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Cryptography: The Science of Making and Breaking Codes
 
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There are lots of different ways to encrypt a message, from early, simple ciphers to the famous Enigma machine. But it’s tough to make a code truly unbreakable. Hosted by: Michael Aranda ---------- Dooblydoo thanks go to the following Patreon supporters -- we couldn't make SciShow without them! Shout out to Justin Ove, John Szymakowski, Fatima Iqbal, Justin Lentz, David Campos, and Chris Peters. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/scishow Or help support us by becoming our patron on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Instagram: http://instagram.com/thescishow Sources: http://www.vectorsite.net/ttcode_04.html#m3 http://www.simonsingh.net/The_Black_Chamber/crackingprinciple.html http://book.itep.ru/depository/crypto/Cryptography_history.pdf http://www.cs.trincoll.edu/~crypto/historical/gronsfeld.html http://www.sans.org/reading-room/whitepapers/vpns/history-encryption-730 http://ftp.stmarys-ca.edu/jsauerbe/m10s11/chapter5.pdf http://www.turing.org.uk/scrapbook/ww2.html http://enigma.louisedade.co.uk/howitworks.html http://www.codesandciphers.org.uk/enigma/example1.htm http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/military/how-enigma-works.html http://www.cs.miami.edu/~burt/learning/Csc609.051/notes/02.html
Views: 810147 SciShow
Cryptography For Beginners
 
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Cryptography is a complex and confusing subject. In this talk you will learn about the core components of cryptography used in software development: securing data with encryption, ensuring data integrity with hashes and digital signatures, and protecting passwords with key derivation functions. While learning how to use these components, you will also learn the best practices that drive strong cryptography. This talk won’t make you a cryptography expert but it will give you the knowledge necessary to use cryptography properly. No prior knowledge of cryptography is required for this presentation. EVENT: Dutch PHP Conference in 2018 SPEAKER: Adam Englander PERMISSIONS: Original video was published with the Creative Commons Attribution license (reuse allowed). CREDITS: Original video source: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KcjJ19geKmA
Views: 34735 Coding Tech
Cryptography: Crash Course Computer Science #33
 
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Today we’re going to talk about how to keep information secret, and this isn’t a new goal. From as early as Julius Caesar’s Caesar cipher to Mary, Queen of Scots, encrypted messages to kill Queen Elizabeth in 1587, theres has long been a need to encrypt and decrypt private correspondence. This proved especially critical during World War II as Allan Turing and his team at Bletchley Park attempted to decrypt messages from Nazi Enigma machines, and this need has only grown as more and more information sensitive tasks are completed on our computers. So today, we’re going to walk you through some common encryption techniques such as the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES), Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange, and RSA which are employed to keep your information safe, private, and secure. Note: In October of 2017, researchers released a viable hack against WPA2, known as KRACK Attack, which uses AES to ensure secure communication between computers and network routers. The problem isn't with AES, which is provably secure, but with the communication protocol between router and computer. In order to set up secure communication, the computer and router have to agree through what's called a "handshake". If this handshake is interrupted in just the right way, an attacker can cause the handshake to fault to an insecure state and reveal critical information which makes the connection insecure. As is often the case with these situations, the problem is with an implementation, not the secure algorithm itself. Our friends over at Computerphile have a great video on the topic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mYtvjijATa4 Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Want to know more about Carrie Anne? https://about.me/carrieannephilbin The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrash... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 214067 CrashCourse
Lecture 1: Introduction to Cryptography by Christof Paar
 
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For slides, a problem set and more on learning cryptography, visit www.crypto-textbook.com. The book chapter "Introduction" for this video is also available for free at the website (click "Sample Chapter").
How to Solve a Cryptogram - Twitterati Cryptograms
 
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How to solve cryptograms, cryptoquips, and cryptoquotes. For more puzzles, visit http://www.twitteraticryptograms.com.
Views: 30263 Tammy Donroe
Solving Cryptograms #1 | ASMR
 
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I dust off the cobwebs in this first episode of solving cryptograms for the first time in years in order to help you relax and sleep. Stay tuned for the Crossword Puzzles series... Patreon ► http://bit.ly/1EZgmNi Website: https://ephemeralrift.com Listen to selected works outside of YouTube: Spotify ► http://bit.ly/1V23U60 CDBaby ► http://bit.ly/1AUt3Jj iTunes ► http://apple.co/1xIHLNd Podcasts: EphemRadio (on hiatus) ► http://apple.co/2afSkZQ Arkham Sanitarium (on hiatus) ►http://apple.co/2alraeV Social Media: Facebook ► https://www.facebook.com/ephemeralrift1 Twitter ► https://twitter.com/EphemeralRift IG ► http://instagram.com/e.rift What is ASMR? ASMR stands for Autonomous Sensory Meridian Response. It's a non-scientific word that an everyday person came up with to describe the feeling characterized as a pleasurable tingling sensation felt in the head, scalp, back and other regions of the body in response to visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, and/or cognitive stimuli, such as crinkling bags, hand movements, whispering, personal attention or watching someone perform a task. It's like goosebumps but much more pleasant and without the uncomfortable chills. ASMR videos are meant to intentionally induce this sensation in the viewer, often referred to as "tingles", but the videos also serve to provide a relaxing, calming and soothing experience for the viewer. Many people who do not experience ASMR still enjoy the videos for their calming and sleepy effect.
Views: 272214 Ephemeral Rift
Famous UNCRACKED Codes That STILL Exist!
 
