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Transition Metals in Ionic Formulas
 
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In this video, we'll learn look at Transition Metals in Ionic Compounds. Transition metals are the elements in the middle of the periodic table, and compounds with transition metals have roman numerals in them. Transition metal elements are able to make multiple ions with different charges, so we need to use roman numeral notation (sometimes called Stock notation) to show what charge the ions have.
Views: 115145 Tyler DeWitt
Determining The Charge On A Metal Ion
 
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This video explains how to find the charge of a transition metal ion that is part of a compound.
Views: 50065 Brad Calvin
Naming Ionic Compounds with Transition Metals Introduction
 
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We'll learn how to name ionic compounds that have transition metals in them. The names for transition metal compounds often have roman numerals in them, because the roman numerals indicate the charge on the transition metal. This is because transitional metal elements are able to make a variety of ions with different charge. In order to write the roman numeral for a transition metal compound, we need to work backwards, using the periodic table or a list of polyatomic ions to figure out what charge it has in that particular ionic compound.
Views: 899986 Tyler DeWitt
Periodic Table of Elements Explained - Metals, Nonmetals, Valence Electrons, Charges
 
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This introductory chemistry video tutorial explains the periodic table of the elements and some of its trends and characteristics. This video contains a few examples, concepts, and practice problems. It's very useful for kids learning the table for the first time but unfortunately - this periodic table video contains no song. Here is a list of topics: 1. Alkali Metals - Li, Na, K, Rb - Reactivity With Water 2. Alkaline Earth Metals - Be, Ca, Mg, Sr, and Ba +2 Charge 3. Valence Electrons, Core Electrons, and Charges 4. Transition Metals - Variable Charge 5. Metals, Nonmetals, and Metalloids 6. Electrical Conductivity of Metals, Malleable & Ductile 7. Characteristics of Metalloids Such as Si and Ge 8. Chalcogens - O, S, Se - 6 Valence Electrons 9. Valence Electrons vs Core Electrons 10. Halogens - Most Reactive Nonmetals - F, Br, Cl, I 11. Noble Gases - Chemically Inert - Nonreactive - He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe 12. Inner Transition Metals - Lanthanides and Actinides 13. Representative Elements Group 1, 2, and 13-18 14. Atomic Structure - Protons, Neutrons, and Electrons 15. The Nucleus of an atom 16. Electromagnetic Force vs Strong Nuclear Force 17. Atoms vs Ions 18. Atomic Mass vs Atomic Number 19. How To Calculate The Number of Protons, Neutrons, and Electrons inside an atom or ion. 20. Elements Symbol Quiz / Worksheet Review
Writing Ionic Formulas with Transition Metals
 
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We'll learn how to write formulas for ionic compounds that contain transition metals. The transition metals are unique because they are elements are able to make multiple ions with different charges. We use roman numerals to indicate the charge of a transition metal ion. To write a formula for an ionic compound with transition metals, we make sure that the positive charge of the cation and the negative charge of the anion balance out. For background on this video, check out: Writing Ionic Formulas Introduction: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=URc75hoKGLY Transition Metals in Ionic Formulas: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Da_ah6TqAss
Views: 192572 Tyler DeWitt
How to Identify the Charge of an Ion : Chemistry Lessons
 
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Subscribe Now: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=ehoweducation Watch More: http://www.youtube.com/ehoweducation You can identify the charge of an ion by carefully paying attention to a few key traits. Find out how to identify the charge of an ion with help from an experienced chemistry professional in this free video clip. Expert: Robin Higgins Filmmaker: bjorn wilde Series Description: Chemistry plays a very important role in all of our lives each and every day. Get tips on chemistry with help from an experienced chemistry professional in this free video series.
Views: 215270 eHowEducation
Determining Ionic Charges and Valence Electrons
 
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A summary of determining ionic charges and valence electrons. View more lessons: http://www.educreations.com/yt/2649908/?ref=ytd
Views: 116298 educreations
Naming Coordination Compounds - Chemistry
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction into naming coordination compounds. It contains plenty of examples and practice problems on the nomenclature of coordination compounds. It discusses how to determine the oxidation state of the transition metal cation and how to name it when the complex ion is cation and when it's the anion. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
Finding the charge of elements from group IA to  VIIA
 
