entering Peru and Chile with their experience in the mining industry. Email us at [email protected] or call us directly to +51 959 502 518. We guarantee efficient and affordable exposure to your business.
Views: 546 Digiscend
Conceptual Potash Mine in Saskatchewan
 
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A conceptual overview of a conventional potash mine for APIs Burr Project in Saskatchewan. Created by Cinepost Films for Athabasca Potash Inc. http://www.athabascapotash.ca
Views: 19038 AthabascaPotash
What is Evaporite? | Evaporite Explained
 
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Evaporite is the term for a water-soluble mineral sediment that results from concentration and crystallization by evaporation from an aqueous solution.There are two types of evaporite deposits: marine, which can also be described as ocean deposits, and non-marine, which are found in standing bodies of water such as lakes. Evaporites are considered sedimentary rocks and are formed by chemical sediments. Formation of evaporite rocks: Although all water bodies on the surface and in aquifers contain dissolved salts, the water must evaporate into the atmosphere for the minerals to precipitate. For this to happen, the water body must enter a restricted environment where water input into this environment remains below the net rate of evaporation. This is usually an arid environment with a small basin fed by a limited input of water. When evaporation occurs, the remaining water is enriched in salts, and they precipitate when the water becomes supersaturated. Evaporite depositional environments: Marine evaporates: Marine evaporites tend to have thicker deposits and are usually the focus of more extensive research. They also have a system of evaporation. When scientists evaporate ocean water in a laboratory, the minerals are deposited in a defined order that was first demonstrated by Usiglio in 1884. The first phase of the experiment begins when about 50% of the original water depth remains. At this point, minor carbonates begin to form. The next phase in the sequence comes when the experiment is left with about 20% of its original level. At this point, the mineral gypsum begins to form, which is then followed by halite at 10%, excluding carbonate minerals that tend not to be evaporites. The most common minerals that are generally considered to be the most representative of marine evaporites are calcite, gypsum and anhydrite, halite, sylvite, carnallite, langbeinite, polyhalite, and kainite. Kieserite (MgSO4) may also be included, which often will make up less than four percent of the overall content.However, there are approximately 80 different minerals that have been reported found in evaporite deposits (Stewart,1963;Warren,1999), though only about a dozen are common enough to be considered important rock formers. ………………………………………………………………………………….. Sources: Text: Text of this video has been taken from Wikipedia; which is available under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike License …………………………………………………………………………………..
Views: 500 Free Audio Books
Into The New Potash Mine 2
 
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A delivery of steel into the new Potash Corporation of Saskatchewan mine at Penobsquis New Brunswick."http://www.yttrucking.com
Views: 8892 westsidemonster
Nedmag Industries
 
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www.nedmag.com - Nedmag produces high-quality dead burned magnesium oxide (DBM), magnesium chloride, calcium chloride en magnesium hydroxide. Our products are purchased for a wide range of applications. The most important of these are: the production of refractories to line cement en steel kilns, drilling fluids for the oil and gas industry, winter road maintenance and dust control on roads, and flame retardants in heat stabilisers for PVC products. But sectors that are particularly discerning when it comes to quality, such as the food industry, the cosmetic industry and the medical industry have discovered Nedmag as well. Nedmag products are sold in Europe, North America, the Middle East and Asia. Nedmag's success is largely due to the unique salt layer that, over the course of millions of years, has formed at a depth of 2000 meters in the north of the Netherlands. It contains magnesium salt of unparalleled purity. This enables us to produce very high-quality products. In fact, our magnesium chloride is so pure that it is used for cosmetic and medical applications, and is comparable to dead sea salt. Nedmag is an independent company with two production locations in the Netherlands: a mining location where magnesium chloride is extracted, and a production location at which the production of high-quality DBM and calcium chloride takes place. Today our company employs 140 people, all of whom are motivated by the desire to satisfy the varied demands of our customers. Our motto: getting you closer to perfection.
Views: 1167 Arnte van Dam
Halogen
 
