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Does Cryptococcus neoformans cause foliculitus? What fungus does cause foliculitus and ear infection
 
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Mastered ultra instink Goku its difficult but not imposible, this information is not correct in this video. I was told i had scabies and i had no idea this is a fungus. Cryptococcus is a genus of fungi, which grow in culture as yeasts. The sexual forms or teleomorphs of Cryptococcus species are filamentous fungi in the genus Filobasidiella. Wikipedia Scientific name: Cryptococcus Higher classification: Tremellaceae Rank: Genus The major species of Cryptococcus that causes illness in human is Cryptococcus neoformans Pityrosporum folliculitis, also known as Malassezia folliculitis, is a condition that causesbreakouts on your skin. This condition is considered common. It happens when yeastbacteria, which naturally occur on your skin, get under your skin and into your hair follicles Select LanguageAfrikaansAlbanianAmharicArabicArmenianAzerbaijaniBasqueBelarusianBengaliBosnianBulgarianCatalanCebuanoChichewaChinese (Simplified)Chinese (Traditional)CorsicanCroatianCzechDanishDutchEsperantoEstonianFilipinoFinnishFrenchFrisianGalicianGeorgianGermanGreekGujaratiHaitian CreoleHausaHawaiianHebrewHindiHmongHungarianIcelandicIgboIndonesianIrishItalianJapaneseJavaneseKannadaKazakhKhmerKoreanKurdish (Kurmanji)KyrgyzLaoLatinLatvianLithuanianLuxembourgishMacedonianMalagasyMalayMalayalamMalteseMaoriMarathiMongolianMyanmar (Burmese)NepaliNorwegianPashtoPersianPolishPortuguesePunjabiRomanianRussianSamoanScots GaelicSerbianSesothoShonaSindhiSinhalaSlovakSlovenianSomaliSpanishSundaneseSwahiliSwedishTajikTamilTeluguThaiTurkishUkrainianUrduUzbekVietnameseWelshXhosaYiddishYorubaZulu   Powered by Translate DermNet NZHome Images TRANSLATE  SEARCH DERMNET  Home Images Topics A–Z Browse CME Quizzes About Donate Contact Jobs Home»Topics A–Z»Malassezia folliculitis Malassezia folliculitis Author: Dr Amanda Oakley, Dermatologist, Hamilton, New Zealand,1997. Updated by Dr Thomas Stewart, General Practitioner, Sydney, Australia, November 2017. What is malassezia folliculitis? Malassezia folliculitis, previously known as pityrosporum folliculitis, is an infection of hair follicles caused by lipophilic malassezia yeasts. There are multiple malassezia species, including furfur, globosa, sympodialis and restricta [1]. The yeast is a normal inhabitant of human skin and only causes disease under specific conditions [2]. WHAT ARE THE CONDITIONS IN A OTHERWISE HEALTHY PERSON????? Malassezia have been linked to a number of skin diseases including seborrhoeicdermatitis, folliculitis, confluent and reticulated papillomatosis and pityriasisversicolor [3]. Who gets malassezia folliculitis? Malassezia folliculitis is most commonly seen in adolescent and young adult males living in humid climates [3,4]. Other risk factors include: High sebum production [3,4]Hyperhidrosis (excessive sweating) [3,4]Occlusion from emollients and sunscreensAntibiotic use [5]Oral steroids such as prednisone (steroid acne)Immunosuppression [6].  How does malassezia folliculitis present? Malassezia folliculitis presents as small uniform itchy papules and pustules on the forehead, chin, neck, trunk and extensor aspect of the upper limbs. They may be itchy. How is malassezia folliculitis diagnosed? Clinical examination is usually sufficient for diagnosis. Laboratory investigations may be performed. Potassium hydroxide preparation of skin scrapings may reveal budding spores and hyphae [7].Other stains, including the May-Grunwald-Giema stain may also be helpful, but are less commonly used [1].Cultures are not routinely done, as malassezia species typically require special media for growth. Malassezia folliculitis may also be suspected by finding organisms within the hairfollicles on histopathological examination of a skin biopsy. Treatment of malassezia folliculitis It is important to address any predisposing factors at the outset, as malassezia folliculitis has a tendency to recur. Oral treatment is recommended, as it has proven much more effective than topical agent. Fluconazole is used more commonly than itraconazole due to its superior side effect profile [8]. Topical agents (eg, selenium sulfide shampoo, econazole solution) may also be used but should be reserved for those unable to tolerate oral treatment  [9,10]. Isotretinoin and photodynamic therapy (PDT) have been used with some success in small case series [8, 11,12]. Prevention of malassezia folliculitis Recurrence is common, even after successful treatment [10]. Long-term prophylaxis with topical agents may be considered in those at high-risk or with multiple recurrences.
Views: 41 Jason Meyer
Introduction to Fungal Pathogens
 