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The video describes how to find the charge of elements group number IA to VIII in the periodic table.
Views: 2120 LiveTutelage
Oxidation Numbers & States Explained - Rules, Polyatomic Ions, Compounds, & Transition Metals
 
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This chemistry video tutorial shows you how to determine the oxidation state or oxidation number of an element in a compound or a transition metal within a polyatomic ion. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems for you to work on. Here is a list of topics: 1. Assigning Oxidation Numbers To Elements in Compounds 2. Determining The Oxidation States of Transition Metals 3. Calculating The Oxidation Number of a Element in a polyatomic ion 4. Oxidation Number Rules - Pure Elements Always Zero 5. Oxidation States - Electronegativity - Fluorine is -1 6. Oxidation Rules - Oxygen Usually is -2 in Oxide and -2 in Peroxide 7. Hydrogen is +1 when bonded to a nonmetal and -1 when bonded to a metal 8. Transition Metals - Multiple Oxidation States
Finding the Ionic Charge for Elements on the Periodic Table
 
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Finding ionic charges for elements on the Periodic Table is a fundamental skill in chemistry. There are two primary methods to help you remember the charges. The first method is to consider the ionic charges for elements in their groups. As you go down a group on the Periodic Table elements tend to have the same ionic charge. For example, elements in Groups One all have a charge of +1. As is always the case with chemistry there are a number of exceptions. The second Periodic Table presented in the video shows these exceptions. Overall the trend is the same as in the first method but more detailed. This video doesn’t explain why elements have specific ionic charges but it does give you the information you need to quickly and effectively understand how to find the ionic charge of an element. --- Drawing done in Adobe Illustrator and captured with Camtasia Studio on a Microsoft Surface Pro 3. Audio recording using a Yeti Blue microphone.
Views: 212314 Wayne Breslyn
Metals and Nonmetals and Metalloids
 
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Properties of Metals, Nonmetals and Metalloids are discussed and you see where to find them on the periodic table.
Views: 113591 LHSAtkins
How To Name Ionic Compounds With Transition Metals
 
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This chemistry video tutorial focuses on naming ionic compounds with polyatomic ions, transition metals & roman numerals. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems of naming binary ionic compounds. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor
How to Memorize The Polyatomic Ions, Formulas, Charges, Naming, Chemistry
 
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This chemistry video tutorial explains how to memorize the polyatomic ions. It provides the name of the common polyatomic ions, the charges and their respective formulas as well. Common polyatomic ions include sulfate, nitrate, acetate, ammonium, hydroxide, sulfite, cyanide, phosphate, disulfide, bicarbonate, hydrogen sulfate, bisulfite, chromate, dichromate, pyrophosphate, permanganate, thiosulfate, peroxide, superoxide, oxalate, borate, iodate, perchlorate, hypochlorite, bromite, and nitrite just to name a few. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems including a quiz that tests you to see if you remember the common polyatomic ions.
Writing Ionic Formulas - Basic Introduction
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides an introduction to writing the formula of an ionic compound that contains transition metals with roman numerals and polyatomic ions. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems that you can help you with your next worksheet assignment. Here is a list of topics: 1. Writing Formulas For Ionic Compounds - Same Charged Ions 2. Monoatomic vs Polyatomic Ions List 3. Charges of Common Monoatomic Ions Based On Group Number In the Periodic Table of Elements 4. Transition Metals and Roman Numeral System List of Examples and Chemical Formulas: Sodium Chloride, Calcium Sulfide, Aluminum Nitride, Lithium Oxide, Gallium Bromide, Magnesium Phosphite, Potassium Sulfate, Strontium Phosphate, Barium Nitrate, Iron (II) Sulfide, Copper (II) Nitrite, Copper (I) Phosphite, Vanadium (V) Dichromate, and Leav (IV) Oxide.
Naming Ionic Compounds with Transition Metals Practice Problems
 
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We'll work through many practice problems where we name ionic compounds that contain transition metals using roman numerals. The names for transition metal compounds often have roman numerals in them, because the roman numerals indicate the charge on the transition metal. This is because transitional metal elements are able to make a variety of ions with different charge. In order to write the roman numeral for a transition metal compound, we need to work backwards, using the periodic table or a list of polyatomic ions to figure out what charge it has in that particular ionic compound.
Views: 406009 Tyler DeWitt
Electron Configuration - Quick Review!
 