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The halogens or halogen elements (/ˈhælɵdʒɨn/) are a group in the periodic table consisting of five chemically related elements: fluorine (F), chlorine (Cl), bromine (Br), iodine (I), and astatine (At). The artificially created element 117 (ununseptium) may also be a halogen. In the modern IUPAC nomenclature, this group is known as group 17. The group of halogens is the only periodic table group that contains elements in all three familiar states of matter at standard temperature and pressure. All of the halogens form acids when bonded to hydrogen. Most halogens are typically produced from minerals or salts. The middle halogens, that is, chlorine, bromine and iodine, are often used as disinfectants. The halogens are also all toxic. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 271 Audiopedia
Carnallite Market in China & World Research 2014
 
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2014 Deep Research Report on China Carnallite Industry @ http://www.reportsnreports.com/purchase.aspx?name=298263 Table of Contets Chapter One Carnallite Industry Overview Chapter Two Carnallite International and China Market Analysis Chapter Three Carnallite Industry Development Environmental Analysis Chapter Four Carnallite Development Policy and Plan Chapter Five Carnallite Manufacturing Process and Cost Structure Chapter Six 2009-2014 Carnallite Productions Supply Sales Demand Market Status and Forecast Chapter Seven Carnallite Key Manufacturers Analysis Chapter Eight Up and Down Stream Industry Analysis Chapter Nine Carnallite Marketing Channels Analysis Chapter Ten Carnallite Industry Development Trend Inquiry before buying @ http://www.reportsnreports.com/contacts/inquirybeforebuy.aspx?name=298263 . Contact [email protected] / Call +1 888 391 5441 for further information on “2014 Deep Research Report on China Carnallite Industry” report OR for any other market research and intelligence needs you may have for your business.
Views: 3 Saandyp P
How Chlorine is made | Things Chlorine is used to make | Uses & properties of element Chlorine Cl
 
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How Chlorine is made | Things Chlorine is used to make | Manufacturing uses & properties of Chemical element Chlorine Cl Chlorine is a chemical element with symbol Cl and atomic number 17. The second-lightest of the halogens, it appears between fluorine and bromine in the periodic table and its properties are mostly intermediate between them. Chlorine is commonly used as an antiseptic and is used to make drinking water safe and to treat swimming pools. Large amounts of chlorine are used in many industrial processes, such as in the production of paper products, plastics, dyes, textiles, medicines, antiseptics, insecticides, solvents and paints. Atomic number 17 Atomic mass 35.45 Group 17; Period 3; Block p Melting point -101.5°C, -150.7°F, 171.7 K Boiling point -34.04°C, -29.27°F, 239.11 K Chlorine is a yellow-green dense gas with a choking smell. Sodium chloride or ‘common salt’ is the main mineral that is mined for chlorine. Chlorine helps to keep the amount of fluid inside & outside of your cells in balance. Chlorine is found in the minerals Carnallite & Sylvite. Building & Construction industry for manufacturing vinyl windows. Chemical industry uses chlorine as an oxidising agent for substituting reactions Electrical industries to manufacture fast processors for all type of electronic devices and Food Industry to kill bacteria . Military for manufacture bullet-resistant vests, aircraft cockpit canopies and missile. Paint Industry for manufacturing durable paints. Pharmaceutical Industry for manufacturing medicines. Plastics industry uses chlorine for the syntheses of the plastic PVC. Pulp and paper industry uses chlorine to bleach their products. Textile industries use chlorine to bleach their products. Transportation industry for manufacturing of seat cushions, bumpers, brake fluid and airbags. Water industry for treating drinking water and swimming pool water. Chlorine kills bacteria – it is a disinfectant. It is used to treat drinking water and swimming pool water. It is also used to make hundreds of consumer products from paper to paints, and from textiles to insecticides. About 20% of chlorine produced is used to make PVC.
Views: 2207 Top Most 22
Intrepid Potash History
 
