Home
Search results “Determining 1 to 1 functions of blood”
Blood, Part 1 - True Blood: Crash Course A&P #29
 
10:00
Now that we've talked about your blood vessels, we're going to zoom in a little closer and talk about your blood itself. We'll start by outlining the basic components of blood -- including erythrocytes, leukocytes, platelets, and plasma -- as well as the basic process of hemostasis that stops bleeding, and how antigens are responsible for the blood type that you have. By the end of this episode, you should be totally prepared for your next blood drive. Table of Contents The Basic Components of Blood 2:30 Erythrocytes, Leukocytes, Platelets, and Plasma 3:00 The Basic Process of Hemostasis 4:45 How Antigens Are Responsible For Your Blood Type 6:21 *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Jan Schmid, Simun Niclasen, Robert Kunz, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Eric Kitchen, Christian, Beatrice Jin, Anna-Ester Volozh, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Stephen Lawless, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Jessica Wode, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, SR Foxley, Christy Huddleston, Steve Marshall, Chris Peters -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1400565 CrashCourse
Haematology - The Red Blood Cell Count
 
07:37
This programme demonstrates in a video lesson the procedure in determining whether there is adequate number of red blood cell in circulation. The procedure covers the description of the laboratory instruments and materials that are used in such tests. At the end of the procedure, an observation of the test result is made and interpreted with the use of a microscope.
Views: 222506 OER Africa
The Heart, part 1 - Under Pressure: Crash Course A&P #25
 
10:08
Your heart gets a lot of attention from poets, songwriters, and storytellers, but today Hank's gonna tell you how it really works. The heart’s ventricles, atria, and valves create a pump that maintains both high and low pressure to circulate blood from the heart to the body through your arteries, and bring it back to the heart through your veins. You'll also learn what your blood pressure measurements mean when we talk about systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Table of Contents Heart's Ventricles, Atria and Valves Create a Pump 3:25 Maintains Both High and Low Pressure 3:25 Blood Circulates From the Heart to the Body Through Your Arteries 4:47 Blood Circulates From the Body to the Heart Through Your Veins 4:49 Systolic and Diastolic Blood Pressure 7:58 Crash Course Psychology posters available now at DFTBA.com! http://www.dftba.com/crashcourse *** Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Jan Schmid, Anna-Ester Volozh, Robert Kunz, Jason A Saslow, Christian Ludvigsen, Chris Peters, Brad Wardell, Beatrice Jin, Roger C. Rocha, Eric Knight, Jessica Simmons, Jeffrey Thompson, Elliot Beter, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Ian Dundore, Jessica Wode, SR Foxley, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, Steve Marshall ***SUBBABLE MESSAGES*** TO: My Student FROM: Earle Check out www.youtube.com/amorsciendi for supplementary content. -- TO: Everyone FROM: Magnus Krokstad Keep dreaming! ***SUPPORTER THANK YOU!*** Thank you so much to all of our awesome supporters for their contributions to help make Crash Course possible and freely available for everyone forever: Damian Shaw, Taylor Garget, Emily Barker, Librarifan, Damian Shaw, Courtney Spurgeon, juliagraph, Katherine Allen, Stephen DeCubellis, Vanessa Benavent -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 2591861 CrashCourse
Blood Type (ABO and Rh) Made Simple!
 
29:41
This video covers the basics of blood typing, including descriptions of the ABO system and the Rh system!
Views: 276744 Simple Science Answers
Counting Cells with a Hemocytometer
 
06:31
There can be tens of thousands of cells in one milliliter of culture medium. So how are cells counted? The process requires diluting the cell culture, dying the cells, and loading the cells into a hemocytometer. A hemocytometer is a modified microscope slide with two chambers. Each chamber is divided into 9 squares. There are specific guidelines for counting cells within the squares. In this video, we'll demonstrate the process of counting cells using a hemocytometer. We'll also work through some of the typical calculations that accompany cell counting. Our hope is that after viewing this video, you will feel more confident and be better prepared to try counting cells in a hands-on lab experience. Practice using our FREE virtual hemocytometer: http://www.ncbionetwork.org/educational-resources/elearning/interactive-elearning-tools/counting-cells-using-hemocytometer This video was filmed on location at Rowan-Cabarrus Community College.
Views: 394485 BioNetwork
What are Blood Types?
 
03:05
Quick Questions explains why, when it comes right down to it, there are really only eight kinds of people in the world. ---------- Like SciShow? Want to help support us, and also get things to put on your walls, cover your torso and hold your liquids? Check out our awesome products over at DFTBA Records: http://dftba.com/artist/52/SciShow Or help support us by subscribing to our page on Subbable: https://subbable.com/scishow ---------- Looking for SciShow elsewhere on the internet? Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/scishow Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/scishow Tumblr: http://scishow.tumblr.com Thanks Tank Tumblr: http://thankstank.tumblr.com Sources: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK2261/ http://www.nobelprize.org/educational/medicine/landsteiner/readmore.html http://anthro.palomar.edu/blood/Rh_system.htm http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002223.htm http://www.rcsb.org/pdb/101/motm.do?momID=21 http://learn.genetics.utah.edu/content/inheritance/blood/ http://www.northshore.org/community-events/donating-blood/blood-types/ http://www.redcrossblood.org/learn-about-blood/blood-types
Views: 1405804 SciShow
7 Early Symptoms of a Serious Disease You Must Know
 
04:25
The human body is made so that it sends us signals as symptoms to let us know something’s wrong. Sadly, many of us overlook such signs, thinking it’ll be all right anyway. That’s why we gathered several symptoms that may signal cancer – we recommend taking them very seriously. However, if you see any of these in yourself or one of your close ones, don’t jump to conclusions. Many of them may speak to very different diseases, so it’s still best to consult a doctor. TIMESTAMPS Skin neoplasms 0:45 A persistent cough 1:19 Skin itching 1:45 Bowel function changes 2:08 Secretions when urinating 2:30 Abrupt weight loss 2:50 A persistent sore throat 3:26 SUMMARY - Neoplasms are considered to be a sign of skin or breast cancer. Other symptoms include: • Hard knots in the breast and/or armpits. • Irritation or rash of unknown origin that’s not associated with a food or cosmetic allergy. • A decrease in appetite. • Abrupt body weight loss. • A uterine neoplasm causes genital itching. • Brain cancer may provoke itching in the nostrils. • Mucous or purulent secretions. • Spontaneous defecation. • Pain in the kidneys. • Chronic weakness. • Hoarseness of speech proceeding to loss of voice. • Coughing up blood, bad breath. Keep in mind that these observations can’t and shouldn’t be used to diagnose yourself because they may be associated with other diseases. However, if you’ve noticed any of the above, don’t ignore them. Consult your doctor, and have yourself examined. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC  ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 580569 BRIGHT SIDE
Blood Types
 
10:46
Paul Andersen explains the importance of blood types in blood transfusions. He starts with a brief discussion of blood antigens and antibodies. He describes how the ABO differs from the Rh blood type. He shows you how to solve simple genetic problems using Punnett squares. He then talks about the percentage distribution of the different types and the problems that may result during pregnancy. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License
Views: 666363 Bozeman Science
Tissues, Part 1: Crash Course A&P #2
 
10:43
•••SUBBABLE MESSAGE••• TO: Jordan Schoonover FROM: Mom, Dad & Madison Happy Birthday Jordan! We love you sweetheart!! *** You can directly support Crash Course at http://www.subbable.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Also, if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing great content. *** In this episode of Crash Course Anatomy & Physiology, Hank gives you a brief history of histology and introduces you to the different types and functions of your body's tissues. -- Table of Contents: Nervous, Muscle, Epithelial & Connective Tissues 1:23 History of Histology 2:07 Nervous Tissue Forms the Nervous System 5:17 Muscle Tissue Facilitates All Your Movements 7:00 Identifying Samples 9:03 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 2300362 CrashCourse
Histology for Beginners
 