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This chemistry video tutorial explains how to write the ground state electron configuration of an atom / element or ion using noble gas notation and how to fill the orbital diagrams. It contains examples and practice problems that include ions, transition metals, and a few exceptions. Here is a list of topics: 1. Electron Configuration of Elemental Sulfur - S 2. Atomic Number vs Mass Number 3. Number of protons and electrons in atoms and ions 4. Ground State Electron Configuration of Sulfide S-2 5. How To Determine the Number of Paired and Unpaired Electrons 6. Electron Configuration - Valence Electrons vs Core Electrons 7. How To Find the Number of S, P, and D Electrons in an element 8. Sublevels - 1s 2s 2p 3s 3p 4s 3d 4p 9. Orbital Filling Process and Orbital Energy Level Diagrams 10. Electron Configuration of Nitrogen (N) and Nitride 11. Cations vs Anions 12. Electron Configuration Using Noble Gas Notation - He, Ne, and Ar 13. Electron Configuration of Aluminum (Al) and Al+3 Cation 14. Electron Configuration of Transition Metals - Co, Co+2, and Co+3 15. Paramagnetic vs Diamagnetic Substances - Paired vs Unpaired Electrons 16. Orbital Diagrams - Up and Down Arrows 17. Aufbau Principle and Hund's Rule 18. Periodic Table - Atomic Number and Noble Gases 19. Electron Configuration Exceptions - Chromium Cr , Molybdenum Mo, Copper Cu, Silver Ag, and Gold Au.
How to Name Ionic Compounds with Transition Metals
 
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In this video we'll write the correct name for ionic compounds with transition metals ions (elements that can have varying ionic charge). Lots more practice at: https://www.breslyn.org/chemistry/naming/TM-naming-intro.php To write the name for ionic compounds with transition metals we’ll use the Periodic Table and the Common Ion Table and follow some simple rules. --- Keys for Naming Compounds with Transition Metals--- • Write the name of transition metal as it appears on the Periodic Table. • Write the name and charge for the non-metal. If you have a polyatomic ion, use the Common Ion Table to find and write the formula and charge. • Use the total charge on the non-metal (or polyatomic ion) find the charge on the transition metal. • After the name for the metal, write its charge as a Roman Numeral in parentheses. Example: Iron (III) chloride For a complete tutorial on naming and formula writing for compounds visit: http://www.breslyn.org/chemistry/naming Drawing/writing done in InkScape. Screen capture done with Camtasia Studio 4.0. Done on a Dell Dimension laptop computer with a Wacom digital tablet (Bamboo).
Views: 4345 Wayne Breslyn
Electron configuration for d block element | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Introduces rules for elements in f-block. Goes through example of Fe, and discusses relative reactivity and energy of 4s and 3d electrons. Created by Jay. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/electronic-structure-of-atoms/electron-configurations-jay-sal/v/electron-configurations-in-the-3d-orbitals?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/electronic-structure-of-atoms/electron-configurations-jay-sal/v/electron-configurations-for-the-third-and-fourth-periods?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 259907 Khan Academy
Writing Ionic Formulas: Introduction
 
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Here's how to write formulas for binary ionic compounds. We'll see how you have to balance the charges of the two ions so they cancel each other out.
Views: 1936593 Tyler DeWitt
Ions and the Periodic Table, charges on atoms
 
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Using the group on the periodic table to determine the charge on an atom
Views: 71575 Michele Berkey
How to Identify Oxidation Numbers in Coordination Compounds - Chemistry Tips
 
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How to Identify Oxidation Numbers in Coordination Compounds - Chemistry Tips. Looking for college credit for Chemistry? Enroll at http://www.straighterline.com/college-courses/general-chemistry-i.cfm Please like and comment!
Views: 72356 StraighterLine
How To Write Ionic Formulas With Polyatomic Ions
 
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This chemistry video explains the process of writing chemical formulas for ionic compounds with polyatomic ions, transition metals and roman numerals. This video contains plenty of examples and practice problems of writing formulas of binary ionic compounds. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor
Finding the Number of Valence Electrons for an Element
 