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Intrepid Mining was formed in January 2000 for the purpose of acquiring the Moab Mine from PCS. The Moab Mine was a solution mine which had experienced sustained declining production. Our management team stabilized production volumes substantially above the pre-acquisition level by applying horizontal drilling technology that is commonly used in the oil and gas industry but had never before been used to mine potash.
Views: 1396 IntrepidPotashVideos
Western Potash Corp. (TSXv: WPX) - Corporate Presentation (January 2011)
 
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Western Potash Corp. (TSXv: WPX) is a potash development company focused on building Canada's most efficient potash solution mine. After receiving a positive preliminary economic assessment for the Milestone Property, the company is proceeding towards a feasibility study.
Views: 782 ZimtuCapitalCorp
K+S Legacy Project Potash Mine
 
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Did you know that it’s possible to mine potash with simply the dissolving power of hot water? The K+S Legacy Project is the first new mine in Saskatchewan in more than 40 years, investing $4.1 billion into Saskatchewan’s economy. At times there are 1,800 people on site working on the construction of the K+S Legacy Project, however the overall workforce employs approximately 4,500 people. As the mine moves towards full operation it will produce 250 tonnes of potash per day with a target of 2 million tonnes by the end of 2017!
Views: 4831 Sask Wanderer
Monday? More like MINE DAY!
 
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This video is a submission for the SMA Digging Deeper Challenge that asks, "What will Saskatchewan mining look like in the next 50 years?". This is the bibliography of references: Environmentally Sensitive Green Mining. (n.d.). Retrieved March 12, 2015, from http://web.mit.edu/12.000/www/m2016/finalwebsite/solutions/greenmining.html Gianetta, J. (2011, July 1). Saskatchewan - Mineral Resources. Retrieved March 10, 2015, from http://www.aitc.sk.ca/saskschools/sask/mining.html Saskatchewan Mining Association. (n.d.). Retrieved March 10, 2015, from from www.saskmining.ca Morgan, V. (2015, March 10). [Personal interview]. (dad) Greva, T. (2015, March 10). [Personal interview]. (dad) File:Park_Słowackiego_Lodz.jpg. (2014, September 4). Retrieved April 14, 2015, from http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Park_Słowackiego_Lodz.jpg (park) File:Chosen-gakko classroom.jpg. (2015, April 12). Retrieved March 12, 2015, from http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Chosen-gakko_classroom.jpg (classroom) Potash. (2015, April 9). Retrieved March 12, 2015, from http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potash (solution mine)
Views: 127 Caswell SAGE
Western Potash Corp talks to Proactiveinvestors
 
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Western Potash is a junior mining company engaged in the acquisition, evaluation and exploration of potash mineral properties in Western Canada. http://www.proactiveinvestors.co.uk/
Potassium chloride
 
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The chemical compound potassium chloride (KCl) is a metal halide salt composed of potassium and chlorine. In its pure state, it is odorless and has a white or colorless vitreous crystal appearance, with a crystal structure that cleaves easily in three directions. Potassium chloride crystals are face-centered cubic. Potassium chloride was historically known as "muriate of potash". This name is occasionally still encountered in association with its use as a fertilizer. Potash varies in color from pink or red to white depending on the mining and recovery process used. White potash, sometimes referred to as soluble potash, is usually higher in analysis and is used primarily for making liquid starter fertilizers. KCl is used in medicine, scientific applications, and food processing. It occurs naturally as the mineral sylvite and in combination with sodium chloride as sylvinite. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 14943 Audiopedia
Borehole water Harare's solution for water crisis
 
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The cleanest and safest water one can find in Harare is borehole water or bottled water. In some parts of the city running water from the tapes has not been coming out for years. Most people have resorted to sinking wells or boreholes. Selling water, drilling wells or boreholes has become big business as the city fails to provide clean safe drinking water. This video shows a glimpse of how a borehole is drilled and the impact it has on the community. The video also shows and tells the challenges and solutions people have resorted to due to the water crisis.
Views: 357 Joseph Munda
Why Is It Called Potash?
 