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Check out these famous uncracked codes that still exist! From secret riddles to unsolved mysteries, this top 10 list contains cryptography that's still unexplained today! Subscribe For New Videos! http://goo.gl/UIzLeB Watch our "Most CRAZY Things Ancient Egyptians Did!" video here: https://youtu.be/T0zERiMJFQo Watch our "Most CRAZY Things Ancient Greeks Did!" video here: https://youtu.be/-JkhVvn_dow Watch our "REAL Evidence That Aliens EXIST!" video here: https://youtu.be/dtwJT2eilx0 10. Chinese Gold Bar Cipher In 1933, General Wang in Shanghai, China, allegedly received seven gold bars. These gold bars appear to represent metal certificates related to a bank deposit with a U.S. Bank. The gold bars themselves have pictures, Chinese writing, some form of script writing, and cryptograms in Latin letters. Not surprisingly, experts debate concerning the validity of the claim for the deposit. It may help to resolve the dispute if someone can decipher the cryptograms on the bars. Someone translated the Chinese writing, which discusses a transaction in excess of $300,000,000. It also refers to these gold bars, which weigh a total of 1.8 kilograms. The rest remains a mystery. 9. D’agapeyeff Cipher The D’Agapeyeff cipher is an as-yet unbroken cipher that appears in the first edition of Codes and Ciphers, an elementary book on cryptography published by the Russian-born English cartographer Alexander D’Agapeyeff in 1939. Offered as a “challenge cipher” at the end of the book, it was not included in later editions. D’Agapeyeff supposedly admitted later to having forgotten how he had encrypted it. Some argue that the failure of all attempts at decryption is due to D’Agapeyeff incorrectly encrypting the original text. However, it has also been argued that the cipher may still be successfully attacked using computational methods such as genetic algorithms. Whatever those are. 8. The Beale Ciphers If this next one isn’t a hoax then the person who solves it could become very, very rich. This question of authenticity has bothered cryptoanalysts ever since these ciphers first appeared in an 1885 pamphlet called The Beale Papers, which recounts a fantastic story of buried treasure. According to the pamphlet, a man named Thomas Jefferson Beale, a man no one has proven even existed, discovered gold during an 1816 expedition into the American West. The treasure, as the story goes, was then transported to Bedford County, Virginia, and buried. The gold's secret location was allegedly provided by three cryptograms, of which one was already cracked. Unfortunately, the cracked code only detailed the type of treasure there and not a specific location. To find out anything more specific would involve cracking the two other ciphers. The problem is that figuring it out requires comparing them to unknown historical texts. The decrypted cipher, for example, used the Declaration of Independence. The first number, 115, corresponds with the first letter of the 115th word in the Declaration: "instituted." That means 115 stands for "I." So what are the translation texts for the other two ciphers? No one knows, and they may very well not exist at all. There are also questions over whether the other ciphers may just be unintelligible, as if the whole thing was made up by the pamphlet's author decades after the gold was supposed to have been discovered. 7. Dorabella In 1897, a 40-year-old composer named Edward Elgar sent an encrypted letter to 23-year-old Dora Penny, the stepdaughter of one of his friends. Why he sent it is part of the mystery and can only be answered if anyone ever cracks the code. To figure it out would involve deciphering 87 characters all made of strings of semi-circles oriented in different directions. Attempts at translating the cipher yielded a message just short of gibberish. Experts say that shorter ciphers are always harder to solve. Another theory has it that the code is an example of a distinct private language shared only between Penny and Elgar. If that's the case, then solving it may be simply impossible, since no one but them would understand the references. In 2016, a police officer in Cleveland believes he’s cracked at least part of the code, revealing a line of melody. Inspector Mark Pitt read 100 books on the Dorabella Cipher; he hopes to write one on his discoveries. Whether or not that’s really the meaning, though, remains to be seen. Origins Explained is the place to be to find all the answers to your questions, from mysterious events and unsolved mysteries to everything there is to know about the world and its amazing animals!
Views: 1246979 Origins Explained
What is Modular Arithmetic - Introduction to Modular Arithmetic - Cryptography - Lesson 2
 
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Modular Arithmetic is a fundamental component of cryptography. In this video, I explain the basics of modular arithmetic with a few simple examples. Learn Math Tutorials Bookstore http://amzn.to/1HdY8vm Donate - http://bit.ly/19AHMvX STILL NEED MORE HELP? Connect one-on-one with a Math Tutor. Click the link below: https://trk.justanswer.com/aff_c?offer_id=2&aff_id=8012&url_id=232 :)
Views: 155839 Learn Math Tutorials
Vigenere Cipher 1
 
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Encrypt the message MAKE IT HAPPEN using the Vigenėre cipher and key word MATH.
Views: 156549 MathAfterMath
What is cryptography? | Journey into cryptography | Computer Science | Khan Academy
 
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What is Cryptography? A story which takes us from Caesar to Claude Shannon. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/cryptography/crypt/v/caesar-cipher?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/algorithms/intro-to-algorithms/v/what-are-algorithms?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Computer Science on Khan Academy: Learn select topics from computer science - algorithms (how we solve common problems in computer science and measure the efficiency of our solutions), cryptography (how we protect secret information), and information theory (how we encode and compress information). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Computer Science channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8uHgAVBOy5h1fDsjQghWCw?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 792572 Khan Academy
Intro to Cryptology for kids: the science of making and breaking codes.
 
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*********************************************************************** Submit Secret Word: https://goo.gl/forms/e8H0rV8afWJp7pEi2 *********************************************************************** Printable Cryptography Wheels: https://drive.google.com/file/d/1buvUzXaY5sDwB_SALgMaSREm6C099UFh/view?usp=sharing *********************************************************************** What is cryptology? How it’s applied today? Cryptography provides a natural way to get students to discover certain key mathematical concepts and techniques on their own. Codes have been used for centuries and children are fascinated by intrigue and adventure. In this video I’ll show you the Enigma decoding machine, Navajo codes and different cryptographic techniques. Also you can take a look at the National Cryptologic museum in Maryland (USA). My video from USA Science & Engineering Festival: Day 2 https://youtu.be/M6JcmPFE_Cw Day 1 https://youtu.be/43zpoqrxxc4 ======================================================= Music: Griphop by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1100413 Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Views: 1594 zakUak
What is Cryptography - Introduction to Cryptography - Lesson 1
 
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In this video I explain the fundamental concepts of cryptography. Encryption, decryption, plaintext, cipher text, and keys. Learn Math Tutorials Bookstore http://amzn.to/1HdY8vm Donate - http://bit.ly/19AHMvX STILL NEED MORE HELP? Connect one-on-one with a Math Tutor. Click the link below: https://trk.justanswer.com/aff_c?offer_id=2&aff_id=8012&url_id=232 :)
Views: 99133 Learn Math Tutorials
Cryptography Lesson #1 - Block Ciphers
 
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This tutorial video will help provide an understanding of what block ciphers are, and how they are used in the field of cryptography.
Views: 139311 Ryan Kral
Cryptography Basically
 
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This is a video version of a lesson I used for my kids on the basics of cryptography. Hopefully it will be useful for others, either for teaching their kids, or just for a fun approach to the topic. The subject today is the One Time Pad. A later video will cover other techniques, like shared key and public key cryptography. If you want to play with the one time pad, I've put together a simple page to do so: http://www.snoyman.com/static/onetimepad/vue.html And if you have ideas for future videos, please feel free to leave them in the comments.
Views: 3442 Michael Snoyman
Cryptography for the masses: Nadim Kobeissi at TEDxMontreal
 
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(Sous-titres en français bientôt disponibles) Amid today's debate on electronic surveillance and the ongoing Arab Spring protests, this young 22 year old Montreal hacktivist founded Cryptocat, a free, accessible, and open source encrypted chat application. His mission: make private communication on the web available to all. Dans le contexte du printemps arabe et des enjeux de surveillance électronique, ce jeune cybertactiviste montréalais a fondé à l'âge 22 ans Cryptocat: un logiciel de conversation protégé par cryptographie simple à utiliser, gratuit et à code source ouvert. Sa mission: rendre accessible à tous la communication privée sur le web. https://twitter.com/kaepora https://crypto.cat/ For more information, please visit http://tedmontreal.com/ Introduction motion animation by: http://www.departement.ca/ In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 11900 TEDx Talks
Cryptography: The Math of the Public Private Key of RSA
 