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An explanation and practice for finding the number of valence electrons for elements on the periodic table. This is a key first step for drawing Lewis dot structures for molecules.
Views: 237793 Wayne Breslyn
Oxidation state trends in periodic table | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Trends in common oxidation states for main group elements. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/oxidation-reduction/redox-oxidation-reduction/v/practice-determining-oxidation-states?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/oxidation-reduction/redox-oxidation-reduction/v/introduction-to-oxidation-and-reduction?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 229980 Khan Academy
How To Name Ionic Compounds With Roman Numerals The Easy Way!
 
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This video shows you how to name ionic compounds with roman numerals the easy way.
How to Calculate Oxidation Numbers Introduction
 
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We'll learn how to determine the oxidation numbers or oxidation states for a the elements in a chemical compound. The oxidation numbers tell us how electrons are divided up or shared between atoms in a chemical compound. The oxidation numbers also tell us how electrons move in an oxidation reduction (redox) reaction. There are a set a rules that we use to determine oxidation number. Group 1A elements (alkalai metals) always have an oxidation of +1. Group 2A elements (alkaline earth metals) always have an oxidation number of +2. Elements on their own have an oxidation number of 0, and monatomic ions have an oxidation number that is equal to the ionic charge.
Views: 1045263 Tyler DeWitt
Transition Metal Ionic Compound Names and Formulas
 
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This video illustrates how to write a chemical formula from the name for an ionic compound that contains a transition element. It also shows how to write the name from the chemical formula.
Views: 2750 Paul Dickson
Naming & formulas of Ionic compounds with Transition Metals (charges vary) & simple non-metal anions
 
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Metals in the middle of the periodic table (transition metals) can have more than one possible charge (oxidation state), so naming these ionic compounds requires a Roman Number to indicate the charge. The non-metal is still a simple anion (not a polyatomic ion).
Views: 5826 Michele Berkey
Introduction to ions | Atoms, compounds, and ions | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Difference between ions and atoms. How to calculating charge on an ion. View more lessons or practice this subject at https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/atomic-structure-and-properties/introduction-to-compounds/v/introduction-to-ions?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Khan Academy is a nonprofit organization with the mission of providing a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We offer quizzes, questions, instructional videos, and articles on a range of academic subjects, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, history, economics, finance, grammar, preschool learning, and more. We provide teachers with tools and data so they can help their students develop the skills, habits, and mindsets for success in school and beyond. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 15 million people around the globe learn on Khan Academy every month. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, we would love your help! Donate or volunteer today! Donate here: https://www.khanacademy.org/donate?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc Volunteer here: https://www.khanacademy.org/contribute?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=desc
Views: 215952 Khan Academy
Formulas Lesson 3: Transition Metals Part 1
 
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The following episode looks at Naming Ionic Compounds when the metal contains more than one charge. We look at using both the Classical system and Stock system for naming such ionic compounds. Download this episode from iTunes by typing "PapaPodcasts" in the search window.
Views: 67118 Papapodcasts
How Write the Formula for Compounds with Transition Metals
 
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In this video we'll write the correct formulas for ionic compounds with transition metals ions (elements that can have varying ionic charge). Lots more practice at: https://breslyn.org/chemistry/naming/TM-FW-intro.php To write the formula for ionic compounds with transition metals we’ll use the Periodic Table (and possibly the Common Ion Table) and follow some simple rules. --- Keys for Naming Compounds with Transition Metals--- • Write the symbol and charge for the transition metal. The charge is the Roman Numeral in parentheses. • Write the symbol and charge for the non-metal. If you have a polyatomic ion, use the Common Ion table to find the formula and charge. • See if the charges are balanced (if they are you’re done!). • Add subscripts (if necessary) so the charge for the entire compound is zero. • Use the crisscross method to check your work. Notes: • Don’t write the subscript '1'. • If you use the criss-cross method and end up with something like Ca2S2 you'll need to reduce the subscripts to Ca1S1 which we write CaS. For a complete tutorial on naming and formula writing for compounds visit: http://www.breslyn.org/chemistry/naming Drawing/writing done in InkScape. Screen capture done with Camtasia Studio 4.0. Done on a Dell Dimension laptop computer with a Wacom digital tablet (Bamboo).
Views: 442 Wayne Breslyn
4-7 Ions of Transition metals
 