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Potassium is an important mineral required for human health potassium fertilizer (commonly called potash) mined from underground deposits in many parts of the world. To ver the most common type of potash fertilizer is compound potassium chloride (kcl), also known as muriate. Potash based fertilizers aither commoditiescollins english dictionary. From potash to ready cash. Other common forms are sulfate of. Q & a what you need to know about potash telegraph. Potash potash wikipediawhat is pnt where does come from? What potash? A primer what it and comes from the globe an overview for fertilizer thermo fisher scientificabout. As a source of soluble potassium, potassium is the seventh most abundant element in earth's crust and found every cell plants per mosaic's october 7th, 2013 conference call for agricultural use, chloride often called muriate potash. The term potash derives from the dutch word potaschen, which means pot ashes most common type of is potassium chloride (kcl). Arab potash company facts & figures. Potash potash wikipedia en. Wikipedia wiki potash "imx0m" url? Q webcache. Potash was a term coined by american settlers because they produced potassium evaporating water that potash refers to any of various salts contain (symbol k in the and resulting solution, leaving white residue called 'pot ash' is most common natural source often used it sometimes regulator due its participation over 60 16 mar 2018 there are few different kinds potash, but one that's deposited extensively beneath michigan chloride (kcl), known as for brown powder. Canada is the largest producer of potash fertilizer, common name for any several compounds containing potassium, such as potassium carbonate (k 2 co 3 ), oxide o) and chloride (kcl). The name derives from pot ash, which refers to plant ashes soaked in water a pot, the primary means of manufacturing product before industrial era. Why is it called potash? A. What is potash used for and why does michigan have so much of it? . Potash in the united states southern cooperative. Potassium was first derived in 1807 by electrolysis of caustic potash (potassium hydroxide) 27 may 2015 the element potassium named after word. Koh) is commonly called caustic potash, an additional source of confusion fertilizer potassium sometimes potash, a term that comes from early production technique where was leached wood ashes and concentrated by evaporating the leachate in large iron pots ( pot ash ). Kcl is also known as muriate of potash (mop) or sylvite, a naturally occurring mineral5 nov 2010 there are three major layers recoverable ore across the province, running in 280 kilometre long band called prairie formation 11 oct 2018 potash, various potassium compounds, chiefly crude carbonate. If you were a girl or boy living two hundred years ago, making potash might have been one of your jobs. Geoalcali potash mining quick guide to. These compounds are used primarily in the manufacturing of fertilizer. Googleusercontent search.
Evaporator Set Up at the Legacy Site
 
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Video created and edited by our very own Jochen Kirn!
Potash West, "Developing Potassium-rich Glauconite Deposits in Western Australia's Perth Basin"
 
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SNNLive spoke with Patrick McManus, Managing Director for Potash West NL (ASX: PWN) (OTCQX: PWNNY) at Cambridge House International's Vancouver Resource Investment Conference 2013. For more information: http://potashwest.com.au/ On StockNewsNow.com: http://stocknewsnow.com/patrick-mcmanus-managing-director-at-potash-west-nl-developing-potassium-rich-glauconite-deposits-in-western-australias-perth-basin/
Views: 276 Stock News Now
Building the Pyramids of Egypt with Artificial Stones
 