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In this video, Biology Professor (Twitter: @DrWhitneyHolden) discusses the basics of understanding several important human fungal pathogens and the diseases they cause, including Candida albicans, Pneumocystis jiroveci, Histoplasma capsulatum, Blastomyces dermatitidis, Coccidioides immitis, and dermatophytes. In addition, reasons why many fungi are good for humans are also discussed, along with a brief mention of fungal pathogens of plants and amphibians. Great for MCAT Biology Review!
Views: 23350 Biology Professor
Paramyxoviridae Classification
 
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Paramyxoviridae Classification.
Views: 516 rhomusic
Chrom agar for Candida species differential and Yeast sensitivity medium
 
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Please watch: "Chicken pox" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rvWo141B-ZI -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 802 Microhub Plus
Medical Video Lecture: NOCARDIA, Microbiology
 
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FREE FREE FREE !!! FIGURE1 medical app: Discover medical cases from every specialty their views and advice DOWNLOAD NOW  http://download.figure1.com/greenglobe Prepare for USMLE,UK,CANADIAN,AUSTRALIAN, NURSING & OTHER MEDICAL BOARD examinations around the globe with us.Understand the basics, concepts and how to answer wisely and score 99 in each step. we are here to help you. What are you waiting for subscribe now!!! SUBSCRIBE NOW: http://bit.ly/161OmbF For Business inquiries: [email protected] Join our USMLE step 1 prep Zone : https://www.facebook.com/groups/730000020375744 Join our USMLE CK STUDY GROUP: https://www.facebook.com/groups/320959178079398
Views: 2922 allornonelaw
Yeast bread | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Yeast bread 00:02:17 1 History 00:04:37 2 Nutrition and growth 00:06:55 3 Ecology 00:10:21 4 Reproduction 00:13:01 5 Uses 00:13:43 5.1 Alcoholic beverages 00:14:46 5.1.1 Beer 00:18:35 5.1.2 Wine 00:20:30 5.2 Baking 00:23:22 5.3 Bioremediation 00:24:13 5.4 Industrial ethanol production 00:25:20 5.5 Nonalcoholic beverages 00:26:46 5.6 Nutritional supplements 00:28:30 5.7 Probiotics 00:29:07 5.8 Aquarium hobby 00:29:35 5.9 Yeast extract 00:30:41 5.10 Scientific research 00:32:26 5.11 Genetically engineered biofactories 00:33:13 6 Pathogenic yeasts 00:34:51 7 Food spoilage 00:36:04 8 See also 00:36:32 9 Further reading Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Yeasts are eukaryotic, single-celled microorganisms classified as members of the fungus kingdom. The first yeast originated hundreds of millions of years ago, and 1,500 species are currently identified. They are estimated to constitute 1% of all described fungal species. Yeasts are unicellular organisms which evolved from multicellular ancestors, with some species having the ability to develop multicellular characteristics by forming strings of connected budding cells known as pseudohyphae or false hyphae. Yeast sizes vary greatly, depending on species and environment, typically measuring 3–4 µm in diameter, although some yeasts can grow to 40 µm in size. Most yeasts reproduce asexually by mitosis, and many do so by the asymmetric division process known as budding. Yeasts, with their single-celled growth habit, can be contrasted with molds, which grow hyphae. Fungal species that can take both forms (depending on temperature or other conditions) are called dimorphic fungi ("dimorphic" means "having two forms"). By fermentation, the yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae converts carbohydrates to carbon dioxide and alcohols – for thousands of years the carbon dioxide has been used in baking and the alcohol in alcoholic beverages. It is also a centrally important model organism in modern cell biology research, and is one of the most thoroughly researched eukaryotic microorganisms. Researchers have used it to gather information about the biology of the eukaryotic cell and ultimately human biology. Other species of yeasts, such as Candida albicans, are opportunistic pathogens and can cause infections in humans. Yeasts have recently been used to generate electricity in microbial fuel cells, and produce ethanol for the biofuel industry. Yeasts do not form a single taxonomic or phylogenetic grouping. The term "yeast" is often taken as a synonym for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but the phylogenetic diversity of yeasts is shown by their placement in two separate phyla: the Ascomycota and the Basidiomycota. The budding yeasts ("true yeasts") are classified in the order Saccharomycetales, within the phylum Ascomycota.
Views: 33 wikipedia tts
Clinical Mycology: Direct Examination Series: Blastomyces [Hot Topic]
 