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Thanks to all of you who support me on Patreon. You da real mvps! $1 per month helps!! :) https://www.patreon.com/patrickjmt !! Part 1: https://youtu.be/PkpFBK3wGJc Please consider being a supporter on Patreon! https://www.patreon.com/patrickjmt Twitter: @Patrick_JMT In this video I show mathematically for RSA encryption works by going through an example of sending an encrypted message! If you are interested in seeing how Euclid's algorithm would work, check out this video by Emily Jane: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fz1vxq5ts5I A big thanks to the 'Making & Science team at Google' for sponsoring this video! Please like and share using hashtag #sciencegoals
Views: 40848 patrickJMT
Quantum Cryptography in 6 Minutes
 
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Quantum Cryptography explained simply. Regular encryption is breakable, but not quantum cryptography. Today we'll look at the simplest case of quantum cryptography, quantum key distribution. It uses the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle to prevent eavesdroppers from cracking the code. Hi! I'm Jade. Subscribe to Up and Atom for new physics, math and computer science videos every week! *SUBSCRIBE TO UP AND ATOM* https://www.youtube.com/c/upandatom *Let's be friends :)* TWITTER: https://twitter.com/upndatom?lang=en *QUANTUM PLAYLIST* https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1lNrW4e0G8WmWpW846oE_m92nw3rlOpz *SOURCES* http://gva.noekeon.org/QCandSKD/QCandSKD-introduction.html https://www.sans.org/reading-room/whitepapers/vpns/quantum-encryption-means-perfect-security-986 https://science.howstuffworks.com/science-vs-myth/everyday-myths/quantum-cryptology.htm The Code Book - Simon Singh *MUSIC* Prelude No. 14 by Chris Zabriskie is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://chriszabriskie.com/preludes/ Artist: http://chriszabriskie.com/
Views: 21790 Up and Atom
Vinod Vaikuntanathan - Lattices and Cryptography:  A Match Made in Heaven
 
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Vinod Vaikuntanathan of the University of Toronto presented a talk titled: Lattices and cryptography: A match made in heaven at the 2014 PQCrypto conference in October, 2014. PQCrypto 2014 Book: http://www.springer.com/computer/security+and+cryptology/book/978-3-319-11658-7 Workshop: https://pqcrypto2014.uwaterloo.ca/ Find out more about IQC! Website - https://uwaterloo.ca/institute-for-qu... Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/QuantumIQC Twitter - https://twitter.com/QuantumIQC
NETWORK SECURITY - DES (DATA ENCRYPTION STANDARD) ALGORITHM
 
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DES algorithm follows the Feistel Structure Most of the Block cipher algorithms follows Feistel Structure BLOCK SIZE - 64 bits Plain Text No. of Rounds - 16 Rounds Key Size - 64 bits Sub Key Size - 48 bits No. of Sub Keys - 16 Sub Keys Cipher Text - 64 bits
Views: 156339 Sundeep Saradhi Kanthety
Chris Peikert - Lattice Cryptography for the Internet
 
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Chris Peikert of Georgia Institute of Technology presented a talk titled: Lattice cryptography for the internet at the 2014 PQCrypto conference in October, 2014. Abstract: In recent years, lattice-based cryptography has been recognized for its many attractive properties, such as strong provable security guarantees and apparent resistance to quantum attacks, flexibility for realizing powerful tools like fully homomorphic encryption, and high asymptotic efficiency. Indeed, several works have demonstrated that for basic tasks like encryption and authentication, lattice-based primitives can have performance competitive with (or even surpassing) those based on classical mechanisms like RSA or Diffie-Hellman. However, there still has been relatively little work on developing lattice cryptography for deployment in real-world cryptosystems and protocols. In this work, we take a step toward that goal, by giving efficient and practical lattice-based protocols for key transport, encryption, and authenticated key exchange that are suitable as "drop-in" components for proposed Internet standards and other open protocols. The security of all our proposals is provable based (sometimes in the random-oracle model) on the well-studied "leaning with errors over rings" problem, and hence on the conjectured worst-case hardness of problems on ideal lattices (against quantum algorithms). One of our main technical innovations (which may be of independent interest) is a simple, low-bandwidth reconciliation technique that allows two parties who "approximately agree" on a secret value to reach exact agreement, a setting common to essentially all lattice-bases encryption schemes. Our technique reduces the ciphertext length of prior (already compact) encryption schemes nearly twofold, at essentially no cost. PQCrypto 2014 Book: http://www.springer.com/computer/security+and+cryptology/book/978-3-319-11658-7 Workshop: https://pqcrypto2014.uwaterloo.ca/ Find out more about IQC! Website - https://uwaterloo.ca/institute-for-qu... Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/QuantumIQC Twitter - https://twitter.com/QuantumIQC
[Hindi] What is Cryptography ? | Kya hai cryptography ? | Explained in simple words
 
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Hello Dosto Aaj hum baat karenge cryptography ke bare me ki ye kya hota hai aur iska itemaal kaise aur kaha hota hai. iska sambandh kisi bhi data ya message ko safely pohchane se hota hai aur uski security badhayi jati hai taaki bich me koi an-adhikarik tarike se usko access na kar paye. aasha karta hoo apko ye video pasand ayegi agar aapko ye video achhi lage to isse like kare aur apne dosto ke sath share kare aur abhi tak aapne mera channel subscribe nahi kia hai to jarur is channel ko subscribe kare. Subscribe to my channel for more videos like this and to support my efforts. Thanks and Love #TechnicalSagar LIKE | COMMENT | SHARE | SUBSCRIBE ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For all updates : SUBSCRIBE Us on Technical Sagar : www.youtube.com/technicalsagarindia LIKE us on Facebook https://www.facebook.com/technicalsagarindia Follow us on Twitter : http://www.twitter.com/iamasagar
Views: 94266 Technical Sagar
This Is The Weirdest Unsolved Mystery Up To Date!
 
