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Dr. Becker on Cryptococcal Infection
 
05:34
http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2013/03/18/cryptococcal-infection.aspx Dr. Karen Becker, a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian, discusses a common infection in pets called cryptococcal infections.
Views: 3700 MercolaHealthyPets
HOW TO CURE FUNGUS IN YOUR CATS
 
03:59
HOW TO CURE FUNGUS IN YOUR CATS Please dont forget to subcribe https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuLmoES-tIwjxAJeuRmA1Uw
Views: 10854 SUMBER INFORMASI
Street Cat with Severely Fungal Meowing Ask for Food and Finally Getting Health
 
02:00
A poor street cat was found meowing out at side of the street asking for food with severely facial swelling. She is really suffered with this infection and has been ignored from everyone to help. It’s lucky that animal lovers met her and picked up to a vet for treatment. She has severely fungal disease or Cryptococcosis and can be spreading to the brain. She underwent long time of treatment with good medication and many contributed for her medical bills to bring her health. Finally, she’s getting full recovered and the facial swelling is gone. It’s very heart touching, we thank all kind people that involved bringing her new chance at life with truly of love. Courtesy: โชติ บก
Views: 31314 AnimalSTEP Official
Cryptococcosis
 
01:49
Views: 589 Trivian Vladmore
Feline Idiopathic Chronic Cystitis
 
10:03
http://healthypets.mercola.com/ Dr. Karen Becker, a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian discusses the symptoms of Feline Idiopathic Chronic Cystitis and what to do if your cat experiences it.
Views: 18200 Mercola
Feline Ischemic Encephalopathy in Cats
 
02:08
Concerned that your cat may have Ischemic Encephalophathy? Here are some signs and symptoms to watch out for: neurological signs like seizures, circling movements, alter behavior like unexplained aggression, and blindness. Feline ischemic encephalopathy (FIE) is caused by the presence of a parasite, the Cuterebra larva, in a cat's brain.
Views: 428 petMD
Nasopharyngeal polyp removal in a cat
 
02:39
Dr Magnifico a small animal veterinarian removes a polyp from the back part of a cats mouth (nasopharyngeal polyp). What does a polyp look like? How is it diagnosed and how to remove one, along with the cost. For more information on these ask for free at Pawbly.com
Views: 1760 Krista Magnifico
Nasal Discharge in Cats (2018)
 
04:04
Discussion of nasal discharges in cats.
Views: 79 Rod Allrich
Seefah suffers cryptococcosis.
 
00:49
ผ่าน YouTube capture
Views: 122 SaveThaiStrayS
🔶 SPOROTRICHOSIS - You and your pet can get it (with captions)
 
03:21
References and suggestions: https://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.1005638 - Sporothrix Species Causing Outbreaks in Animals and Humans Driven by Animal–Animal Transmission (Rodrigues et al., 2016) https://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.1006077 - Zoonotic Epidemic of Sporotrichosis: Cat to Human Transmission (Gremião et al., 2017) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3194828/ - Sporothrix schenckii and Sporotrichosis (Barros et al., 2011) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4295339/ - Sporotrichosis: An Overview and Therapeutic Options (Mahajan, 2014) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5674690/ - Sporotrichosis: an update on epidemiology, etiopathogenesis, laboratory and clinical therapeutics (Orofino-Costa et al., 2017) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22682194 - Sporotrichosis (Vásquez-del-Mercado et al., 2012) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25526781 - Global epidemiology of sporotrichosis (Chakrabarti et al., 2015) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30009528 - Sporotrichosis in Southern Brazil, towards an epidemic? (Poester et al., 2018) https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/sporotrichosis/index.html - CDC, Fungal diseases, Sporotrichosis https://www.gaffi.org/wp-content/uploads/Sporotrichosis-GAFFI-Fact-sheet-v4-.pdf - Global Action Fund for Fungal Infections, Felix Bongomin, 2018 http://agencia.fapesp.br/sporotrichosis-an-emerging-disease-that-affects-cats-can-be-transmitted-to-humans/25049/ - Sporotrichosis, an emerging disease that affects cats, can be transmitted to humans (Agência FAPESP, Peter Moon, 2017) https://youtu.be/qC655Dr7J5I - Sporotrichosis by Prof Alexandro Bonifaz, Hospital General de Mexico (Leading International Fungal Education) Welcome. This project has the ultimate goal of helping you prevent some common diseases and maintain a healthy life. This channel’s videos also attempt to debunk some myths and spread science-based knowledge. References are displayed in the slides, so that viewers can read full texts. But no reference or video is presented just to be swallowed with bigotry. Perhaps one of the mainstays of science and reason is doubt; therefore, viewers are not expected to accept and agree with every evidence, article, or statement. The comments section is enabled, so you’re free to share your ideas and critiques. It is also good to bear in mind that the research which built the basis for these videos was limited - thus, might have ignored important information - and that science is ever-changing. As new articles are published daily, part of this content may become obsolete or incorrect. Moreover, even recent articles could have wrong conclusions, and flaws regarding methodology and data analysis. Hence, it is always better to consider many studies than to attach too much weight to just one conclusion. Epidemiological studies also have other problems: they don’t distinguish so well between causality and mere correlation, and their results cannot be perfectly extrapolated to people that did not take part in them. Differences among persons (behavioral, environmental, genetic) generate confounding variables that are sometimes ignored. Professionals and specialists can help in solving doubts and in adapting generalizations to a specific individual. If you wish to help translating this video, you can select the gear icon in the player, Subtitles/CC, Add subtitles or CC (https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/6054623). Otherwise, you can use this link: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_video?ref=share&v=17K2ApGDHBI
Views: 44 Pyrro of Elis
Removing a Tumor Under the Skin: Mast Cell Tumor Cat
 