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Direct microscopic examination of fungi in clinical specimens relies on both bright-field and phase-contrast microscopy, as well as multiple stains to optimize visualization of the organism. Dr. Roberts applies his lifetime of experience to assist you in differentiating the organisms under consideration in your patient’s differential diagnosis. Each presentation in this 11-part series addresses 1 or more genus or group. A series presented by Glen Roberts, PhD.
various fungal media and its uasage, fungal growth  macroscopic appearance i e  surface texture and
 
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Following media are used for fungal growth- 1) SDA with gentamycin and chloramphenicol- for the primary isolation and routine cultivation of yeasts and moulds 2)Dermatophyte test medium i.e. SDA with chloramphenicol, gentamycin and Cycloheximide( actidione)- for the primary isolation and cultivation of dermatophytes 3)SDA with 5% Salt- for the differentiation of Trichophyton spp. 4)Czapek CornDox agar- for routine cultivation of fungi , especially Aspergillus, Penicillium , and non sporulating moulds 5) corn meal agar (CMA) with Sucrose and Dextrose- for Zygomycete sporulation 6)Potato Dextrose Agar (PDA)- for routine cultivation and identification of fungi...
Views: 6481 Microhub Plus
USMLE Review - Micro (Fungi)
 
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A HY Review of Fungi for Step 1!
Views: 14804 Matthew McGlothlin
Fungal Pathogens: Part 1 of 2
 
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Fungi are a natural part of the environment and can be found all around us. Some types of fungi, including those found in our environment and others in mold infested indoor environments can cause infections in some people. This is particularly true with people with a weakened immune system. The following are some of the more well known fungal diseases and the pathogenic fungi that cause them: Aspergillus is a common fungus that can be found in some indoor and outdoor environments. Aspergillosis is the name of the infection caused by Aspergillus. There are several different kinds of aspergillosis. Blastomycosis is a disease caused by the fungus Blastomyces dermatitidis. The fungus lives in moist soil and in association with decomposing organic matter such as wood and leaves. The symptoms of blastomycosis are often similar to flu symptoms. Candidiasis is a fungal infection caused by yeasts that belong to the genus Candida. There are over 20 species of Candida yeasts that can cause infection in humans, the most common of which is Candida albicans. Coccidioidomycosis, also called Valley Fever, is an infection caused by the fungus Coccidioides, which lives in the soil of dry, low rainfall areas. It is endemic in many areas of the southwestern United States, Mexico, Central and South America. Cryptococcosis is an infection caused by fungi that belong to the genus Cryptococcus. There are over 30 different species of Cryptococcus, but two species -- Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii cause nearly all cryptococcal infections in humans and animals. Dermatophytes are fungi that cause skin, hair and nail infections. Infections caused by these fungi are also sometimes known as "ringworm" or "tinea." There are many different species of dermatophytes that can cause infection in humans. Two of the most common types are Trichophyton rubrum and Trichophyton tonsurans, These are just a few things to know about fungal pathogens and Part 2 of this video series will discuss other common fungal pathogens.
Views: 45505 Paul Cochrane
Lovebird Desperately Mourns Over the Loss of Her Beloved Partner | Amazing Animals
 