43:41
Created to help those learning how to identify tissues under the microscope. Produced May 19th, 2014 by Dr Ren Hartung at Glen Oaks Community College. The quiz portion starts at 33:09
Views: 302773 Ren Hartung
Lung Auscultation Landmarks, Sounds, Placement Nursing | Assessing Lungs Part 1
 
20:18
Lung auscultation of assessing lung sounds that includes auscultation landmarks, sounds, stethoscope placement for nursing students and nurses. In this video, you will learn lung anatomy, auscultation points of the lungs for the anterior and posterior view of the lungs, normal breath sounds vs abnormal breath sounds with each including an audio clip. The normal breath sounds covered are: bronchial, bronchovesicular, vesicular. The abnormal breath sounds covered are: discontinuous lung sounds such as coarse crackles (rales), fine crackles (rales), and pleural friction rub. The continuous lung sounds include: polyphonic, high-pitched wheeze (sibilant wheeze), monophonic, low-pitched wheeze (rhonchi or sonorous wheeze), and stridor. Lung Sound Quiz: http://www.registerednursern.com/lung-sounds-quiz/ Notes: http://www.registerednursern.com/lung-auscultation-points-sounds/ Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=registerednursern Nursing School Supplies: http://www.registerednursern.com/the-ultimate-list-of-nursing-medical-supplies-and-items-a-new-nurse-student-nurse-needs-to-buy/ Nursing Job Search: http://www.registerednursern.com/nursing-career-help/ Visit our website RegisteredNurseRN.com for free quizzes, nursing care plans, salary information, job search, and much more: http://www.registerednursern.com Check out other Videos: https://www.youtube.com/user/RegisteredNurseRN/videos Popular Playlists: NCLEX Reviews: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWtwCDmLHyX2UeHofCIcgo0 Fluid & Electrolytes: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWJSZ9pL8L3Q1dzdlxUzeKv Nursing Skills: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUhd_qQYEbp0Eab3uUKhgKb Nursing School Study Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfWBO40qeDmmaMwMHJEWc9Ms Nursing School Tips & Questions" https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVQok-t1X5ZMGgQr3IMBY9M Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUkW_DpJekN_Y0lFkVNFyVF Types of Nursing Specialties: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfW8dRD72gUFa5W7XdfoxArp Healthcare Salary Information: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVN0vmEP59Tx2bIaB_3Qhdh New Nurse Tips: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVTqH6LIoAD2zROuzX9GXZy Nursing Career Help: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfVXjptWyvj2sx1k1587B_pj EKG Teaching Tutorials: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU-A9UTclI0tOYrNJ1N5SNt Personality Types: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfU0qHnOjj2jf4Hw8aJaxbtm Dosage & Calculations for Nurses: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfUYdl0TZQ0Tc2-hLlXlHNXq Diabetes Health Managment: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLQrdx7rRsKfXtEx17D7zC1efmWIX-iIs9
Views: 601370 RegisteredNurseRN
Probability: Example 1
 
15:20
In this video I go over an example on determining whether a function is a Probability Density Function (PDF) as well as determine the probability that the random variable lies within a given range. As explained in my last video, the probability density function is modeled from real world experimental data so to ensure that the function given is actually a PDF, we need to ensure it meets the following two conditions: 1) The function is always positive. 2) The area under the function is equal to 1. This is a useful video for understanding PDFs and proving that a given function is one. I also go over some very interesting algebra techniques in solving the example without needing to use a calculator, so make sure to watch this video! Download the notes in my video: https://1drv.ms/b/s!As32ynv0LoaIhr5womcvwVHbh8-CAA Related Videos: Probability: Introduction: https://youtu.be/H_sfVMH0VpQ Probability that my friend Dmitry Scores Goals: http://youtu.be/zbAN04Kj3D8 Three Prisoners Problem: http://youtu.be/8vY66MD7nsM Odds of Having a Perfect NCAA March Madness Bracket: http://youtu.be/It1sCq9cAFM Odds of Winning the Lottery: http://youtu.be/dVNFhu6tMQc Blood Flow: Poiseuille's Law: https://youtu.be/X6aU0p7wJzI Applications of Integrals: Hydrostatic Pressure and Force: https://youtu.be/fesMt6vmXIo Applications of Integrals: Surface Area: https://youtu.be/JkDPmAD37qk Applications of Integrals: Arc Length Function: https://youtu.be/MWKK3qLvSwU Applications of Integrals: Arc Length Proof: https://youtu.be/2rb4H_rmgxg Approximate Integration: Simpson's Rule: Proof: https://youtu.be/aDvSpOHQoLU . ------------------------------------------------------ SUBSCRIBE via EMAIL: https://mes.fm/subscribe DONATE! ʕ •ᴥ•ʔ https://mes.fm/donate Like, Subscribe, Favorite, and Comment Below! Follow us on: Official Website: https://MES.fm Steemit: https://steemit.com/@mes Gab: https://gab.ai/matheasysolutions Minds: https://minds.com/matheasysolutions Twitter: https://twitter.com/MathEasySolns Facebook: https://fb.com/MathEasySolutions Google Plus: https://mes.fm/gplus LinkedIn: https://mes.fm/linkedin Pinterest: https://pinterest.com/MathEasySolns Instagram: https://instagram.com/MathEasySolutions Email me: [email protected] Try our Free Calculators: https://mes.fm/calculators BMI Calculator: https://bmicalculator.mes.fm Grade Calculator: https://gradecalculator.mes.fm Mortgage Calculator: https://mortgagecalculator.mes.fm Percentage Calculator: https://percentagecalculator.mes.fm Try our Free Online Tools: https://mes.fm/tools iPhone and Android Apps: https://mes.fm/mobile-apps
Haematology White Blood Cell Count
 
06:14
Course : Pharmacological Lab procedures: Haematology White Blood Cell Count KNUST OER 2011. CC:BY-NC This test is to determine whether there is adequate-number of white blood cells in the circulation, a white cell count is carried out. Blood cell counts are traditionally expressed as the number of cells per cubic milliliter of blood. The full course module is available at http://web.knust.edu.gh/oer/pages/index.php?siteid=knustoer&page=find_materials&cou=22 This is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial 3.0 License http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/ Find more at http://web.knust.edu.gh/oer
Views: 203233 knust oer
The GenoType Diet: Determining Blood Type
 
07:49
Short film on how to use the Home Blood Typing Kit to determine your blood type.
Views: 133493 GenoTypeDiet
Cardiac Output, Stroke volume, EDV, ESV, Ejection Fraction
 
03:00
Cardiac Physiology Basics. This video and other related images/videos (in HD) are available for instant download licensing here: https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/galleries/images-videos-by-medical-specialties/cardiology-and-vascular-diseases ©Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved. Voice by: Sue Stern. Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia CARDIAC OUTPUT is the amount of blood pumped by each ventricle in one minute. It is the product of STROKE VOLUME – the amount of blood pumped in one heartbeat, and HEART RATE – the number of beats in one minute. An INcrease in either stroke volume or heart rate results in INcreased cardiac output, and vice versa. For example, during physical exercises, the heart beats faster to put out more blood in response to higher demand of the body. It is noteworthy that the ventricles do NOT eject ALL the blood they contain in one beat. In a typical example, a ventricle is filled with about 100ml of blood at the end of its load, but only 60ml is ejected during contraction. This corresponds to an EJECTION fraction of 60%. The 100ml is the end-DIASTOLIC volume, or EDV. The 40ml that remains in the ventricle after contraction is the end-SYSTOLIC volume, or ESV. The stroke volume equals EDV minus ESV, and is dependent on 3 factors: contractility, preload, and afterload. Contractility refers to the force of the contraction of the heart muscle. The more forceful the contraction, the more blood it ejects. PRELOAD is RELATED to the end-diastolic volume. Preload, by definition, is the degree of STRETCH of cardiac myocytes at the end of ventricular filling, but since this parameter is not readily measurable in patients, EDV is used instead. This is because the stretch level of the wall of a ventricle INcreases as it’s filled with more and more blood; just like a balloon - the more air it contains, the more stretched it is. According to the Frank-Starling mechanism, the greater the stretch, the greater the force of contraction. In the balloon analogy, the more inflated the balloon, the more forceful it releases air when deflated. AFTERLOAD, on the other hand, is the RESISTANCE that the ventricle must overcome to eject blood. Afterload includes 2 major components: - Vascular pressure: The pressure in the left ventricle must be GREATER than the systemic pressure for the aortic valve to open. Similarly, the pressure in the right ventricle must exceed pulmonary pressure to open the pulmonary valve. In hypertension for example, higher vascular pressures make it more difficult for the valves to open, resulting in a REDUCED amount of ejected blood. - Damage to the valves, such as stenosis, also presents higher resistance and leads to lower blood output. All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.
Views: 178211 Alila Medical Media
Alere Determine HIV 1/2 Test - No Blood, Chase Buffer Only
 