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There are many unsolved mysteries that everyone knows about. Who was Jack the Ripper? What’s in area 51? What IS the Bermuda Triangle? How does Paul Rudd look so young? Here are ten of the world’s weirdest unsolved mysteries. The question is: Which of these are the weirdest? 10. The Voynich Manuscript For all bibliophiles and language fanatics out there, the Voynich Manuscript is one of the world’s most engaging mysteries. Where and when this tatty old book was written is unknown, but cryptologists’ best guess is 15th Century Italy. But not only can we not be sure where & when it’s from, we have no idea what any of it says. The entire manuscript is written in a mysterious unknown language. Whether the manuscript is written in some long-lost language of the past, or in an all-new script of the author’s creation is unclear. All we know is that nobody yet has managed to crack the code. 240 pages of untranslatable text, it’s the single-most infamous case in cryptology history. So, what is it? Harry Potter 8? A third Bible testament? Shakespeare’s long last sequel to Love Labour’s Lost? Most evidence suggests it’s something related to alchemy. Those alchemists were up to all sorts! Who knows what wonders we may find within, if it’s ever decoded? 9. Francis Leavy’s Handprint Some mysteries concern people or things vanishing without a trace, but this one concerns something that just won’t go away. In April 1924, the usually chipper Chicago Firefighter Francis Leavy had a strange turn of heart. A moody disposition took hold. Whilst washing one of the station’s windows he stopped, pressed his hand against the glass and told his colleagues he had been hit with a strange feeling that he would die that day. Leavy’s premonition was right. At 7pm that evening Leavy and his fellow officers raced to a four-storey building known as Curran’s Hall that was consumed in flames. Leary died, on duty, when the roof caved it. Upon returning to the station, Firefighters saw Leavy’s handprint still on the window. Not so mysterious. But what IS mysterious is that no-matter how hard they tried to wash the window- the hand print never went away. Leavy refused to be forgotten. His handprint remained, for two whole decades. Maybe Leavy’s ghostly spirit lived on. Or maybe he just had REALLY dirty hands. 8. Overtoun Bridge Overtoun Bridge in Scotland is no ORDINARY bridge. This bridge is the Bermuda Triangle of dogs. Since the 1950’s an estimated 50 dogs have, when being walked across the bridge, spontaneously hurled themselves over the edge- tumbling to their death. Canine psychologist Dr. Sands has examined every inch of the bridge and the land below, taking into account smell and sound. What is it the dogs can smell or hear that we can’t? What is it that’s driving so many dogs to suicide? Dr. Sands noted that the surrounding foliage could make the area look, from a dog’s lower eye line, like flat ground- meaning they didn’t know they were jumping from such a great height. That, combined with the odour of male mink urine, is luring dogs to jump in the hope of catching a mink, only to tumble into the abyss below. But local hunter John Joyce is not convinced, adamantly insisting there are no mink in the area, leading to other theories. That part of Scotland has a long history of paranormal myths: fairies, spirits, ghosts. Could an ethereal otherworldly creature be summoning them away to doggo heaven? Or maybe they just all HATE their owners… 7. The Pennsylvania UFO Incident In 1965, citizens of six separate U.S. states reporting seeing a huge fireball in the sky. If one or two people reported it you could maybe say they were not of their right mind, it was the 60’s after all. But enough people reported it to warrant a thorough investigation. Sadly, those hoping for an alien landing were left disappointed. They claimed it was nothing but a meteor burning up in the atmosphere. Despite this- something definitely landed. After decades of mystery and intrigue, in 2005 NASA finally admitted that they examined the area and had found fragments they determined to be from a crashing Russian Satellite. Mystery solved? Right? Not quite. Not aiding their story was that when asked to show records of their findings, they claimed to have lost the records in the 90’s. Following a court order under the Freedom of Information Act, NASA tried to find the records. 6. ???? 5. ??? 4. ??? 3. ??? 2. ?? 1. ? ► For copyright matters please contact us: [email protected] ► FOLLOW US ON TWITTER: https://twitter.com/Top5sFinest ► LIKE US ON FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/TheFinestPost/ Background Music By: Kevin MacLeod: https://goo.gl/gWj3Zo Thank you so much for watching! Smash that like button for more, make sure you share the video with your friends and dont forget to subscribe!
Views: 10841 The Finest
The Science of Secrecy from Ancient Egypt to Quantum Cryptography (1999)
 
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Simon Lehna Singh MBE (born 19 September 1964) is a British popular science author whose works largely contain a strong mathematical element. His written works include Fermat's Last Theorem (in the United States titled Fermat's Enigma: The Epic Quest to Solve the World's Greatest Mathematical Problem),[2][3] The Code Book[4] (about cryptography and its history), Big Bang[5] (about the Big Bang theory and the origins of the universe), Trick or Treatment? Alternative Medicine on Trial[6] (about complementary and alternative medicine, co-written by Edzard Ernst) and The Simpsons and Their Mathematical Secrets (about mathematical ideas and theorems hidden in episodes of The Simpsons and Futurama).[7] In 2012 Singh founded the Good Thinking Society.[8] Singh has also produced documentaries and works for television to accompany his books, is a trustee of NESTA, the National Museum of Science and Industry and co-founded the Undergraduate Ambassadors Scheme. Singh's parents emigrated from Punjab, India to Britain in 1950. He is the youngest of three brothers, his eldest brother being Tom Singh, the founder of the UK New Look chain of stores. Singh grew up in Wellington, Somerset, attending Wellington School, and went on to Imperial College London, where he studied physics. He was active in the student union, becoming President of the Royal College of Science Union.[9] Later he completed a PhD degree in particle physics at Emmanuel College, Cambridge and at CERN, Geneva. In 1983, he was part of the UA2 experiment in CERN.[11] In 1987, Singh taught science at The Doon School, the independent all-boys' boarding school in India.[12] In 1990 Singh returned to England and joined the BBC's Science and Features Department, where he was a producer and director working on programmes such as Tomorrow's World and Horizon. Singh was introduced to Richard Wiseman through their collaboration onTomorrow's World. At Wiseman's suggestion, Singh directed a segment about politicians lying in different mediums, and getting the public's opinion on if the person was lying or not. After attending some of Wiseman's lectures, Singh came up with the idea to create a show together, and Theatre of Science was born. It was a way to deliver science to normal people in an entertaining manner. Richard Wiseman has influenced Singh in such a way that Singh states: My writing initially was about pure science but a lot of my research now has been inspired by his desire to debunk things such as the paranormal – we both hate psychics, mediums, pseudoscience in general.[13] Singh directed his BAFTA award-winning documentary about the world's most notorious mathematical problem entitled "Fermat's Last Theorem" in 1996. The film was memorable for its opening shot of a middle-aged mathematician, Andrew Wiles, holding back tears as he recalled the moment when he finally realised how to resolve the fundamental error in his proof of Fermat's Last Theorem. The documentary was originally transmitted in October 1997 as an edition of the BBC Horizon series. It was also aired in America as part of the NOVA series. The Proof, as it was re-titled, was nominated for an Emmy Award. The story of this celebrated mathematical problem was also the subject of Singh's first book, Fermat's last theorem. In 1997, he began working on his second book, The Code Book, a history of codes and codebreaking. As well as explaining the science of codes and describing the impact of cryptography on history, the book also contends that cryptography is more important today than ever before. The Code Book has resulted in a return to television for him. He presented The Science of Secrecy, a five-part series for Channel 4. The stories in the series range from the cipher that sealed the fate of Mary, Queen of Scots, to the coded Zimmermann Telegram that changed the course of the First World War. Other programmes discuss how two great 19th century geniuses raced to decipher Egyptian hieroglyphs and how modern encryption can guarantee privacy on the Internet. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simon_Singh Image: Sam Hughes [CC BY 2.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0)], via Wikimedia Commons
Views: 2546 Way Back
Caesar Cipher
 
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This tutorial will teach you how to encrypt and decrypt messages using the Caesar Cipher.-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/ . Make your own animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 143292 Lacey Wright
Make Your Own Encryption Program
 
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📖📕 GET THE NEW TINKERNUT BOOK: http://bit.ly/Tinkernutbook 📕📖 This video lays out the steps for creating a very simple encryption and decryption program using free tools. The programming language we will be using is VB Script. See if you can decrypt this text: wkjlue#vnrro#huxwxi#uxr\ You can find all the code for this program as well as an alternative for Apple computers at the project page: http://www.tinkernut.com/archives/4193
Views: 101258 Tinkernut
Cryptography and privacy. An easy explanation on how to create a key for encryption.
 