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Lovebird Desperately Mourns Over the Loss of Her Beloved Partner | Amazing Animals by The Frugal_Trekker https://youtu.be/4qweiLGmkNQ I cannot hold on my feeling of guilt and grief upon seeing this lovebird's desperate moment over the remains of her departed partner. This reminds me of my dear departed disabled pigeon whom I have lived with for 5 years until her untimely demise. 14 Fun Facts About Lovebirds 1. Lovebirds mate for life. The monogamous birds reach reproductive maturity when they're about ten months old. Mating begins with courtship behavior, and can continue throughout their roughly 15-year lifespans. Monogamy is essential to the social stability of flocks and underlies much of their social behavior. 2. Lovebirds pine for each other. If a mate dies or gets separated from the flock, its companion exhibits erratic behavior that some have likened to depression. Birds kept as pets often don't like being alone and will exhibit similar behavior in captivity. 3. Like overly affectionate couples in restaurants on Valentine’s Day, lovebirds feed each other. Often after a long separation or stressful period of time, breeding pairs of lovebirds feed each other to re-establish their bond. One bird transfers food to the mouth of its mate, a feeding technique reminiscent of affection in humans—hence the inspiration for the parrots' name. 4. There's more than one species of lovebird. The nine species classified as lovebirds come all from the genus Agapornis. Most lovebirds have a green body and sport different head feather coloration. Their closest relatives are hanging parrots, found in Asia. 5. Lovebirds are from Africa. Lovebirds are native to the forests and savannas of Sub-Saharan Africa and Madagascar. Fossils of ancient lovebird species have been unearthed in South Africa, dating to as far back as 1.9 million years ago. 6. But you might see a lovebird at your backyard birdfeeder. That's if you live in the American southwest, San Francisco or cities in Africa. These areas are home to feral populations, flocks that likely either escaped from an aviary or are the remnants of an abandoned aviary. 7. Lovebirds live in holes. Lovebirds are cavity dwellers they make their home in holes in trees, rocks or shrubs in the wild. Some species nest in groups, while others pair off to build their nests away from the flock. 8. Different lovebird species build their nests in different ways. Fisher’s lovebirds (Agapornis fischeri) carry single strips of tree bark in their beaks. Peach-faced lovebirds (Agapornis roseicollis), on the other hand, hide bark in their feathers. 9. Some lovebirds are androgynous. In three species of lovebirds, the males and females have defining characteristics that allow you to tell them apart. For example, among Black-winged lovebirds (Agapornis taranta), males have a crown of red feathers, while females have entirely green plumage. 10. Lovebirds don't eat chocolate. It might seem like common sense, but save your chocolate and give it to a human. Lovebirds survive on a healthy diet of seeds, berries, fruit, and occassionally insect larva in the wild. In Africa, they're also known as crafty crop pests, as they feast on millet and maize farms. 11. Lovebirds can be mean. Aggression isn't uncommon in lovebirds. The parrots are territorial, and are known to get along poorly with birds of another species. Within their own kind, lovebirds can also become jealous or hormonal during mating season. 12. Lovebirds can carry zoonotic diseases that infect humans. Some studies suggest that lovebirds can carry yeast bacteria (Cryptococcus neoformans) capable of infecting humans. 13. Some lovebirds might become endangered in the next decade. The black-cheeked lovebird (Agapornis nigrigenis), native to Zambia and found in parts of Zimbabwe and Botswana, is classified as vulnerable by the IUCN Red Listing of Threatened Species. 