03:31
I received an interesting question: Will the control line appear if we only put chase buffer but no blood? So we conducted a little experiment to find out. In this video, you see an Alere Determine HIV 1/2 Rapid Test. We added chase buffer only. And......
Views: 11115 Dr Tan & Partners
Immunology  - Introduction to Antibodies
 
07:07
https://www.facebook.com/ArmandoHasudungan Support me: http://www.patreon.com/armando Instagram: http://instagram.com/armandohasudungan Twitter: https://twitter.com/Armando71021105
Views: 256073 Armando Hasudungan
PUBG Mobile: 10 Tips & Tricks The Game Doesn't Tell You
 
06:39
With PUBG still being huge on PC and Xbox One, the player base is about to get huge-r(?) with PlayerUnknown's Battlegrounds launching on mobile. Not only does this port feature everything you'd expect in the PC and Xbox Versions, it's got a few things up it's sleeve too! For more awesome content, check out: http://whatculture.com/gaming Catch us on Facebook at: https://www.facebook.com/whatculturegaming And follow us on Twitter @wculturegaming
Views: 3352357 WhatCulture Gaming
Liver Function Tests (LFTs) Explained Clearly by MedCram.com
 
11:32
Understand liver function tests (LFT) with clear illustrations from Dr. Roger Seheult of http://www.medcram.com. Includes discussion of direct (conjugated) and indirect (unconjugated) bilirubin, cholestasis, alkaline phosphatase, GGT, Gilbert's syndrome, jaundice, and more. This video on liver function tests is lecture 2 of 4 on the liver. Speaker: Roger Seheult, MD Clinical and Exam Preparation Instructor Board Certified in Internal Medicine, Pulmonary Disease, Critical Care, and Sleep Medicine. MedCram: Medical topics explained clearly including: Asthma, COPD, Acute Renal Failure, Mechanical Ventilation, Oxygen Hemoglobin Dissociation Curve, Hypertension, Shock, Diabetic Ketoacidosis (DKA), Medical Acid Base, VQ Mismatch, Hyponatremia, Liver Function Tests, Pulmonary Function Tests (PFTs), Adrenal Gland, Pneumonia Treatment, any many others. New topics are often added weekly- please subscribe to help support MedCram and become notified when new videos have been uploaded. Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=medcramvideos Recommended Audience: Health care professionals and medical students: including physicians, nurse practitioners, physician assistants, nurses, respiratory therapists, EMT and paramedics, and many others. Review for USMLE, MCAT, PANCE, NCLEX, NAPLEX, NDBE, RN, RT, MD, DO, PA, NP school and board examinations. More from MedCram: Complete Video library: https://www.youtube.com/c/medcram Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MedCram Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/1/+Medcram Twitter: https://twitter.com/MedCramVideos Produced by Kyle Allred PA-C Please note: MedCram medical videos, medical lectures, medical illustrations, and medical animations are for medical educational and exam preparation purposes, and not intended to replace recommendations by your health care provider.
Positive Alere Determine HIV 1/2 Test
 
05:02
Live run of Alere Determine HIV 1/2 test showing a positive result. 9 seconds -- blood applied 24 seconds -- chase buffer applied 58 seconds -- faint line appearing in patient window 1 minute 30 seconds -- line is obvious and unmistakable 4 minutes -- faint line appearing in control window 5 minutes -- both lines are obvious and unmistakable
Views: 94980 Dr Tan & Partners
What is MONOCYTE? What does MONOCYTE mean? MONOCYTE meaning, definition & explanation
 
05:29
BROWSE The Internet EASY way with The Audiopedia owned Lightina Browser Android app. INSTALL NOW - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.LightinaBrowser_8083351 Source: Wikipedia.org article, adapted under https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ license. Monocytes are a type of white blood cell, or leukocyte. They are the largest type of leukocyte and can differentiate into macrophages or dendritic cells. As a part of the vertebrate innate immune system monocytes also influence the process of adaptive immunity. There are at least three types of monocyte in human blood. Monocytes are amoeboid in appearance, and have a granulated cytoplasm. Containing unilobar nuclei, these cells are one of the types of mononuclear leukocytes which shelter azurophil granules. The archetypal geometry of the monocyte nucleus is ellipsoidal; metaphorically bean-shaped or kidney-shaped, although the most significant distinction is that the nuclear envelope should not be hyperbolically furcated into lobes. Contrast to this classification occurs in polymorphonuclear leukocytes. Monocytes compose 2% to 10% of all leukocytes in the human body and serve multiple roles in immune function. Such roles include: replenishing resident macrophages under normal conditions; migration within approximately 8–12 hours in response to inflammation signals from sites of infection in the tissues; and differentiation into macrophages or dendritic cells to effect an immune response. In an adult human, half of the monocytes are stored in the spleen. Monocytes are generally identified in stained smears by the large kidney shaped or notched nucleus. These change into macrophages after entering into appropriate tissue spaces, and can transform into foam cells in endothelium . Monocytes are produced by the bone marrow from precursors called monoblasts, bipotent cells that differentiated from hematopoietic stem cells. Monocytes circulate in the bloodstream for about one to three days and then typically move into tissues throughout the body. They constitute between three and eight percent of the leukocytes in the blood. Half of them are stored as a reserve in the spleen in clusters in the red pulp's Cords of Billroth. In the tissues, monocytes mature into different types of macrophages at different anatomical locations. Monocytes are the largest corpuscles in the blood. Monocytes which migrate from the bloodstream to other tissues will then differentiate into tissue resident macrophages or dendritic cells. Macrophages are responsible for protecting tissues from foreign substances, but are also suspected to be important in the formation of important organs like the heart and brain. They are cells that possess a large smooth nucleus, a large area of cytoplasm, and many internal vesicles for processing foreign material. Monocytes and their macrophage and dendritic-cell progeny serve three main functions in the immune system. These are phagocytosis, antigen presentation, and cytokine production. Phagocytosis is the process of uptake of microbes and particles followed by digestion and destruction of this material. Monocytes can perform phagocytosis using intermediary (opsonising) proteins such as antibodies or complement that coat the pathogen, as well as by binding to the microbe directly via pattern-recognition receptors that recognize pathogens. Monocytes are also capable of killing infected host cells via antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity. Vacuolization may be present in a cell that has recently phagocytized foreign matter. Many factors produced by other cells can regulate the chemotaxis and other functions of monocytes. These factors include most particularly chemokines such as monocyte chemotactic protein-1 and monocyte chemotactic protein-3 (CCL7); certain arachidonic acid metabolites such as Leukotriene B4 and members of the 5-Hydroxyicosatetraenoic acid and 5-oxo-eicosatetraenoic acid family of OXE1 receptor agonists (e.g., 5-HETE and 5-oxo-ETE); and N-Formylmethionine leucyl-phenylalanine and other N-formylated oligopeptides which are made by bacteria and activate the formyl peptide receptor 1. Microbial fragments that remain after such digestion can serve as antigens. The fragments can be incorporated into MHC molecules and then trafficked to the cell surface of monocytes (and macrophages and dendritic cells). This process is called antigen presentation and it leads to activation of T lymphocytes, which then mount a specific immune response against the antigen. Other microbial products can directly activate monocytes and this leads to production of pro-inflammatory and, with some delay, of anti-inflammatory cytokines. Typical cytokines produced by monocytes are TNF, IL-1, and IL-12.
Views: 30485 The Audiopedia
DNA, Chromosomes, Genes, and Traits: An Intro to Heredity
 