02:28
Cryptography is the base for most of our communications online. It's what keeps your messages and your activities private. In this video we explain how cryptography encodes your message using a key and exactly how this key works.
Views: 9628 MinuteVideos
Dorothie & Martin Hellman: "Peace, True Love.... and Cryptography" | Talks at Google
 
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Turing Award winner Martin Hellman, along with his wife Dorothie, discuss their book, “A New Map for Relationships: Creating True Love at Home & Peace on the Planet,” and how they went from being madly in love at first, to heading for divorce, then madly in love again--explaining how the same lessons they had to learn in their marriage can help avert worldwide catastrophes such as global warming and nuclear war. Former US Ambassador to Afghanistan Karl Eikenberry has referred to the Hellman’s work as, “the most thoughtful, unique, and fascinating book I have ever read on personal and international diplomacy.” Stories from Marty’s work in cryptography help illustrate ethical dilemmas and the importance of “getting curious, not furious.” “A New Map” can be downloaded for free at: https://anewmap.com/ Dorothie Hellman worked as a CPA at Touche Ross, later becoming a full-time volunteer and VP for Financial Support at the Beyond War Foundation from 1982-87. Since then, she has devoted her life to studying how to improve the human condition. Martin Hellman is best known for his invention, with Diffie and Merkle, of public key cryptography, to enable secure Internet transactions. He currently works on reducing existential risks posed by technology, with an emphasis on nuclear weapons. He is Professor Emeritus of EE at Stanford University, and was awarded the Turing Award in 2015.
Views: 1658 Talks at Google
The Enigma Machine Explained
 
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As technology increases, so do the methods of encryption and decryption we have at our disposal. World War II saw wide use of various codes from substitution ciphers to employing Navajo code talkers in the Pacific theater. Here, science journalist and author Simon Singh demonstrates the German enigma machine, a typewriter-like device used to encrypt communications. He demonstrates not only its operation, but both the strength and fatal flaws in its method. Watch the Full Program Here: https://youtu.be/nVVF8dgKC38 Original Program Date: June 4, 2011 The World Science Festival gathers great minds in science and the arts to produce live and digital content that allows a broad general audience to engage with scientific discoveries. Our mission is to cultivate a general public informed by science, inspired by its wonder, convinced of its value, and prepared to engage with its implications for the future. Subscribe to our YouTube Channel for all the latest from WSF. Visit our Website: http://www.worldsciencefestival.com/ Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/worldsciencefestival Follow us on twitter: https://twitter.com/WorldSciFest
Views: 488858 World Science Festival
The Caesar cipher | Journey into cryptography | Computer Science | Khan Academy
 
02:36
Brit explains the Caesar cipher, the first popular substitution cipher, and shows how it was broken with "frequency analysis" Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/cryptography/crypt/v/polyalphabetic-cipher?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/computing/computer-science/cryptography/crypt/v/intro-to-cryptography?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=computerscience Computer Science on Khan Academy: Learn select topics from computer science - algorithms (how we solve common problems in computer science and measure the efficiency of our solutions), cryptography (how we protect secret information), and information theory (how we encode and compress information). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Computer Science channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC8uHgAVBOy5h1fDsjQghWCw?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 597147 Khan Academy
21. Cryptography: Hash Functions
 
01:22:01
MIT 6.046J Design and Analysis of Algorithms, Spring 2015 View the complete course: http://ocw.mit.edu/6-046JS15 Instructor: Srinivas Devadas In this lecture, Professor Devadas covers the basics of cryptography, including desirable properties of cryptographic functions, and their applications to security. License: Creative Commons BY-NC-SA More information at http://ocw.mit.edu/terms More courses at http://ocw.mit.edu
Views: 72391 MIT OpenCourseWare
How to Create a Crossword Puzzle | WIRED
 
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New York Times crossword puzzle constructor (also known as a cruciverbalist), David Kwong, shows us how he makes a crossword puzzle. David Kwong is a New York Times crossword constructor and magician. His show in New York City, The Enigmatist, is an immersive evening of puzzle-solving, cryptology, and illusions. Visit https://enigmatistshow.com/ for more info. Still haven’t subscribed to WIRED on YouTube? ►► http://wrd.cm/15fP7B7 Also, check out the free WIRED channel on Roku, Apple TV, Amazon Fire TV, and Android TV. Here you can find your favorite WIRED shows and new episodes of our latest hit series Masterminds. ABOUT WIRED WIRED is where tomorrow is realized. Through thought-provoking stories and videos, WIRED explores the future of business, innovation, and culture. How to Create a Crossword Puzzle | WIRED
Views: 563526 WIRED
symmetric key cryptography
 
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https://8gwifi.org/CipherFunctions.jsp Reference book: http://leanpub.com/crypto Cryptographic Algorithms generally fall into one of two different categories, or are a combination of both. Symmetric Fast Only provide confidentiality Examples: DES, AES, Blowfish, RC4, RC5 Asymmetric Large mathematical operations make it slower than symmetric algorithms No need for out of band key distribution (public keys are public!) Scales better since only a single key pair needed per individual Can provide authentication and nonrepudiation Examples: RSA, El Gamal, ECC, Diffie-Hellman problem with symmetric key cryptography DES (Data Encryption Standard) 64 bit key that is effectively 56 bits in strength Actual algorithm is called DEA (Data Encryption Algorithm) DES Modes Electronic Code Book Cipher Block Chaining (most commonly used for general purpose encryption) Cipher Feedback Output Feedback Counter Mode (used in IPSec) 3DES 112-bit effective key length Uses either 2 or 3 different smaller keys in one of several modes Modes EEE2/3 EDE2/3 AES NIST replaced DES in 1997 with this Uses the Rijndael algorithm Supports key/block sizes of 128, 192, and 256 bits Uses 10/12/14 rounds as block size increases IDEA (International Data Encryption Algorithm) Operates on 64 bit blocks in 8 rounds with 128 bit key Considered stronger than DES and is used in PGP Blowfish 64 bit block cipher with up to 448 bit key and 16 rounds Designed by Bruce Schneier RC4 Stream cipher with variable key size created by Ron Rivest RC5 Another Rivest cipher Block cipher with 32/64/128 bit blocks and keys up to 2048 bits RC6 Beefier version of RC5 submitted as AES candidate CAST 64 bit block cipher with keys between 40-128 bits with 12-16 rounds depending on key length CAST-256 used 128-bit blocks and keys from 128-256 bits using 48 rounds SAFER (Secure and Fast Encryption Routine) Set of patent-free algorithms in 64 and 128 bit block variants Variation used in Bluetooth Twofish Adapted version of Blowfish with 128 bit blocks, 128-256 bit keys and 16 rounds AES Finalist Kryptografie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel symmetric key cryptography symmetric key cryptography tutorial symmetric key cryptography example symmetric key cryptography vs asymmetric key cryptography symmetric and asymmetric key cryptography symmetric key cryptography Kryptografie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel Kryptographie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel Kryptographie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel Kryptografie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel und asymmetrische Schlüsselkryptographie symmetrische und asymmetrische Schlüsselkryptographie Kryptografie mit symmetrischem Schlüssel
Views: 41365 Zariga Tongy
Cryptography Basics: Definitions, History & Attacks (Cryptography Crashcourse Part 1)
 