14. Lovebirds (sort of) inspired Valentine's Day. Scholars typically cite a poem by Geoffrey Chaucer as the first evidence of the connection between the religious celebration of Saint Valentine's day and romantic love. The poem, "Parliament of Foules," happens to feature two birds which exhibit all the markings of human love. Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-nature/14-fun-facts-about-lovebirds-180949742/#G0ZdMKJFbYpBs6AG.99 Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter Credits to: @latifchangpti Related Tags: Lovebird Desperately Mourns Over the Loss of Her Beloved Partner | Amazing Animals | lovebirds | love bird | animal | birds | bird lover | Wildlife | pets | pet | Columbidae | heart warming | feed | animal enthusiast | cute | animal cruelty | cruelty | moment | SPCA | parrot | nut | animal video | cute animals | eggs | giant eggs | ducklings | ducks | animal shelter | abandoned animals | rescue animals | cute pets | vet ranch | dr. matt | animal ranch | recovery | youtube | dr. kerry | tame | food | viral | viral video | TheFrugal_Trekker
Views: 1796 TheFrugal _Trekker
Yeast | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yeast 00:02:17 1 History 00:04:56 2 Nutrition and growth 00:07:15 3 Ecology 00:10:41 4 Reproduction 00:13:19 5 Uses 00:14:00 5.1 Alcoholic beverages 00:15:03 5.1.1 Beer 00:18:53 5.1.2 Wine 00:20:47 5.2 Baking 00:23:39 5.3 Bioremediation 00:24:30 5.4 Industrial ethanol production 00:25:36 5.5 Nonalcoholic beverages 00:27:01 5.6 Nutritional supplements 00:28:45 5.7 Probiotics 00:29:21 5.8 Aquarium hobby 00:29:49 5.9 Yeast extract 00:30:54 5.10 Scientific research 00:32:38 5.11 Genetically engineered biofactories 00:33:24 6 Pathogenic yeasts 00:35:01 7 Food spoilage 00:36:14 8 See also 00:36:42 9 Further reading Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9358690043496498 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Yeasts are eukaryotic single-celled microorganisms classified as members of the fungus kingdom. The first yeast originated hundreds of millions of years ago, and 1,500 species are currently identified. They are estimated to constitute 1% of all described fungal species. Yeasts are unicellular organisms which evolved from multicellular ancestors, with some species having the ability to develop multicellular characteristics by forming strings of connected budding cells known as pseudohyphae or false hyphae. Yeast sizes vary greatly, depending on species and environment, typically measuring 3–4 µm in diameter, although some yeasts can grow to 40 µm in size. Most yeasts reproduce asexually by mitosis, and many do so by the asymmetric division process known as budding. Yeasts, with their single-celled growth habit, can be contrasted with molds, which grow hyphae. Fungal species that can take both forms (depending on temperature or other conditions) are called dimorphic fungi ("dimorphic" means "having two forms"). By fermentation, the yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae converts carbohydrates to carbon dioxide and alcohols – for thousands of years the carbon dioxide has been used in baking and the alcohol in alcoholic beverages. It is also a centrally important model organism in modern cell biology research, and is one of the most thoroughly researched eukaryotic microorganisms. Researchers have used it to gather information about the biology of the eukaryotic cell and ultimately human biology. Other species of yeasts, such as Candida albicans, are opportunistic pathogens and can cause infections in humans. Yeasts have recently been used to generate electricity in microbial fuel cells, and produce ethanol for the biofuel industry. Yeasts do not form a single taxonomic or phylogenetic grouping. The term "yeast" is often taken as a synonym for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but the phylogenetic diversity of yeasts is shown by their placement in two separate phyla: the Ascomycota and the Basidiomycota. The budding yeasts ("true yeasts") are classified in the order Saccharomycetales, within the phylum Ascomycota.
Views: 5 wikipedia tts
ANCYLOSTOMA DUODENALE || HOOK WORMS || STRUCTURE || LIFE CYCLE || SYMPTOMS || BY PHANINDRA GUPTA
 