08:18
Explore DNA structure/function, chromosomes, genes, and traits and how this relates to heredity! Video can replace old DNA structure & function video and in addition covers foundational concepts of heredity. Expand details for video handout: http://www.amoebasisters.com/handouts and table of contents. Table of Contents: Intro to Heredity 1:34 What is a trait? 2:08 Traits can be influenced by environment 2:15 DNA Structure 3:25 Genes 5:32 Some examples of proteins that genes code for 5:54 Chromosomes 6:37 Recap 7:18 To learn more about heredity including dominant and recessive traits, alleles, and probabilities in inheritance, see our full playlist here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fcGDUcGjcyk&list=PLwL0Myd7Dk1FVxYPO_bVbk8oOD5EZ2o5W Support us on Patreon! http://www.patreon.com/amoebasisters Our FREE resources: GIFs: http://www.amoebasisters.com/gifs.html Handouts: http://www.amoebasisters.com/handouts.html Comics: http://www.amoebasisters.com/parameciumparlorcomics Connect with us! Website: http://www.AmoebaSisters.com Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/AmoebaSisters Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/AmoebaSisters Tumblr: http://www.amoebasisters.tumblr.com Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/AmoebaSister­s Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/amoebasistersofficial/ Visit our Redbubble store at http://www.amoebasisters.com/store.html The Amoeba Sisters videos demystify science with humor and relevance. The videos center on Pinky's certification and experience in teaching science at the high school level. Pinky's teacher certification is in grades 4-8 science and 8-12 composite science (encompassing biology, chemistry, and physics). Amoeba Sisters videos only cover concepts that Pinky is certified to teach, and they focus on her specialty: secondary life science. For more information about The Amoeba Sisters, visit: http://www.amoebasisters.com/about-us.html We cover the basics in biology concepts at the secondary level. If you are looking to discover more about biology and go into depth beyond these basics, our recommended reference is the FREE, peer reviewed, open source OpenStax biology textbook: https://openstax.org/details/books/biology P.S. On our website, we emphasize that our videos contain science comics- not scientific illustrations. In real life, amoebas don't look like our characters. Our illustrated cell cartoons are definitely not to scale. Nitrogen and carbon don't tap dance. DNA is right-handed (but there are exceptions- worth a google) and doesn't have eyes...a face...or a top hat... Learn more about the purpose of our videos here: http://www.amoebasisters.com/our-videos.html We take pride in our AWESOME community, and we welcome feedback and discussion. However, please remember that this is an education channel. See YouTube's community guidelines https://www.youtube.com/yt/policyandsafety/communityguidelines.html and YouTube's policy center https://support.google.com/youtube/topic/2676378?hl=en&ref_topic=6151248. We also reserve the right to remove comments with vulgar language. Music is this video is listed free to use/no attribution required from the YouTube audio library https://www.youtube.com/audiolibrary/music?feature=blog We have YouTube's community contributed subtitles feature on to allow translations for different languages, and we are thankful for those that contribute different languages! YouTube automatically credits the different language contributors below (unless the contributor had opted out of being credited). We are not affiliated with any of the translated subtitle credits that YouTube may place below. If you have a concern about community contributed contributions, please contact us.
Views: 328623 Amoeba Sisters
10 Signs Your Kidneys Are Crying for Help
 
11:55
Your body sends you cries for help when something isn't working the way it should. Here’s a list of 10 signs which indicate that your kidneys aren’t working properly. Show some love to these bean-shaped organs by watching the video till the end! Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ SMART Youtube: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Have you ever seen a talking slime? Here he is – Slick Slime Sam: https://goo.gl/zarVZo ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 3447299 BRIGHT SIDE
Six types of enzymes | Chemical Processes | MCAT | Khan Academy
 
07:04
Enzymes are often named for their reactions, and you can often discern the function of an enzyme from its name. We will learn about six types of enzymes based on the type of reaction they catalyze. By Ross Firestone. Created by Ross Firestone. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/chemical-processes/enzymes/v/an-introduction-to-enzyme-kinetics?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=mcat Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/mcat/chemical-processes/enzymes/v/the-induced-fit-model-of-enzyme-catalysis?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=mcat MCAT on Khan Academy: Go ahead and practice some passage-based questions! About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s MCAT channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDkK5wqSuwDlJ3_nl3rgdiQ?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 364095 khanacademymedicine
Putting it all together: Pressure, flow, and resistance | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
11:50
See how pressure, flow, and resistance relate to one another and how they each affect the human body. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy. Created by Rishi Desai. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/nclex-rn-circulatory-system/rn-circulatory-system/v/thermoregulation-in-the-circulatory-system?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/nclex-rn-circulatory-system/rn-circulatory-system/v/resistance-in-a-tube?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 351499 khanacademymedicine
What is blood pressure? | Circulatory system physiology | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
06:21
Find out what a systolic and diastolic blood pressure mean. Rishi is a pediatric infectious disease physician and works at Khan Academy. Created by Rishi Desai. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/nclex-rn-circulatory-system/blood-pressure/v/learn-how-a-stethoscope-can-help-determine-blood-pressure?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/nclex-rn-circulatory-system/rn-circulatory-system/v/thermoregulation-in-the-circulatory-system?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 323720 khanacademymedicine
GLOMERULAR FILTRATION made easy!!
 
07:02
A step-by-step tutorial about glomerular filtration. Includes an overview of glomerular filtration rate (GFR), discussing how Starling forces (hydrostatic and oncotic pressure) lead to filtration being favoured. FUNCTION OF THE NEPHRON made easy!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UVlXX-9x7Q Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCC_8OQncpInqJPFKqyzjW_A Like ^_^ facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/biomedsessions 0:47 Ultrafiltration Barrier 2:36 Starling Forces (hydrostatic & oncotic pressure) 4:41 Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR)
Views: 335486 Biomed Sessions
The Normal Distribution and the 68-95-99.7 Rule
 
08:10
Thanks to all of you who support me on Patreon. You da real mvps! $1 per month helps!! :) https://www.patreon.com/patrickjmt !! The Normal Distribution and the 68-95-99.7 Rule. In this video, I talk about the normal distribution and what percentage of observed values fall within either 1, 2, or 3 standard deviations from the mean. One specific example is discussed. For more free math video, visit http://PatrickJMT.com
Views: 647183 patrickJMT
Heart Anatomy Part 1
 
06:55
Heart Anatomy Part 1 by Dr. Fabian Check out new Heart video by Dr Fabian in HD https://youtu.be/WyKBFWYKRBY
Views: 928906 lochness128
Endocrine System, part 1 - Glands & Hormones: Crash Course A&P #23
 
10:25
Hank begins teaching you about your endocrine system by explaining how it uses glands to produce hormones. These hormones are either amino-acid based and water soluble, or steroidal and lipid-soluble, and may target many types of cells or just turn on specific ones. He will also touch on hormone cascades, and how the HPA axis effects your stress response. Table of Contents Endocrine System 2:32 Glands Produce Hormones 2:58 Amino Acid Based and Water Soluble 4:18 Steroidal and Lipid Soluble 4:44 Hormone Cascades 6:15 HPA Axis Effects Your Stress Response 6:30 *** Crash Course Psychology Poster: http://www.dftba.com/crashcourse *** Crash Course is now on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark Brouwer, Jan Schmid, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Sandra Aft, Brad Wardell, Christian Ludvigsen, Robert Kunz, Jason, A Saslow, Jacob Ash, Jeffrey Thompson, Jessica Simmons, James Craver, Simun Niclasen, SR Foxley, Roger C. Rocha, Nevin, Spoljaric, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jessica Wode ***SUBBABLE MESSAGES*** TO: Laura Hewett FROM: Amy Paez Greetings from the other side of the world! DFTBA -- TO: Wesley FROM: G Distance is created by the Desert Otherworld, therefore we shall not be destroyed. ***SUPPORTER THANK YOU!*** Thank you so much to all of our awesome supporters for their contributions to help make Crash Course possible and freely available for everyone forever: Mickey Maloney, Dan Smalley, Stephen DeCubellis, Vanessa Benavent, Andrew Galante, LankySam!, David Costello, Vanessa Benavent, Kenzo Yasuda, Tessa White -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 2299598 CrashCourse
Alveoli: Gas Exchange
 