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Book: Understanding Cryptography https://www.amazon.com/Understanding-Cryptography-Textbook-Students-Practitioners/dp/3642041000/ref=as_li_ss_tl?ie=UTF8&qid=1541146284&sr=8-1&keywords=Understanding+Cryptography:+A+Textbook+for+Students+and+Practitioners&linkCode=sl1&tag=julianhosp-20&linkId=8e14aad9056003d3eefcacb57c2e0b73&language=en_US ---------- New to cryptocurrencies? You might want to read this book first! http://cryptofit.community/cryptobook If you liked the video, subscribe to my channel, give a "thumbs up" and share this video to make the world together #cryptofit :) ► Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCseN... ► Cryptocurrency Exchange: https://www.binance.com/?ref=11272739 ► Hardware Wallet: http://www.julianhosp.com/hardwallet ► Ruben's Trinkgeld Adressen: Bitcoin: 3MNWaot64Fr1gRGxv4YzHCKAcoYTLXKxbc Litecoin: MTaGwg5EhKooonoVjDktroiLqQF6Rvn8uE --------------- ► Completely NEW? What is Blockchain, Bitcoin and Co? Get this book from me: https://www.amazon.com/Cryptocurrenci... ► Join our Facebook group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/crypt... ► iTunes Podcast: https://itunes.apple.com/sg/podcast/t... ► My website: http://www.julianhosp.com ---------------- My name is Dr. Julian Hosp or just Julian. My videos are about Bitcoin, Ethereum, Blockchain and crypto currencies in general, to avoid scam, rip-off and fraud especially in mining. I'm talking about how you can invest wisely and do it rationally and simply. My ultimate goal is to make people all around the world #CRYPTOFIT. I.E fit for this new wave of decentralization and blockchain. Have fun! ► Follow me here and stay in touch: Facebook: www.facebook.com/julianhosp/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/julianhosp Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/julianhosp/ Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/julianhosp
Views: 1891 Dr. Julian Hosp
Solving The MYSTERY BOX Cryptex Puzzle!!
 
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Today I decided to try my luck and open up the Mystery Box Cryptex Puzzle by Bad Robot and Theory 11. This beautiful box contains a mystery within a mystery! Would you open it or leave it locked forever?! Also.. Secret section at the end...Enjoy! Mystery Box: https://store.theory11.com/products/mysterybox Mystery Box Playing cards: http://amzn.to/2FJ0ice INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/chrisramsay52 TWITTER: https://www.twitter.com/chrisramsay52 LEARN A TRICK I CREATED HERE: https://sellfy.com/p/OiqQ/ LIKED A SONG I USED? GET IT HERE: http://share.epidemicsound.com/Ramsay GAMING CHANNEL: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCxR3TcpkooMIllA2b83kGAQ/featured MY CAMERA: http://amzn.to/2D0bVtU BEST LENS FOR VLOGS: http://amzn.to/2DeNzth BIG LENS FOR B-ROLL: http://amzn.to/2ANaqcA TOP DOWN CAM: http://amzn.to/2COakmY MIC: http://amzn.to/2AKIHJQ TRIPOD: http://amzn.to/2EuP9GO Website: https://www.chris-ramsay.com IF YOU WANT TO SEND ME STUFF: Chris Ramsay CP 50011 BP. Galeries Des Monts St-Sauveur, PQ Canada J0R 1R0
Views: 3375138 Chris Ramsay
The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown Part 1 (Full Audio Book)
 
08:29:44
The Da Vinci Code is a 2003 mystery thriller novel by Dan Brown. It follows "symbologist" Robert Langdon and cryptologist Sophie Neveu after a murder in the Louvre Museum in Paris causes them to become involved in a battle between the Priory of Sion and Opus Dei over the possibility of Jesus Christ having been a companion to Mary Magdalene.
Views: 2723 AudioBooks & Films
Quantum Cryptography Explained
 
08:13
This episode is brought to you by Squarespace: http://www.squarespace.com/physicsgirl With recent high-profile security decryption cases, encryption is more important than ever. Much of your browser usage and your smartphone data is encrypted. But what does that process actually entail? And when computers get smarter and faster due to advances in quantum physics, how will encryption keep up? http://physicsgirl.org/ ‪http://twitter.com/thephysicsgirl ‪http://facebook.com/thephysicsgirl ‪http://instagram.com/thephysicsgirl http://physicsgirl.org/ Help us translate our videos! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?c=UC7DdEm33SyaTDtWYGO2CwdA&tab=2 Creator/Editor: Dianna Cowern Writer: Sophia Chen Animator: Kyle Norby Special thanks to Nathan Lysne Source: http://gva.noekeon.org/QCandSKD/QCand... http://physicsworld.com/cws/article/n... https://epic.org/crypto/export_contro... http://fas.org/irp/offdocs/eo_crypt_9... Music: APM and YouTube
Views: 272280 Physics Girl
How to Multiply  in Modular Arithmetic - Cryptography - Lesson 5
 
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In this tutorial, I demonstrate two different approaches to multiplying numbers in modular arithmetic. Learn Math Tutorials Bookstore http://amzn.to/1HdY8vm Donate - http://bit.ly/19AHMvX STILL NEED MORE HELP? Connect one-on-one with a Math Tutor. Click the link below: https://trk.justanswer.com/aff_c?offer_id=2&aff_id=8012&url_id=232 :)
Views: 33677 Learn Math Tutorials
DaVinci Code Novel Review by Karthi DaVinci | Vetridam | Book Review
 