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For notes on this topic check the link given below :- http://biomedhistory.com/ancylostomiasis/ - Subscribe our channel for more videos
Views: 6224 Alampally Phanindra
FUNGUS - Documentary
 
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A '''fungus''' (; [[plural]]: '''fungi''' or '''funguses''') is any member of the group of [[Eukaryote|eukaryotic]] organisms that includes microorganisms such as [[yeast]]s and [[mold]]s, as well as the more familiar [[mushroom]]s. These organisms are classified as a [[Kingdom (biology)|kingdom]], '''Fungi''', which is separate from the other eukaryotic life kingdoms of [[plant]]s and [[animal]]s. A characteristic that places fungi in a different kingdom from plants, bacteria, and some protists is [[chitin]] in their [[cell wall]]s. Similar to animals, fungi are [[heterotroph]]s; they acquire their food by absorbing dissolved molecules, typically by secreting [[digestive enzyme]]s into their environment. Fungi do not [[photosynthesis]]e. Growth is their means of mobility, except for spores (a few of which are flagellated), which may travel through the air or water. Fungi are the principal decomposers in ecological systems. These and other differences place fungi in a single gr... http://www.wikividi.com ____________________________________ Shortcuts to chapters: 00:05:03: Etymology 00:06:04: Characteristics 00:08:18: Diversity 00:11:05: Mycology 00:12:26: History 00:14:38: Microscopic structures 00:16:52: Macroscopic structures 00:18:16: Growth and physiology 00:21:38: Reproduction 00:22:30: Spore dispersal 00:24:19: Evolution 00:29:16: Taxonomy 00:31:49: Taxonomic groups ____________________________________ Copyright WikiVidi. Licensed under Creative Commons. Wikipedia link: https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Fungus
Aspergillosis  Medicoapps Masterclass NEET PG  DNB AIIMS PG
 
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In this Medicoapps Masterclass the Following Topics are disucssed 1. What is Aspergillosis 2. What is the Most common Cause of Aspergillosis 3. Morphology and Cultural Characteristics of Aspergillosis 4. Clinical Spectrum & Manifestation of Aspergillosis 5. Aspergilloma & Clinical Slides 6. Invasive Aspergillosis 7. Halo Sign 8. Air Crescent Sign 9. Monod Sign 10. Extrapulmonary Manifestation of Aspergillosis 11. Otomycosis 12. Wet Newspaper Like Appearance in Otomycosis 13. Allergic Fungal Sinusitis 14. Endophthalmitis - Satellite Lesions 15. Allergic Manifestation of Aspergillosis 16. Exam Review Points on Aspergillosis
Views: 1291 Medicoapps
Yoko's Vet Review - Fungal Respiratory Disease
 
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This is a quick review of Fungal Respiratory Disease in both English and Japanese! (It's a home made series so apologize for the hockey pokey quality of the video) For more videos, please visit yoko.ambrosini.us. 日本の獣医師、獣医学生、獣医関係の方に獣医英語を簡単に学べるきっかけとなるビデオを作りました。国際学会へいく直前の復習や、留学準備用など、どんどん活用していただ­­­ければ光栄です。まだまだ荒削りな部分が多々ありますが、改善のためのコメント待っています。
Views: 271 VetYoko
Aspergillus Springboard
 
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This video is part of a comprehensive medical school microbiology, immunology & infectious diseases course. Your comments on videos will be key as we iterate content. If you are interested in implementing all or part of this course, we are happy to share and would only ask for your candid evaluation in return: https://stanfordmedicine.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_8i98rRk2XRCXQ45 If you are interested in collaborating with us, please contact: [email protected] This course was created collaboratively between Stanford, UW, Duke, UCSF, and University of Michigan and made possible by support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
USMLE MICROBIOLOGY PEARL: Characteristic of different streptococci species
 