03:25
Revision notes and practice question for gas exchange: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/gas-exchange-11804216 Follow me on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sciencesauce_online/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/science_sauce Facebook: https://facebook.com/sciencesauceonline/ The alveoli ("many alveoli", "one alveolus") are the sites of gas exchange in the lungs. They are tiny air sacks sometimes described as being cauliflower-shaped. Oxygen diffuses across the lining of the alveoli and blood capillaries into and into red blood cells. Carbon dioxide diffuses from the blood to the alveoli. A concentration gradient is maintained by breathing as well as blood flow. The main adaptation of the gas exchange surface are: 1. Large surface area 2. Thin wall 3. Moist lining 4. Good blood supply 5. Good ventilation
Views: 161437 Science Sauce
Testis and Epididymis -  Male Reproductive Anatomy Part 1
 
06:45
Testis and Epididymis - Male Reproductive Anatomy Part 1 LIKE US ON FACEBOOK : fb.me/Medsimplified BUY USING AFFILIATE LINKS : AMAZON US--- https://goo.gl/XSJtTx AMAZON India http://goo.gl/QsUhku FLIPKART http://fkrt.it/Wiv8RNNNNN FLIPKART MOBILE APP http://fkrt.it/Wiv8RNNNNN Subscribe here - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOmrniWfKi-uCD6Oh6fqhgw The testis is the male gland important for both reproductive and endocrine functions. Initially, it begins as an undifferentiated gonad in the retroperitoneal area. Transcription of the SRY gene (testis-determining factor region) on the Y chromosome ultimately leads to sex differentiation. Without the SRY gene, the gonad would develop into an ovary. As the fetus develops, the functioning testis produces the male hormone testosterone to allow development of male genitalia. Over the last 3 months of gestation, the testis must course its way down from its original retroperitoneal position to its final destination in the scrotum. During its journey it must pass through the peritoneum, abdominal wall via the inguinal canal, and into the scrotal pouch. The testis is a paired, ovoid male reproductive organ that sits in the scrotum, separated from its mate by a scrotal septum. Described by some as being shaped and sized like a large olive or small plum, the average volume of the adult testis is approximately 25 mL. Typically, it measures 3.5-5 cm in length by 2.5-3 cm in both width by 3cm in depth The tunica vaginalis testis (a remnant of the processus vaginalis) envelopes the testis in a double layer, except at the superior and posterior borders where the spermatic cord and epididymis adhere to the testes. The visceral layer of the tunica vaginalis testis is closely applied to the testis, epididymis, and ductus deferens. On the posterolateral surface of the testis, this layer invests a slit-like recess between the body of the epididymis and the testis that is called the sinus of epididymis.[5] The parietal layer of tunica vaginalis is adjacent to the internal spermatic fascia, is more extensive, and extends superiorly into the distal part of the spermatic cord. Deep to the tunica vaginalis, the tunica albuginea is a tough, fibrous outer covering of the testis. On the posterior surface, it is reflected inwardly to form an incomplete vertical septum called the mediastinum testis. The mediastinum testis extends from the superior to near the inferior portion of the gland. It narrows in width as it travels inferiorly. Anteriorly and laterally, numerous imperfect septa are given off, which radiate to the glands surface and are attached to the tunica albuginea. These divide the interior of the testis into numerous, cone-shaped spaces that have a wide base at the gland’s surface and narrow as they converge to the mediastinum. In these spaces, the numerous lobules of glandular structures (the minute but long and highly coiled seminiferous tubules) are housed. The mediastinum supports the ducts and vessels as they pass to and from the glandular substance. The seminiferous tubules are lined with germ cells that produce sperm and nutrient fluid. These tubules empty their contents into a network of anastomosing ducts, which ultimately empties into the epididymis. he epididymis is a comma shaped, elongated structure composed of a single, fine tubular structure estimated up to 6 meters (approximately 20 feet) in length. This tube highly convoluted and tightly compressed (average size of approximately 5 cm) to the point of appearing solid. Located on the posterior border of the testis, it is composed of 3 parts, including the head (caput), body (corpora), and tail (cauda). The epididymal head overhangs the upper pole of the testis, receives the seminal fluid from the ducts of the testis (which pierce the upper portion of the mediastinum), then allows the passage of the sperm into the distal portion of the epididymis. Due to its length, the epididymal duct allows space for storage and maturation of sperm. Progressively tapering in width, the narrow tail continues as the ductus deferens Subscribe here - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCOmrniWfKi-uCD6Oh6fqhgw Watch Again : https://youtu.be/ImetvbMXgUA -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- CHECK OUT NEWEST VIDEO: "Nucleic acids - DNA and RNA structure " https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0lZRAShqft0 -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 157141 MEDSimplified
A Tour of the Cell
 
14:17
Paul Andersen takes you on a tour of the cell. He starts by explaining the difference between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. He also explains why cells are small but not infinitely small. He also explains how the organelles work together in a similar fashion. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License
Views: 2431127 Bozeman Science
Proteins
 
09:16
Paul Andersen explains the structure and importance of proteins. He describes how proteins are created from amino acids connected by dehydration synthesis. He shows the importance of chemical properties in the R-groups of individual amino acids in the polypeptide. He explains the four levels of protein folding and gives you an opportunity to fold proteins of your own using the game Foldit: Download the video game foldit here: http://fold.it/portal/ Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License
Views: 891181 Bozeman Science
Signs and Symptoms of Iron Deficiency You Should Not Ignore
 
10:04
10 Signs and Symptoms of Iron Deficiency / anemia symptoms. Iron is an important dietary mineral that is involved in various bodily functions. It is commonly known for aiding the production of hemoglobin, a protein that helps red blood cells deliver oxygen throughout your body. It also acts as a transport medium for electrons to travel within the cells and is needed for many enzymes to function normally. Here are the top 10 signs and symptoms of iron deficiency. review : 01:02 Fatigue and Tiredness 02:06 Shortness of Breath 03:12 Pale Skin 04:06 Brittle Nails 05:11 Hair Loss 06:05 Craving Nonfood Substances 1. Fatigue and Tiredness Fatigue and tiredness are common in people who have a low iron level. Iron is important for maintaining optimum levels of hemoglobin, which is the oxygen-carrying chemical in the bloodstream. Lack of oxygen in the body causes constant fatigue and tiredness. A 2000 study published in Quality of Life Research suggests that iron deficiency is associated with decreased general health and well-being and increased fatigue. If you are frequently tired and feeling fatigued, get your blood checked to find out whether you have an iron deficiency. Proper diagnosis and timely treatment will help reduce the symptoms quickly. 2. Shortness of Breath Due to a low iron level, less oxygen reaches different parts of your body. When the body’s oxygen level is low, it will cause shortness of breath, no matter how deeply you breathe. This shortness of breath occurs even while doing things that you’d normally handle just fine, such as climbing the stairs, taking a short walk or even carrying small objects. The breathlessness can be mild, moderate or severe, and breathing often returns to normal after a rest period. If you need to puff for air more often, get your iron level checked to rule out the possibility of this nutrient deficiency. 3. Pale Skin Another common sign associated with iron deficiency is pale skin or a washed-out appearance. Due to a low iron level, your body is unable to manufacture sufficient hemoglobin. It’s the hemoglobin that gives your blood its red color and your skin its rosy hue. As the iron deficiency worsens, your skin begins to lose its normal color and becomes pale. This sign is more prominent in people who have a lighter skin tone. If your skin starts looking paler than usual and you are not sick, consult a doctor to determine the cause. 4. Brittle Nails If your nails look pale, fragile and brittle, it can be a possible sign of iron deficiency. Along with brittle nails, a concave or spoon-shaped depression in the nails can indicate an insufficient iron level in the body. A low iron level hampers your body’s ability to produce enough hemoglobin, which helps carry oxygen throughout your system, including to your nails. This lack of oxygen prohibits the healthy growth of your nails. Apart from nutritional deficiencies, aging, long-term use of nail polish and frequent exposure to water can lead to brittle nails. 5. Hair Loss There are many possible causes for hair loss and iron deficiency is one of them. A low iron level sends your body into survival mode, during which it channels oxygen to support vital functions as opposed to less important functions like hair growth. In fact, women with iron deficiency are at a risk of telogen hair loss, according to a 2009 study published in Acta Dermatovenerologica Croatica. To find out whether an iron deficiency is the cause of your hair loss, it is important to measure the amount of ferritin in the blood. 6. Craving Nonfood Substances Pica is a condition in which a person has an unusual craving for non nutritive substances that can cause significant health risks. This condition can be sign of a low level of iron or other nutrients in the body. In a 2010 study published in the Journal of Medical Case Reports, experts considered pica an important sign of iron deficiency that should never be ignored. A recent 2014 study published in the Journal of Nutrition found that pregnant teens with significantly lower iron levels had cravings for ice, cornstarch, vacuum dust, baby powder, soap and other nonfood items. If you are craving nonfood items, bring it to the attention of your doctor to find out the exact reason behind it. Music: Royalty Free Music from Bensound
Views: 110807 Signs And Symptoms
What Happens To Your Body And Brain If You Don't Get Sleep
 