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DaVinci Code Novel Review by Karthi DaVinci Use these following link to Buy Original Books: DaVinci Code in Tamil : https://amzn.to/2IHYJYG Inferno (Naragam) in Tamil : https://amzn.to/2KyhGPo The Da Vinci Code (The Young Adult Adaptation) : https://amzn.to/2lLBuEc Angels & Demons: A Novel (Robert Langdon) : https://amzn.to/2lJ6PHu The Da Vinci Code is a 2003 mystery-detective novel by Dan Brown. It follows symbologist Robert Langdon and cryptologist Sophie Neveu after a murder in the Louvre Museum in Paris, when they become involved in a battle between the Priory of Sion and Opus Dei over the possibility of Jesus Christ having been a companion to Mary Magdalene. The title of the novel refers, among other things, to the finding of the first murder victim in the Grand Gallery of the Louvre, naked and posed similar to Leonardo da Vinci's famous drawing, the Vitruvian Man, with a cryptic message written beside his body and a pentacle drawn on his chest in his own blood. Follows : Twitter- https://twitter.com/Vetridambooks Facebook- https://www.facebook.com/Vetridam Youtube - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCesxtG87N95Iy3K4uLrSQaw Like, Share & Subscribe #Vetridam #Tamil_Books #Tamil_Book_Review
Views: 15903 Vetridam
Cybersecurity: Crash Course Computer Science #31
 
12:30
Cybersecurity is a set of techniques to protect the secrecy, integrity, and availability of computer systems and data against threats. In today’s episode, we’re going to unpack these three goals and talk through some strategies we use like passwords, biometrics, and access privileges to keep our information as secure, but also as accessible as possible. From massive Denial of Service, or DDos attacks, to malware and brute force password cracking there are a lot of ways for hackers to gain access to your data, so we’ll also discuss some strategies like creating strong passwords, and using 2-factor authentication, to keep your information safe. Check out Computerphile’s wonderful video on how to choose a password! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3NjQ9b3pgIg Pre-order our limited edition Crash Course: Computer Science Floppy Disk Coasters here! https://store.dftba.com/products/computer-science-coasters Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Want to know more about Carrie Anne? https://about.me/carrieannephilbin The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrash... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 392336 CrashCourse
Creating An Unbreakable Cipher (nearly)
 
07:52
Creating Ciphers can be fun, but understanding how they work by using a simple example of developing a cipher is a great way to understand them. This video covers the development of a cipher algorithm and shows how to make it (nearly) unbreakable.
Cryptography 101 - Substitution Ciphers
 
11:12
In this video we look at substitution ciphers: how they are made and how to break them.
Views: 62154 Pico Cetef
Stanford Seminar - The Evolution of Public Key Cryptography
 
01:14:30
EE380: Computer Systems Colloquium Seminar The Evolution of Public Key Cryptography Speaker: Martin Hellman, Stanford EE (Emeritus) While public key cryptography is seen as revolutionary, after this talk you might wonder why it took Whit Diffie, Ralph Merkle and Hellman so long to discover it. This talk also highlights the contributions of some unsung (or "under-sung") heroes: Ralph Merkle, John Gill, Stephen Pohlig, Richard Schroeppel, Loren Kohnfelder, and researchers at GCHQ (Ellis, Cocks, and Williamson). Resources and Reading Materials M. E. Hellman, Cybersecurity, Nuclear Security, Alan Turing, and Illogical Logic (http://www-ee.stanford.edu/ %7Ehellman/publications/77.pdf), Communications of the ACM, Vol. 60, No. 12, pp. 52-59, December 2017. This is a written version of Martin Hellman's ACM Turing Lecture (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I132wSwAI3o) and was accompanied by a short (6 minute) video (https://vimeo.com/241030842). Other materials and hard to find references can be found on Martin Hellman's Stanford website, http://www-ee.stanford.edu/~hellman/ . About the Speaker: Martin E. Hellman is Professor Emeritus of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University and is affiliated with the university's Center for International Security and Cooperation (CISAC). His recent technical work has focused on bringing a risk informed framework to a potential failure of nuclear deterrence and then using that approach to find surprising ways to reduce the risk. His earlier work included co- inventing public key cryptography, the technology that underlies the secure portion of the Internet. His many honors include election to the National Academy of Engineering and receiving (jointly with his colleague Whit Diffie) the million dollar ACM Turing Award, the top prize in computer science. His most recent project is a book, jointly written with his wife of fifty years, "A New Map for Relationships: Creating True Love at Home & Peace on the Planet," that provides a "unified field theory" of peace by illuminating the connections between nuclear war, conventional war, interpersonal war, and war within our own psyches. For more information about this seminar and its speaker, you can visit https://ee380.stanford.edu/Abstracts/180307.html Support for the Stanford Colloquium on Computer Systems Seminar Series provided by the Stanford Computer Forum. Colloquium on Computer Systems Seminar Series (EE380) presents the current research in design, implementation, analysis, and use of computer systems. Topics range from integrated circuits to operating systems and programming languages. It is free and open to the public, with new lectures each week. Learn more: http://bit.ly/WinYX5
Views: 1962 stanfordonline
Lecture 35   Introduction to Basic Cryptography by NPTEL IIT MADRAS
 
22:38
Like the video and Subscribe to channel for more updates. Recommended Books (4 Books , Please buy any product (not limited to the books) by going through the below links to support the channel going): The Tangled Web – A Guide to Securing Modern Web Applications http://amzn.to/2yU13u7 The Web Application Hacker's Handbook: Finding and Exploiting Security Flaws, 2ed http://amzn.to/2kfm0Hj Computer Security: Art and Science http://amzn.to/2yaXRGZ Fundamentals of Database System http://amzn.to/2yaS984 Help the channel Grow by buying anything through the above links
Views: 152 KNOWLEDGE TREE
History - Secrets Exposed - Cryptology - WWII Code breaking
 