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** Subtitles available (english, french and polish) ** Prof. Joseph DAVIDOVITS presents, in this 1h20 conference, his famous theory on how the Egyptians pyramids were built with re-agglomerated limestone. This conference was recorded in 2008 representing the knowledge of that time. Since then, recent scientific studies using very powerful and modern equipment found the ultimate evidence that the pyramids stones are synthetic. Read more at https://www.geopolymer.org/pyramids Believing in the artificial stone theory, or countering it, is simply no longer relevant. It has become a truth, a fact. FAQ for artificial stone supporters: https://www.geopolymer.org/archaeology/pyramids/faq-for-artificial-stone-supporters You can buy the latest book: "Why the pharaohs built the Pyramids with fake stones" in paper book and ebook at this page: https://www.geopolymer.org/shop/ or at any bookstores. ** Participate in the translation of the subtitles in your language: ** https://www.youtube.com/timedtext_video?ref=share&v=k0nOw_ebmGk
Views: 78837 Geopolymer Institute
What Is Potassium
 
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What Is Potassium Name Origin From potash (pot ash); K from latin: kalium "Potassium" in different languages. Sources Found in minerals like carnallite [(KMgCl3).6H2O] and sylvite (KCl). Potassium makes up about 2.40% of the weight of the Earth's crust, it is the seventh most abundant element. The main sources of potash are mined in USA (California, New Mexico and Utah) and Germany. Around 200 tons are produced annually. Abundance Universe: 3 ppm (by weight) Sun: 4 ppm (by weight) Carbonaceous meteorite: 710 ppm Earth's Crust: 15000 ppm Human: 2 x 106 ppb by weight 3.2 x 105 ppb by atoms Uses Used as potash (potassium carbonate) in making glass, soap, lenses and salt substitute. Also as potassium nitrate (KNO3, also called saltpeter) it is used to make explosives and to colour fireworks in mauve. Glass treated with liquid potassium is much stronger than regular glass. Potassium chloride (KCl) is used as a substitute for table salt and is also used to stop the heart, e.g. in cardiac surgery and in executions by lethal injection in solution. History Potassium was discovered in 1807 by Sir Humphry Davy, who derived it from caustic potash (KOH). Potassium was the first metal that was isolated by electrolysis.
Views: 10144 bbawor
Halogen | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Halogen 00:01:13 1 History 00:04:17 1.1 Etymology 00:05:33 2 Characteristics 00:05:42 2.1 Chemical 00:07:29 2.1.1 Molecules 00:07:37 2.1.1.1 Diatomic halogen molecules 00:08:13 2.1.2 Compounds 00:08:21 2.1.2.1 Hydrogen halides 00:10:21 2.1.2.2 Metal halides 00:11:54 2.1.2.3 Interhalogen compounds 00:13:09 2.1.2.4 Organohalogen compounds 00:13:58 2.1.2.5 Polyhalogenated compounds 00:14:27 2.1.3 Reactions 00:14:35 2.1.3.1 Reactions with water 00:16:01 2.2 Physical and atomic 00:16:24 2.2.1 Isotopes 00:18:25 3 Production 00:20:18 4 Applications 00:22:40 5 Biological role 00:25:19 6 Toxicity 00:27:39 7 Superhalogen 00:29:08 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The halogens () are a group in the periodic table consisting of five chemically related elements: fluorine (F), chlorine (Cl), bromine (Br), iodine (I), and astatine (At). The artificially created element 117 (tennessine, Ts) may also be a halogen. In the modern IUPAC nomenclature, this group is known as group 17. The symbol X is often used generically to refer to any halogen. The name "halogen" means "salt-producing". When halogens react with metals they produce a wide range of salts, including calcium fluoride, sodium chloride (common table salt), silver bromide and potassium iodide. The group of halogens is the only periodic table group that contains elements in three of the main states of matter at standard temperature and pressure. All of the halogens form acids when bonded to hydrogen. Most halogens are typically produced from minerals or salts. The middle halogens, that is chlorine, bromine and iodine, are often used as disinfectants. Organobromides are the most important class of flame retardants. Elemental halogens are dangerous and can be lethally toxic.