04:50
Sleep expert Matthew Walker breaks down the many effects of sleep deprivation on your brain and body. Tech Insider tells you all you need to know about tech: gadgets, how-to's, gaming, science, digital culture, and more. Subscribe to our channel and visit us at: http://www.businessinsider.com/sai TI on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/techinsider TI on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/tech_insider/ TI on Twitter: https://twitter.com/techinsider -------------------------------------------------- Following is the transcript of the video: Matthew Walker: My name is Matthew Walker, I am a professor of neuroscience and psychology at the University of California, Berkeley, and I am the author of the book "Why We Sleep." We certainly know that a lack of sleep will actually prevent your brain from being able to initially make new memories, so it's almost as though without sleep the memory inbox of the brain shuts down and you can't commit new experiences to memory. So those new incoming informational emails are just bounced, and you end up feeling as though you're amnesiac. You can't essentially make and create those new memories. We also know that a lack of sleep will lead to an increased development of a toxic protein in the brain that is called beta amyloid and that is associated with Alzheimer's disease because it is during deep sleep at night when a sewage system within the brain actually kicks in to high gear and it starts to wash away this toxic protein, beta amyloid. So if you're not getting enough sleep each and every night, more of that Alzheimer's-related protein will build up. The more protein that builds up, the greater your risk of going on to develop dementia in later life. What are the effects of sleep deprivation on the body? Well, there are many different effects. Firstly, we know that sleep deprivation affects the reproductive system. We know that men who are sleeping just five to six hours a night have a level of testosterone which is that of someone ten years their senior. So a lack of sleep will age you by almost a decade in terms of that aspect of virility and wellness. We also know that a lack of sleep impacts your immune system. So after just one night of four to five hours of sleep, there is a 70% reduction in critical anticancer-fighting immune cells called natural killer cells. And that's the reason that we know that short sleep duration predicts your risk for developing numerous forms of cancer. And that list currently includes cancer of the bowel, cancer of the prostate, as well as cancer of the breast. In fact, the link between a lack of sleep and cancer is now so strong that recently the World Health Organization decided to classify any form of nighttime shift work as a probable carcinogen. So in other words, jobs that may induce cancer because of a disruption of your sleep rate rhythms. We also know that a lack of sleep impacts your cardiovascular system because it is during deep sleep at night that you receive this most wonderful form of effectively blood pressure medication. Your heart rate drops, your blood pressure goes down. If you're not getting sufficient sleep, you're not getting that reboot of the cardiovascular system, so your blood pressure rises. You have, if you're getting six hours of sleep or less, a 200% increased risk of having a fatal heart attack or stroke in your lifetime. There is a global experiment that is performed on 1.6 billion people twice a year and it's called daylight saving time. And we know that in the spring, when we lose one hour of sleep, we see a subsequent 24% increase in heart attacks the following day. Another question, perhaps, is what is the recycle rate of a human being? How long can we actually last without sleep before we start to see declines in your brain function or even impairments within your body? And the answer seems to be about 16 hours of wakefulness. Once you get past 16 hours of being awake, that's when we start to see mental deterioration and physiological deterioration in the body. We know that after you've been awake for 19 or 20 hours, your mental capacity is so impaired that you would be as deficient as someone who was legally drunk behind the wheel of a car. So if you were to ask me what is the recycle rate of a human being, it does seem to be about 16 hours and we need about eight hours of sleep to repair the damage of wakefulness. Wakefulness essentially is low-level brain damage.
Views: 3073178 Tech Insider
How To Know If It's Prediabetes, Type 1 Or Type 2 Diabetes?
 
06:24
Get my prediabetes and diabetes type 2 management guide here https://goo.gl/r7WV3y Is It Prediabetes, type 1 or type2? We hear the term “diabetes” and automatically think we know what it is, right? Well, those of us with diabetes probably do know that there are 2 or maybe 3 depending how you want to classify it, types of diabetes. Some will call prediabetes a form of diabetes, and I guess that is true, kind of like pre-school is kind of like school. Then there are Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. And don’t forget about gestational diabetes. We will talk briefly about that one at the end. In this video, I will attempt to give you the similarities and differences in each as well some possible causes. Diabetes affects approximately 30 million Americans today. That is nearly 10% of the population. Diabetes is a disorder of the endocrine system. With diabetes, blood sugar levels stay high because either the pancreas can no longer produce enough insulin or the cells of the body are resistant to insulin and the pancreas can’t keep up. Either way, the glucose or sugar level in the blood stream becomes too high and the body cannot function properly. Pre-Diabetes In general, people who have a fasting plasma blood glucose in the 100-125 mg/dl range are defined as having impaired fasting glucose or pre-diabetes. Like many diseases, early detection can be very good. Talk to your doctor about testing for pre-diabetes. You may be able to prevent type 2 diabetes Type 1 Diabetes This used to be called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes. Type 1 diabetes occurs because the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas are actually destroyed by the immune system. Type 1 diabetes is actually considered an autoimmune disease. Its onset has nothing to do with diet or lifestyle. There is nothing you can do to prevent Type 1, and—at present—nothing you can do to get rid of it. Type 1 diabetes most commonly starts in people under the age of 20, but may occur at any age. According to the Mayo Clinic, the most common symptoms of Type 1 are: Increased thirst Frequent urination Bedwetting in children who previously didn't wet the bed during the night Extreme hunger Unintended weight loss Irritability and other mood changes Fatigue and weakness Blurred vision In females, a vaginal yeast infection There is no cure for Type 1 and it cannot be reversed. To determine diabetes, a blood sample will be taken after an overnight fast. A fasting blood sugar level less than 100 is normal. A fasting blood sugar level from 100 to 125 is considered prediabetes. If it's 126 or higher on two separate tests, you have diabetes. If you're diagnosed with diabetes, the doctor may do other tests to distinguish between type 1 and type 2 diabetes — since the two conditions often require different treatments. Type 2 Diabetes According to Web MD, with type 2 diabetes, the body continues to produce insulin, although insulin production by the body may significantly decrease over time. The pancreas produces either not enough insulin, or the body is unable to recognize insulin and use it properly. When there isn't enough insulin or the insulin is not used as it should be, glucose can't get into the body's cells to be used as energy. This glucose then builds up in the blood. This condition was once known adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes. More common in adults, type 2 diabetes increasingly affects children as childhood obesity increases. There's no cure for type 2 diabetes, but you may be able to manage the condition by eating well, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight. If diet and exercise aren't enough to manage your blood sugar well, you also may need diabetes medications or insulin therapy. The symptoms for Type 2 are basically the same as for Type 1 with a few additions: Slow-healing sores or cuts Itching of the skin (usually in the vaginal or groin area) Recent weight gain Numbness or tingling of the hands and feet Impotence or erectile dysfunction A quick word about gestational diabetes, Hormone changes during pregnancy can affect insulin's ability to work properly. The condition, called gestational diabetes, occurs in about 4% of all pregnancies. GB is tested for during the pregnancy and is treated if present. Usually blood sugar levels return to normal about 6 weeks after giving birth. I hope this has shed some light on the different types of diabetes.
Views: 4197 Beat Your Diabetes
Your Ears Can Indicate Your Health: Don't Ignore These 8 Factors
 