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FREE FREE FREE !!! FIGURE1 medical app: Discover medical cases from every specialty their views and advice DOWNLOAD NOW  http://download.figure1.com/greenglobe Prepare for USMLE,UK,CANADIAN,AUSTRALIAN, NURSING & OTHER MEDICAL BOARD examinations around the globe with us.Understand the basics, concepts and how to answer wisely and score 99 in each step. we are here to help you. What are you waiting for subscribe now!!! SUBSCRIBE NOW: http://bit.ly/161OmbF For Business inquiries: [email protected] Join our USMLE step 1 prep Zone : https://www.facebook.com/groups/730000020375744 Join our USMLE CK STUDY GROUP: https://www.facebook.com/groups/320959178079398
Views: 853 allornonelaw
Complex Systems: Origin of Virulence; Chaos, & Radioactive Black Dirt
 
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http://pissinontheroses.blogspot.com/2013/12/complex-systems-origin-of-virulence.html We don't own this video, we uploaded it for YouTube's friendly controls, and because it actually features a Systems thinker working in a field of myopic bean counters, most of whom have no understanding under what boundary conditions their methods / tools produce garbage. If your only interest is in Radiation, and why contaminated soils turn black skip to 29:30 If you want info on how black mushrooms may prevent radiation sickness skip to 35:04 If your interest is chaos and virulence skip to 37:42 If you want to understand why there are few systems thinkers in Biology and related Sciences watch the entire video. If you want to understand why much of peer reviewed science is a scam, skip to 43:22 There are a few weakness in the video, the most glaring of which involves global warming acceptance. Here are the video details: Category: Joseph J. Kinyoun Runtime: 00:56:48 Description: The worlds inside and outside our bodies teem with microorganisms, but most don't make us sick. Fungi in particular seem to leave mammals alone. Of the 1.5 million known fungal species, only a dozen or so are relatively common human pathogens, while insects and plants are frequent fungal targets. Why the difference? Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., will address that question—and the intriguing possibility that the demise of dinosaurs and the rise of mammals were linked by differing susceptibility to fungal diseases—in the 2013 Joseph J. Kinyoun Memorial Lecture. Casadevall is Professor and Chair of the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University in New York. His research centers on the questions of how microbes cause disease and how hosts, such as humans, defend themselves. To explore this dynamic relationship, Casadevall and colleagues have long examined Cryptococcus neoformans, a common fungus that is harmless to healthy people but can cause serious disease, including lung infections and fungal meningitis, in immune-compromised people such as those with HIV/AIDS. Many of the laboratory's projects seek to understand how hosts defend against C. neoformans and how the organism's virulence contributes to disease. Casadevall received doctoral and medical degrees from New York University and completed an internship and residency in internal medicine at Bellevue Hospital in New York City. He is the author of more than 570 papers and currently serves as Editor-in-Chief of the online, open-access journal mBio. Casadevall is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, serves on the National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity, and co-chairs the NIAID Board of Scientific Counselors. NIAID established the Kinyoun Lecture series in 1979 to honor Dr. Joseph J. Kinyoun, who in 1887 founded the Laboratory of Hygiene, forerunner of NIH, which launched a new era of scientific study of infectious diseases. For more information go to http://www.niaid.nih.gov/news/events/meetings/kinyounSeries/Pages/2013KinyounLecture.aspx Author: Arturo Casadevall, M.D., Ph.D., Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University in New York Download: Download Video How to download a Videocast Caption Text: Download Caption File CIT Live ID: 13248 Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18211
Views: 1212 potrblog
TestRun1 (E. coli on blood agar)
 
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First Test run of the homemade incubator with a viewing window for time-lapse photography. I ran into a couple of snags and had to incubate the plate without the lid, that coupled with the incubator getting a wee bit too hot is what caused the blood agar to dry out and shrink. but hey it looks pretty cool shriveling up!
Views: 516 TheBadMonkie
Update on Mycology Papers for 2016 -- Wonhee So, Pharm.D
 