Views: 1 wikipedia tts
Potassium | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Potassium 00:02:25 1 Etymology 00:04:00 2 Properties 00:04:09 2.1 Physical 00:04:42 2.2 Chemical 00:07:17 2.2.1 Compounds 00:09:01 2.3 Isotopes 00:09:23 3 Cosmic formation and distribution 00:09:32 4 Potash 00:11:27 5 Metal 00:11:38 6 Geology 00:12:24 7 Biological role 00:12:33 7.1 Biochemical function 00:14:19 7.2 Homeostasis 00:14:28 7.2.1 Plasma levels 00:15:09 7.2.2 Control mechanisms 00:15:19 7.2.3 Renal filtration, reabsorption, and excretion 00:16:20 8 Nutrition 00:16:30 8.1 Dietary recommendations 00:16:59 8.2 Food sources 00:18:01 8.3 Deficient intake 00:18:30 8.4 Supplementation 00:19:46 8.5 Detection by taste buds 00:22:34 9 Commercial production 00:25:30 9.1 Mining 00:25:39 9.2 Chemical extraction 00:27:55 10 Commercial uses 00:28:42 10.1 Fertilizer 00:28:56 10.2 Food additives 00:30:32 10.3 Industrial 00:31:11 10.3.1 Niche uses 00:31:20 10.3.2 Laboratory uses 00:32:44 11 Precautions 00:34:51 12 See also 00:35:01 13 References 00:36:25 14 Bibliography 00:37:06 15 External links 00:39:01 undefined 00:40:04 undefined 00:40:39 undefined Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Potassium is a chemical element with symbol K (from Neo-Latin kalium) and atomic number 19. It was first isolated from potash, the ashes of plants, from which its name derives. In the periodic table, potassium is one of the alkali metals. All of the alkali metals have a single valence electron in the outer electron shell, which is easily removed to create an ion with a positive charge – a cation, which combines with anions to form salts. Potassium in nature occurs only in ionic salts. Elemental potassium is a soft silvery-white alkali metal that oxidizes rapidly in air and reacts vigorously with water, generating sufficient heat to ignite hydrogen emitted in the reaction, and burning with a lilac-colored flame. It is found dissolved in sea water (which is 0.04% potassium by weight), and is part of many minerals. Potassium is chemically very similar to sodium, the previous element in group 1 of the periodic table. They have a similar first ionization energy, which allows for each atom to give up its sole outer electron. That they are different elements that combine with the same anions to make similar salts was suspected in 1702, and was proven in 1807 using electrolysis. Naturally occurring potassium is composed of three isotopes, of which 40K is radioactive. Traces of 40K are found in all potassium, and it is the most common radioisotope in the human body. Potassium ions are vital for the functioning of all living cells. The transfer of potassium ions through nerve cell membranes is necessary for normal nerve transmission; potassium deficiency and excess can each result in numerous signs and symptoms, including an abnormal heart rhythm and various electrocardiographic abnormalities. Fresh fruits and vegetables are good dietary sources of potassium. The body responds to the influx of dietary potassium, which raises serum potassium levels, with a shift of potassium from outside to inside cells and an increase in potassium excretion by the kidneys. Most industrial applications of potassium exploit the high solubility in water of potassium compounds, such as potassium soaps. Heavy crop production rapidly depletes the soil of potassium, and this can be remedied with agricultural fertilizers containing potassium, accounting for 95% of global potassium chemical production.