10:10
It is a normal hygienic procedure to clean our ears once every few days. However, not all of us know that ear wax can also indicate the state of our health. With the help of a Q-tip, you can check the color of your ear wax and understand what it means. TIMESTAMPS What do we know about the human ear? 0:35 Ear wax of a gray color 1:28 Ear wax with traces of blood 2:09 Ear wax of a brown color 3:02 Ear wax of a black color 3:40 Ear wax of a white color 4:25 Ear wax with an unpleasant smell 5:14 Liquid ear wax 6:03 Dry earwax 6:36 See a doctor if you have the following symptoms 7:06 What you shouldn't do to avoid any problems 8:14 Three most interesting facts about your ears 8:47 SUMMARY Ear wax is not a body waste to get rid of regularly, quite the contrary - it's a kind of protection. It keeps the ear canal lubricated, therefore, prevents the ears from itching. Moreover, it prevents different pollutants from entering the inner ear. Even more surprisingly, this substance has antibacterial properties. Our body is a clever mechanism. Did you know that when we chew, the movement pushes ear wax to the outer part of the ear? This way, your ears self-clean! If your ears tend to produce a big amount of ear wax creating a build-up, you can take some preventive measures yourself. - It's effective to use agents softening the wax. They can be mineral or baby oil, or ear drops. It is enough to put a few drops of these substances into your ear once a week to soften the ear wax and help it to come out faster and with ease. - Another way to take care of your ears is to buy a special at-home kit for their irrigation. Follow the instruction precisely step by step. Hit the like button and click subscribe to join us on the Bright Side! Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ SMART Youtube: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Have you ever seen a talking slime? Here he is – Slick Slime Sam: https://goo.gl/zarVZo ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/
Views: 10315951 BRIGHT SIDE
How To... Perform a Chi-Square Test (By Hand)
 
07:33
Also known as a "Goodness of Fit" test, use this single sample Chi-Square test to determine if there is a significant difference between Observed and Expected values. This video shows a step-by-step method for calculating Chi-square.
Views: 353387 Eugene O'Loughlin
Blood Types:  ABO and Rh (with donuts and sprinkles!)
 
15:29
All about blood types - ABO and Rh blood groups. Who donates to whom? How are blood types inherited? What are the medical issues involved with transfusions? DON'T memorize that donor / recipient table - watch this video instead! Links to videos mentioned: Mendelian Genetics: Fun with Cats and Peas http://youtu.be/xtJwHytHRfI JOIN THE FUN all over the WEB: SUBSCRIBE: http://www.youtube.com/user/ThePenguinProf FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/ThePenguinProf GOOGLE+: https://plus.google.com/+Penguinprof/posts TWITTER: https://twitter.com/penguinprof WEB: http://www.penguinprof.com/ --------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- VIDEO DETAILS: Blood Groups: ABO and Rh Blood Group Systems 32 human blood group systems are now recognized by the International Society of Blood Transfusion The most important of these: ABO blood group system and Rh blood group system Discovery of ABO Blood Types ABO blood types were discovered in 1900 by Dr. Karl Landsteiner at the University of Vienna He wondered why some patients died as a result of blood transfusions and others did not Inheritance Blood types are inherited genetic traits (like eye color, hair color, etc.) ABO Analogy: Donuts and Sprinkles donut = red blood cell A sprinkles = A antigens B sprinkles = B antigens no sprinkles = no antigens (plain donut) What are the antigens chemically? Alleles in the ABO System i = base (plain donut) IA = encodes A antigens IB = encodes B antigens Allele Combinations ii IAIA or IAi IBIB or IBi IAIB Antigens and Antibodies The antigens you have on your blood cells are recognized by your immune system as SELF antigens If foreign antigens are discovered in your body, antibodies (or immunoglobulins) will be made by B cells of the immune system Antibody Structure Antigen + Antibody = agglutination reaction Agglutination = the clumping of particles Latin: agglutinare meaning 'to glue' Mixing of all blood groups and the result KEY: CANNOT transfuse if foreign antigens are introduced!!! The Rh Antigen Inherited in Mendelian fashion! Medical issue: Rh- mother and Rh+ fetus Good News... Rho(D) Globulin Treatment ("RhoGAM")
Views: 611818 ThePenguinProf
Probability: Median: Example 1
 
09:40
In this video I go over an example on determining the median of a probability density function, which in this example is from my earlier video on Probability: Average Value: Example 2. The median is shown to be 3.5 minutes which is less than the average or mean value of 5 minutes solved previously. This is a reasonable result, which as explained in my last video on Median, the large values can skew the average more so than the median. Download the notes in my video: https://1drv.ms/b/s!As32ynv0LoaIhsAhO0k15l5pvAWuNA View Video Notes on Steemit: https://steemit.com/mathematics/@mes/probability-median-example-1 Related Videos: Probability: Median: https://youtu.be/C8ZU8BjHIqQ Probability: Average Value: Example 2: https://youtu.be/1q_yYIoQ7no Probability: Average Value: Example 2: https://youtu.be/1q_yYIoQ7no Probability: Average Value (or Mean Value): https://youtu.be/gF-zRmdTUWw Probability: Example 2: Exponentially Decreasing Probability Density Function: https://youtu.be/QeU_9NDCXoA Probability: Example 1: https://youtu.be/SDJPja8GJ1Q Probability: Introduction: https://youtu.be/H_sfVMH0VpQ Probability that my friend Dmitry Scores Goals: http://youtu.be/zbAN04Kj3D8 Three Prisoners Problem: http://youtu.be/8vY66MD7nsM Odds of Having a Perfect NCAA March Madness Bracket: http://youtu.be/It1sCq9cAFM Odds of Winning the Lottery: http://youtu.be/dVNFhu6tMQc Blood Flow: Poiseuille's Law: https://youtu.be/X6aU0p7wJzI Applications of Integrals: Hydrostatic Pressure and Force: https://youtu.be/fesMt6vmXIo Applications of Integrals: Surface Area: https://youtu.be/JkDPmAD37qk Applications of Integrals: Arc Length Function: https://youtu.be/MWKK3qLvSwU Applications of Integrals: Arc Length Proof: https://youtu.be/2rb4H_rmgxg Moments and Centers of Mass: Constant Density: https://youtu.be/3bglr1sRWUc Limits at Infinity: Horizontal Asymptotes: http://youtu.be/6pdgb09wRvI . ------------------------------------------------------ SUBSCRIBE via EMAIL: https://mes.fm/subscribe DONATE! ʕ •ᴥ•ʔ https://mes.fm/donate Like, Subscribe, Favorite, and Comment Below! Follow us on: Official Website: https://MES.fm Steemit: https://steemit.com/@mes Gab: https://gab.ai/matheasysolutions Minds: https://minds.com/matheasysolutions Twitter: https://twitter.com/MathEasySolns Facebook: https://fb.com/MathEasySolutions Google Plus: https://mes.fm/gplus LinkedIn: https://mes.fm/linkedin Pinterest: https://pinterest.com/MathEasySolns Instagram: https://instagram.com/MathEasySolutions Email me: [email protected] Try our Free Calculators: https://mes.fm/calculators BMI Calculator: https://bmicalculator.mes.fm Grade Calculator: https://gradecalculator.mes.fm Mortgage Calculator: https://mortgagecalculator.mes.fm Percentage Calculator: https://percentagecalculator.mes.fm Try our Free Online Tools: https://mes.fm/tools iPhone and Android Apps: https://mes.fm/mobile-apps
Views: 840 Math Easy Solutions
Interpretation of the Urinalysis (Part 1) - Introduction and Inspection
 