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Ions of transition metals, naming and finding their charge. Worksheet: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B2_F1UEnMOLGbXBTNERwSnJoZ0U/view?usp=sharing
Valence Electrons
 
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Looking at valence electrons to figure out reactivity More free lessons at: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=1TZA171yxY4
Views: 861330 Khan Academy
How To Calculate Oxidation Numbers - Basic Introduction
 
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This chemistry video tutorial provides a basic introduction on how to calculate oxidation numbers. It discusses how to find the oxidation states of elements such as Zn, O2, F2, and P4 and how to find the oxidation numbers of polyatomic ions such as SO4 2-, PO4 3-, NO3-, ClO4-, Hg2+2, O2-2 and so forth. Examples include transition metals found in ionic compounds such as Fe3O4, V2O5, and K2CrO4. In addition, this video explains what's behind a fractional oxidation state. For instance, the oxidation number of Fe in Fe3O4 is a fraction +8/3. This tutorial relates oxidation states to electronegativity and positive and negative partial charges. Practice problems include OF2, HCl, NaH, BH3, H2S, SO2, NH3, NO2, CH4, and CO2. This video covers all of the rules relating to oxidation numbers. For instance, Hydrogen usually has a +1 oxidation state when bounded to a nonmetal but it tends to have a -1 oxidation number when attached to a metal. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
13.2.3 The existence of variable oxidation number in ions of transition metals IB Chemistry HL
 
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13.2.3 Explain the existence of variable oxidation number in ions of transition elements. d-block metals can have variable oxidation states since the d electrons are of similar energy and so can be added/removed easily (small energy change). You need to know Cr (+3, +6), Mn (+4, +7), Fe (+3) and Cu (+1). Not all make sense -- don't worry we will only ask about the ones that do!
Views: 33057 Richard Thornley
Naming Ionic and Molecular Compounds | How to Pass Chemistry
 
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Naming compounds have never been so simple! With my strategy and step by step examples, you will be naming compounds like a pro in no time! This video explains every single type of ionic compound rule and covalent compound rule you will see and there are even practice problems to lock in what you just learned. 👉 SHOP MY STEP-BY-STEP CHEMISTRY NOTES👈 https://sellfy.com/melissamaribel Thermochemistry: https://sellfy.com/p/9zWI/ Acids and Bases: https://sellfy.com/p/Ta1z/ Naming Compounds and Acids: https://sellfy.com/p/Cpof/ Dimensional Analysis, Significant Figures, and Density: https://sellfy.com/p/6AnT/ Gas Laws: https://sellfy.com/p/De81/ Stoichiometry: https://sellfy.com/p/NObu/ Redox Reactions: https://sellfy.com/p/rQsZ/ Molarity: https://sellfy.com/p/2A3h/ Limiting Reactants: https://sellfy.com/p/J2oT/ Lewis Structures: https://sellfy.com/p/HjLq/ 📗 FREE CHEMISTRY SURVIVAL GUIDE https://sellfy.com/p/NbUf/ 📙SHOP MY NOTES ON NAMING COMPOUNDS & ACIDS https://sellfy.com/p/Cpof/ 🔴 WATCH THIS VIDEO TO FIND OUT WHEN I GO LIVE https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VoLsvcsIaXM --OTHER RESOURCES TO HELP YOU GET THROUGH SCHOOL-- 🙌 This was my go-to homework help when I was in school. Chegg Study is one of my favorites. https://che.gg/melissamaribelstudy 🤓 I know from experience that finding the right tutor isn’t always easy, so here’s 30 minutes free with Chegg tutors so you can find the right tutor. https://che.gg/melissamaribeltutors 📚 I made the mistake of buying all of my textbooks, I wish I had the option of renting them. Thankfully you do, with Chegg Textbook Rentals. https://che.gg/melissamaribelrentals 💰 If you bought a textbook and don’t want the hassle of selling it, Chegg can do the work for you, with Chegg Buyback. https://che.gg/melissamaribelbuyback DISCLAIMER: Some links in the description are affiliate links, which means that if you buy from those links, I’ll receive a small commission. This helps support the channel and allows me to continue making videos like this. Thanks for the support! 💁‍♀️ HI I'M MELISSA MARIBEL I help students pass Chemistry. I used to struggle with this subject, so when I finally graduated with a bachelor's degree in Chemistry, I became a tutor so that you wouldn't have to struggle like I did. I know that with the right help, YOU CAN LEARN ANYTHING! 👋 FOLLOW ME Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hellomelissam/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hellomelissam/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hellomelissam Practice problems with step by step answers: (https://goo.gl/NwH8oC) TIMESTAMPS 1:13 Naming Strategy 1:53 Ionic Compound Naming Rules 9:49 Covalent Compound Naming Rules Example 11:49 Practice problems ___________________________________________________________________ Music: [China Electro] China-P (Morocco No Copyright music) - https://youtu.be/uDkddvltoUk Music: The Rover - S Strong https://youtu.be/DhBCxKQPHiI ___________________________________________________________________
4.1.5 State that transition elements can form more than one ion  IB Chemistry SL
 