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Dr. Wonhee So, ID clinical Pharmacist at Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, presents several important recent papers in the field of fungal infection diagnosis and management, and offers clinical commentary on their significance to the practice of infectious diseases in the immunocompromised patient. Dr. So covers such topics as the use of dexamethasone in the treatment of cryptococcal meningitis, the radiologic diagnosis of lung mould infections in AML, the use of Isuvaconazole in Mucor infections, and the use of combination anti fungal therapy. Stay in touch! Download our app on the Itunes store or find us below: Subscribe to our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/IDPodcasts Visit us on our webpage: http://www.idpodcasts.net/USF_ID_Podc... Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ID-Podcasts-... Tweet to us: https://twitter.com/idpodcasts
Views: 343 IDPodcasts
Fungal Pathogen
 
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From our gig on 6/16/14 with Solstice, Hellwitch, Ridge, and Wolf Among Sheep.
Views: 113 SickHarvest000
Aspergillosis
 
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"http://usmlefasttrack.com?p=5986 Aspergillosis, overview, description, review, what is, Define, Rapid Review, First Aid, for, USMLE, Step 1, wiki, define, wikipedia, 2013, exam, prep, easy, What is usmle, basic, dictionary, simple, easy, Extra Help Medical Videos "
Vomitoma - Busted Bags of Biological Waste
 
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Artist: Vomitom Album: Unorthodox Malpractice Genre: Gorenoise © Vomitoma
Views: 53 UltimateNoise
candida growth  on Cystine electrolyte Deficient agar ( CLED) agar
 
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Candida growth on Cystine electrolyte Deficient agar ( CLED) agar Yeast cells seen in gram staining Germ tube test (GTT)- Positive So, the organism is Candida albicans ( specimen was urine) -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Germ tube test" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W-fSMpaRA2o -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 502 Microhub Plus
What is the most common aspergillus infection?
 
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ID: Aspergillus fumigatus is the most common cause of aspergillus infections.
How To Say Trichocysts
 
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Learn how to say Trichocysts with EmmaSaying free pronunciation tutorials. Definition and meaning can be found here: https://www.google.com/search?q=define+Trichocysts
Views: 47 Emma Saying
Minuto Unesp267 Estudo amplia o conhecimento de ecoepidemiologia de patógeno
 
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Erivelto Correa de Araújo Júnior, da Faculdade de Medicina Veterinária da Unesp de Araçatuba, desenvolve pesquisa que aponta o pombo como hospedeiro da levedura Cryptococcus, agente causador de uma forma grave de meningite e meningo encefalite. Mais informações: www.unesp.br
Views: 340 unespvideos
Demystifying Medicine 2015 - Ebola: A Terrifying Challenge
 
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Demystifying Medicine 2015 - Ebola: A Terrifying Challenge Air date: Tuesday, January 27, 2015, 4:00:00 PM Category: Demystifying Medicine Runtime: 01:50:56 Description: The 2015 Demystifying Medicine Series, which is jointly sponsored by FAES and NIH, will begin January 6th and includes the presentation of patients, pathology, diagnosis and therapy in the context of major disease problems and current research. Primarily directed toward Ph.D. students, clinicians and program managers, the course is designed to help bridge the gap between advances in biology and their application to major human diseases. Each session includes clinical and basic science components presented by NIH staff and invitees. All students, fellows and staff are welcome, as well. For more information go to http://demystifyingmedicine.od.nih.gov Permanent link: http://videocast.nih.gov/launch.asp?18820
Views: 426 nihvcast
Vomitoma - Sporotrichinosis & Visceral Microtoxins
 
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Vomitoma & Proctalgia - 2009 - Split GOREGRIND GORENOISE
Vomitoma - 17 - Frozen Alive - Shattered With A Hammer
 
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Vomitoma & Streptococcus Pyogenes - Split CD
Views: 89 MAI GORENOISE

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