12:36
From VOA Learning English, this is EXPLORATIONS in Special English. I'm Jeri Watson. And I'm Jim Tedder. Today we visit a small museum in the American state of Maryland. It is called the National Cryptologic Museum. There you will find information that was once secret. The National Cryptologic Museum is on Fort George G. Meade, a military base near Washington, DC. It tells the story of cryptology and the men and women who have worked in this unusual profession. The word cryptology comes from the Greek "kryptos logos." It means "hidden word." Cryptology is writing or communicating in ways designed to hide the meaning of your words. The museum has many examples of equipment that was once used to make information secret. It also has equipment that was developed to read secret messages. The method of hiding exact meanings is called coding. People have used secret codes throughout history to protect important information. One display at the museum explains American attempts to read Japanese military information during World War Two. Japan's Navy used special machines to change its written information into secret codes. This coded information was then sent by radio to navy ships and military bases. The information included secret military plans and orders. The leaders of the Japanese Navy believed no one could read or understand the secret codes. They were wrong. Americans were working very hard to learn the Japanese code. The United States urgently needed to break the code to learn what Japan was planning. In 1940, an American woman named Genevieve Grotjan found some information being repeated in Japanese coded messages. At the time, she was a civilian working for the government in Washington, DC. Her discovery helped the United States understand secret Japanese diplomatic messages. After the United States understood the code, it was possible to study messages from the Japanese ambassador to Germany and to his supervisors in Japan. After the attack on Pearl Harbor, an American Naval officer named Joseph Rochefort struggled to understand the Japanese navy code. He worked on the American base at Pearl Harbor. It was early in 1942. The American naval commander in the Pacific Ocean was Chester Nimitz. His forces were much smaller than the Japanese Naval forces. And the Japanese had been winning many victories. Joseph Rochefort had worked for several months to read the secret Japanese Naval code called JN-25. If he could understand enough of the code, he would be able to give Admiral Nimitz very valuable information. The admiral could use this information to plan for battle. By the early part of the year, Mr. Rochefort and the men who worked with him could read a little less than 20 percent of the Japanese JN-25 code. Joseph Rochefort had the evidence he needed. "AF" was now known to be the island of Midway. He also told Admiral Nimitz the Japanese would attack Midway on June third. The admiral secretly moved his small force to an area near Midway and waited for the Japanese Navy. The battle that followed was a huge American victory. Experts now say the Battle of Midway was the beginning of the American victory in the Pacific. That victory was possible because Joseph Rochefort learned to read enough of the Japanese code to discover the meaning of the letters "AF." One American code has never been broken. Perhaps it never will. It was used in the Pacific during World War Two. For many years the government would not discuss this secret code. Listen for a moment to this very unusual code. Then you may understand why the Japanese military forces were never able to understand any of it. The code is in the voice of a Native American. The man you just heard is singing a simple song in the Navajo language. Very few people outside the Navajo nation are able to speak any of their very difficult language. At the beginning of World War Two, the United States Marine Corps asked members of the Navajo tribe to train as Code Talkers. The Cryptologic Museum says the Marine Corps Code Talkers could take a sentence in English and change it into their language in about 20 seconds. A code machine needed about 30 minutes to do the same work. The Navajo Code Talkers took part in every battle the Marines entered in the Pacific during World War Two. The Japanese were very skilled at breaking codes. But they were never able to understand any of what they called "The Marine Code." Perhaps the most famous is a World War Two German code machine called the Enigma. The word "enigma" means a puzzle or a problem that is difficult to solve. The German military used the Enigma machine to communicate orders and plans. The United States, Britain, and the government of Poland cooperated in learning to read information sent by the Enigma. It took thousands of people and cost millions of dollars to read the Enigma information. This is a VOA product and is in the public domain
Views: 6341 ListenAndReadAlong
The Da Vinci Code by Dan Brown Part 2  (Full Audio Book)
 
08:31:03
The Da Vinci Code is a 2003 mystery thriller novel by Dan Brown. It follows "symbologist" Robert Langdon and cryptologist Sophie Neveu after a murder in the Louvre Museum in Paris causes them to become involved in a battle between the Priory of Sion and Opus Dei over the possibility of Jesus Christ having been a companion to Mary Magdalene.
Views: 729 AudioBooks & Films
Why the NSA is breaking our encryption -- and why we should care | Matthew Green | TEDxMidAtlantic
 
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This talk was given at a local TEDx event, produced independently of the TED Conferences. Encryption dates back to the Founding Fathers and the Bill of Rights. Now, the United States National Security Agency is breaking and undermining core encryption technologies that power the Internet, saying it's being done for our own protection from terrorists. But are we sacrificing our freedoms for fear? Matthew Green is an Assistant Research Professor of Computer Science at the Johns Hopkins University. His research focuses on computer security and cryptography, and particularly the way that cryptography can be used to promote individual privacy. His work includes techniques to securely access medical databases, enhance the anonymity of Bitcoin, and to analyze deployed security systems. Prior to joining the Johns Hopkins faculty he served as a Senior Technical Staff Member at AT&T Laboratories. About TEDx, x = independently organized event In the spirit of ideas worth spreading, TEDx is a program of local, self-organized events that bring people together to share a TED-like experience. At a TEDx event, TEDTalks video and live speakers combine to spark deep discussion and connection in a small group. These local, self-organized events are branded TEDx, where x = independently organized TED event. The TED Conference provides general guidance for the TEDx program, but individual TEDx events are self-organized.* (*Subject to certain rules and regulations)
Views: 138927 TEDx Talks
Cryptography
 
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Google IT Support Professional Certificate Course 6 - IT Security: Defense against the digital dark arts, Module 2 - Cryptology To get certificate subscribe at: https://www.coursera.org/specializations/google-it-support ================= The whole course playlist: Google IT Support Professional Certificate https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2jykFOD1AWZlfwMPcVKwaFrRXbqObI3U ================= IT Security https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL2jykFOD1AWaEXEpyRf-Im3U8WQ962Y4B ================= https://www.facebook.com/cyberassociation/ https://scsa.ge/en/online-courses/ This six-course certificate, developed exclusively by Google, includes innovative curriculum designed to prepare you for an entry-level role in IT support. A job in IT can mean in-person or remote help desk work, either in a small business or at a global company, like Google. Whether you’ve been tinkering with IT or are completely new to the field, you’ve come to the right place. If you’re looking for a job, upon completion of the certificate, you can share your information with top employers, like Bank of America, Walmart, Sprint, GE Digital, PNC Bank, Infosys, TEKsystems, UPMC, and, of course, Google. Course 6 - IT Security: Defense against the digital dark arts About the Course This course covers a wide variety of IT security concepts, tools, and best practices. It introduces threats and attacks and the many ways they can show up. We’ll give you some background of encryption algorithms and how they’re used to safeguard data. Then, we’ll dive into the three As of information security: Authentication, authorization, and accounting. We’ll also cover network security solutions, ranging from firewalls to Wifi encryption options. The course is rounded out by putting all these elements together into a multi-layered, in-depth security architecture, followed by recommendations on how to integrate a culture of security into your organization or team. At the end of this course, you’ll understand: - how various encryption algorithms and techniques work and their benefits and limitations. - various authentication systems and types. - the difference between authentication and authorization. At the end of this course, you’ll be able to: - evaluate potential risks and recommend ways to reduce risk. - make recommendations on how best to secure a network. - help others to understand security concepts and protect themselves Who is this class for: This program is intended for beginners who are interested in developing the skills necessary to perform entry-level IT support. No pre-requisite knowledge is required. However, if you do have some familiarity with IT, you can skip through any content that you might already know and speed ahead to the graded assessments. Module 2 - Cryptology In the second module of this course, we'll learn about cryptology. We'll explore different types of encryption practices and how they work. We'll show you the most common algorithms used in cryptography and how they've evolved over time. By the end of this module, you'll understand how symmetric encryption, asymmetric encryption, and hashing work; you'll also know how to choose the most appropriate cryptographic method for a scenario you may see in the workplace. Learning Objectives • Understand the how symmetric encryption, asymmetric encryption, and hashing work. • Describe the most common algorithms of cryptography. • Choose the most appropriate cryptographic method given a scenario.
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Lecture 8: Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) by Christof Paar
 
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For slides, a problem set and more on learning cryptography, visit www.crypto-textbook.com. The AES book chapter for this video is also available at the web site (click Sample Chapter).