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The reason why this is true is not needed in SL. Specifically mentioned in the syllabus is that iron ions can have a charge of 2+ or 3+. Another example is copper ions with a 1+ or 2+ charge.
Views: 18497 Richard Thornley
Naming Ionic Compounds With Variable Charged Cations - CLEAR & SIMPLE
 
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VARIABLE CHARGED IONS. I made this video to be crystal clear on how to easily name these ionic compounds. Naming Ionic Compounds with Variable Charged Ions (Variable Charged Cations). This video does an awesome job showing you how to solve these naming problems. The videos are excellent tools to aid in your understanding.
Views: 5441 sciencepost
What are Ligands?
 
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Ligands are molecules/ions (they must have a lone pair of electrons) that "bite" onto something with a high positive charge density (like a metal ion, such as Al(3+)). Check me out: http://www.chemistnate.com
Views: 119110 chemistNATE
Ionic Radius vs Atomic Radius Periodic Trend
 
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This chemistry video tutorial focuses on periodic trends such as ionic radius and atomic radius. It provides plenty of examples and explains the fundamental concepts of why some ions are smaller than atoms while others are larger. Here is a list of topics 1. Atomic Radii decreases left to right 2. Effective Nuclear Charge, Atomic Number, and Number of Protons 3. Atomic Radius Increases from top to bottom in the periodic table due to additional energy levels 4. Neutral vs Positively Charged Ion / Cation – Number of Shells or Energy Levels 5. Neutral Parent Atom vs Negatively Charged Ion / Anion – Electron Repulsion & Electron Cloud Expansion 6. General Ionic Radii Trend – Cations are smaller than Anions
Formulas & Names for Ionic compounds:  Charges must cancel to Zero
 
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Metals lose their electrons to form metal cations when non-metals steal their electrons to form non-metal anions. There are two types of metals: metals whose charge is known because it never varies (column I & II metals, and Al, Zn, & Ag) and metals whose charges vary (transition metals). The charge must be determined by the formula and the charge on the nonmetal anion, or nonmetal group of polyatomic ions.
Views: 879 Michele Berkey
13.1 Determine the oxidation state and charge on a central metal ion (HL)
 
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Please note that the charge on the metal ion is the same as the oxidation state, but it is written differently. If the oxidation state is +3, the charge on the metal ion is 3+. This video covers how to determine the charge on a complex ion and the oxidation state of the central metal ion. Link to worksheet: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3Spy779s3hPaVkyeHF5NHluLUE/view?usp=sharing
Views: 3400 Mike Sugiyama Jones
Chemistry Unit 5: Transition Metals
 
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By the end of this video, you should know that transition metal characteristics from Ti-Cu come from an incomplete d sub-level in atoms or ions, and that these characteristics include complex formations, formations of coloured ions, variable oxidation states and catalytic activity, and that these colours arise from electronic transmissions from the ground state to the excited state, including Plancks equation. On a side note, this is the link which shows the "shells": http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a8/Periodic_Table_of_Elements_showing_Electron_Shells.svg
Views: 42672 Jake Turner

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