06:10
An overview of the components of a UA, along with discussion of urine color and turbidity.
Views: 143477 Strong Medicine
Excel Magic Trick 939: Use OR and AND Functions In IF Function For Logical Tests
 
16:31
Download workbook: http://people.highline.edu/mgirvin/ExcelIsFun.htm 1. IF Function: Put 1 of 2 things into a cell based on a logical test 2. AND Function: When all logical tests are passed, AND delivers a TRUE; If any one of the tests come out FALSE, AND delivers a FALSE 3. OR Function: When at least 1 logical tests is passed, OR delivers a TRUE; If any one of the tests come out TRUE, OR delivers a TRUE Examples: 1) Example 1: IF function 2) Example 2: AND function with 2 logical tests inside IF function 3) Example 3: OR function with 2 logical tests inside IF function 4) Example 4: AND function with 3 logical tests inside IF function 5) Example 5: AND and OR Functions to create a "None" Logical Test 6) Example 6: AND and OR Functions to create a complex Logical Test
Views: 406322 ExcelIsFun
The kidney and nephron | Renal system physiology | NCLEX-RN | Khan Academy
 
18:38
Overview of how the nephrons in the kidney filter blood and reabsorb water and other molecules. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-renal-system/rn-the-renal-system/v/secondary-active-transport-in-the-nephron?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/test-prep/nclex-rn/rn-renal-system/rn-the-renal-system/v/urination?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=Nclex-rn NCLEX-RN on Khan Academy: A collection of questions from content covered on the NCLEX-RN. These questions are available under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 United States License (available at http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/us/). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s NCLEX-RN channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCDx5cTeADCvKWgF9x_Qjz3g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 2151719 Khan Academy
EKG/ECG Interpretation (Basic) : Easy and Simple!
 
12:24
A VERY USEFUL book in EKG: (You are welcome!! ) http://amzn.to/2iFs135 (This includes interventions for identified arrhythmias) http://amzn.to/2icnQrg (Kindle Edition, a cheaper option) But if you feel like spending for a more comprehensive book, then here you go. (You are welcome!!) https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0912912065/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=mint0d6-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=0912912065&linkId=c575797ce4d68040ad397510d36387c4 Hello fellow nurses and nursing students! You are watching an educational video about a quick and easy method to interpret EKG/ECG. In this video, you will learn about: (1) The Conduction System of the Heart (2) The Inherent Heart Rates of the Conduction System (3) The Basic EKG Diagram and EKG Paper/Strip, and (4) The 6-Step Method for EKG Interpretation This book provides a quick but detailed information about reading EKG. You are welcome. :) https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0912912065/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=mint0d6-20&camp=1789&creative=9325&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=0912912065&linkId=c575797ce4d68040ad397510d36387c4 Subscribe to our channel to get more nursing contents: https://www.youtube.com/c/MagicinNursingTeam?sub_confirmation=1 Share this video: https://youtu.be/FThXJUFWUrw Disclaimer: The information in this video is a general compilation of different nursing books. This video is not intended to replace information you have obtained from school or your facility. Refer to your facility's policies and procedures for specific guidelines.
Views: 1112655 Magic in Nursing Team
Alere Determine™ HIV-1/2 Ag/Ab Combo US Fingerstick Test Procedure
 
11:06
Please visit http://alerehiv.com/us/ for more information
Views: 28770 alereinc
pH and pOH: Crash Course Chemistry #30
 
11:23
You can directly support Crash Course at http://www.subbable.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Also, if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing great content. In this episode, Hank goes over Reversible Reactions, the water dissociation constant, what pH and pOH actually mean, Acids, Bases, and Neutral Substances as well as the not-so-terrifying Logarithms, strong acids, weak acids, and how to calculate pH and pOH. Oh, and litmus paper! ***** AND NOW, A SUBBABLE MESSAGE! ***** "Daisy, we love you more than you love John and Hank! From Mum and Nemo." -- Table of Contents Reversible Reactions 3:40 Water Dissociation Constant 5:00 Acids, Bases, & Neutral Substances 6:38 Strong and Weak Acids 7:43 Logarithms 1:46 Calculating pH and pOH 8:45 Cool Mathematical Connections 9:54 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 1139801 CrashCourse
Blood Vessel Structure and Function
 
02:47
IB Biology, Topic 6.2: Digestion This video covers the following assessment statements-- 6.2.5 Explain the relationship between the structure and function of arteries, capillaries and veins
Views: 129 Greg Smith
Cardiac Output: Example 1
 
13:12
In this example I go over an example on determining the cardiac output, or the rate of blood that the heart pumps. This example involves using the dye dilution method for measuring cardiac output and in this case, 5 mg of dye is injected into the right atrium of the heart. The concentration of the dye is collected in the aorta in 1 second intervals until all the dye passes through. From this data we can approximate the cardiac input from the integral formula derived in my last video. We can approximate the integral of the concentration by approximating the area under the concentration graph. As explained in my earlier videos, the most accurate integral approximation method is usually the Simpson's Rule, thus that method is used in this video. Download the notes in my video: https://onedrive.live.com/redir?resid=88862EF47BCAF6CD!106298&authkey=!ALb0BKw3UmCr_Bk&ithint=file%2cpdf Related Videos: Cardiac Output: Rate of Blood Pumped by the Heart: https://youtu.be/3Z43XZLdcck Blood Flow: Poiseuille's Law: https://youtu.be/X6aU0p7wJzI Derivatives Application: Blood Flow: http://youtu.be/nTFJ57uDwtw Applications of Integrals: Hydrostatic Pressure and Force: https://youtu.be/fesMt6vmXIo Applications of Integrals: Surface Area: https://youtu.be/JkDPmAD37qk Applications of Integrals: Arc Length Function: https://youtu.be/MWKK3qLvSwU Applications of Integrals: Arc Length Proof: https://youtu.be/2rb4H_rmgxg Approximate Integration: Simpson's Rule: Proof: https://youtu.be/aDvSpOHQoLU . ------------------------------------------------------ SUBSCRIBE via EMAIL: https://mes.fm/subscribe DONATE! ʕ •ᴥ•ʔ https://mes.fm/donate Like, Subscribe, Favorite, and Comment Below! Follow us on: Official Website: https://MES.fm Steemit: https://steemit.com/@mes Gab: https://gab.ai/matheasysolutions Minds: https://minds.com/matheasysolutions Twitter: https://twitter.com/MathEasySolns Facebook: https://fb.com/MathEasySolutions Google Plus: https://mes.fm/gplus LinkedIn: https://mes.fm/linkedin Pinterest: https://pinterest.com/MathEasySolns Instagram: https://instagram.com/MathEasySolutions Email me: [email protected] Try our Free Calculators: https://mes.fm/calculators BMI Calculator: https://bmicalculator.mes.fm Grade Calculator: https://gradecalculator.mes.fm Mortgage Calculator: https://mortgagecalculator.mes.fm Percentage Calculator: https://percentagecalculator.mes.fm Try our Free Online Tools: https://mes.fm/tools iPhone and Android Apps: https://mes.fm/mobile-apps
Views: 2899 Math Easy Solutions

Best college entry essay
Visit italy essay
Paying attention to details essay writing
Accountancy career aspirations essay
All the light we cannot see analysis essay