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Caesium | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caesium 00:02:15 1 Characteristics 00:02:24 1.1 Physical properties 00:04:42 1.2 Chemical properties 00:06:26 1.3 Compounds 00:08:27 1.3.1 Complexes 00:09:11 1.3.2 Halides 00:10:32 1.3.3 Oxides 00:11:43 1.4 Isotopes 00:14:58 1.5 Occurrence 00:17:49 2 Production 00:21:32 3 History 00:26:00 4 Applications 00:26:09 4.1 Petroleum exploration 00:27:58 4.2 Atomic clocks 00:29:03 4.3 SI Units 00:29:32 4.4 Electric power and electronics 00:31:19 4.5 Centrifugation fluids 00:31:53 4.6 Chemical and medical use 00:33:04 4.7 Nuclear and isotope applications 00:35:06 4.8 Other uses 00:37:15 5 Health and safety hazards 00:40:11 6 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Caesium (IUPAC spelling) or cesium (American spelling) is a chemical element with symbol Cs and atomic number 55. It is a soft, silvery-gold alkali metal with a melting point of 28.5 °C (83.3 °F), which makes it one of only five elemental metals that are liquid at or near room temperature. Caesium has physical and chemical properties similar to those of rubidium and potassium. The most reactive of all metals, it is pyrophoric and reacts with water even at −116 °C (−177 °F). It is the least electronegative element, with a value of 0.79 on the Pauling scale. It has only one stable isotope, caesium-133. Caesium is mined mostly from pollucite, while the radioisotopes, especially caesium-137, a fission product, are extracted from waste produced by nuclear reactors. The German chemist Robert Bunsen and physicist Gustav Kirchhoff discovered caesium in 1860 by the newly developed method of flame spectroscopy. The first small-scale applications for caesium were as a "getter" in vacuum tubes and in photoelectric cells. In 1967, acting on Einstein's proof that the speed of light is the most constant dimension in the universe, the International System of Units used two specific wave counts from an emission spectrum of caesium-133 to co-define the second and the metre. Since then, caesium has been widely used in highly accurate atomic clocks. Since the 1990s, the largest application of the element has been as caesium formate for drilling fluids, but it has a range of applications in the production of electricity, in electronics, and in chemistry. The radioactive isotope caesium-137 has a half-life of about 30 years and is used in medical applications, industrial gauges, and hydrology. Nonradioactive caesium compounds are only mildly toxic, but the pure metal's tendency to react explosively with water means that caesium is considered a hazardous material, and the radioisotopes present a significant health and ecological hazard in the environment.
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Halogen | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Halogen 00:01:13 1 History 00:04:18 1.1 Etymology 00:05:34 2 Characteristics 00:05:44 2.1 Chemical 00:07:31 2.1.1 Molecules 00:07:39 2.1.1.1 Diatomic halogen molecules 00:08:14 2.1.2 Compounds 00:08:22 2.1.2.1 Hydrogen halides 00:10:23 2.1.2.2 Metal halides 00:11:56 2.1.2.3 Interhalogen compounds 00:13:11 2.1.2.4 Organohalogen compounds 00:14:01 2.1.2.5 Polyhalogenated compounds 00:14:30 2.1.3 Reactions 00:14:38 2.1.3.1 Reactions with water 00:16:04 2.2 Physical and atomic 00:16:27 2.2.1 Isotopes 00:18:28 3 Production 00:20:21 4 Applications 00:22:44 5 Biological role 00:25:23 6 Toxicity 00:27:44 7 Superhalogen 00:29:12 8 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The halogens () are a group in the periodic table consisting of five chemically related elements: fluorine (F), chlorine (Cl), bromine (Br), iodine (I), and astatine (At). The artificially created element 117 (tennessine, Ts) may also be a halogen. In the modern IUPAC nomenclature, this group is known as group 17. The symbol X is often used generically to refer to any halogen. The name "halogen" means "salt-producing". When halogens react with metals they produce a wide range of salts, including calcium fluoride, sodium chloride (common table salt), silver bromide and potassium iodide. The group of halogens is the only periodic table group that contains elements in three of the main states of matter at standard temperature and pressure. All of the halogens form acids when bonded to hydrogen. Most halogens are typically produced from minerals or salts. The middle halogens, that is chlorine, bromine and iodine, are often used as disinfectants. Organobromides are the most important class of flame retardants. Elemental halogens are dangerous and can be lethally toxic.
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