05:19
Sylvester was diagnosed with a mast cell tumor from under the skin on his legs. Fortunately, the tumor which can spread in dogs, is relatively benign in cats.
Views: 13820 Greg Martinez DVM
Communicating Risk (Cryptococcosis)
 
02:04
Group 3 WHS Assignment 2016
Ignored Adult cat Was found by Hearted Man, And he has a better life Now
 
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Ignored Adult cat Was found by Hearted Man, And he has a better life Now. Skimble stray six years cat who was begging food from people and many people ignored him- except one man, the man brought him to local vet . Skimble reached out to the rescue organization called Milo’s Sanctuary. and they agreed to take care of him. Michelle from Milo’s Sanctuary said Skimble was diagnosed with Cryptococcus, which is a severe fungal infection and it can several years before Skimble is free from the infection. The test result was negative, but it still could be in his system. he looks great after months of treatment and he is happy now, Skimble is now part of Milo’s Lifetime Care Program. and he will never live her life in the streets again. #cat #cats #cat_video ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For Any Copyright Issues Please Contact Us : [email protected] ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mypetssite/ Twitter : https://twitter.com/mypetssite Pintrest: https://www.pinterest.com/mypetssite Tumblr : https://mypetssite.tumblr.com/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- You can download our application for pets wallpaper : https://goo.gl/S24sus ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.mypets.pet/ ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 1434 My Pets
Dr. Karen Becker Discusses Megacolon
 
06:36
http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2012/11/26/megacolon.aspx Dr. Karen Becker, a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian discusses megacolon.
Views: 14077 MercolaHealthyPets
Cat falling over, losing balance (new video) (neurologic disease)
 
01:27
This is recent video (March 2014) of my 5-year old cat losing his balance from undiagnosed neurologic disease. The videos referenced below are from late 2013, so you can see the progression of the disease. His balance is getting worse and worse, but he doesn't seem to be in pain, his appetite is normal, and he still likes to play. And as you can see, he gets up and keeps going each time he falls. He's a fighter! *********** My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see other video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in THIS VIDEO at 18 seconds); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. Here is a seizure caught on video (but it's slightly blurry: http://youtu.be/wpV-FchJxeA). There is also a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q); • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures. (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 48826 Susie Lorden
Cat Asthma Attack -- what to look for in your kitty
 
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Poor Casper. After rescuing this big boy from the outdoors (his previous owner's abandoned him), we found him doing this strange cough. It didn't look like a hairball cough and happened often enough that it concerned us. So we took this video to show our vet. And sure enough, this is the telltale sign of kitty asthma. They also took X-rays to verify. This is what a feline asthma attack looks and sounds like. During an asthma attack, a cat will put his head down near the ground and stretch his neck out (like a seal). This is not a hairball cough. Feline asthma affects approximately 1% of the american domestic feline population. Casper is now taking a steroid, Prednisolone, daily which has helped to decrease the frequency of his attacks. If you see your cat doing this, take him to the vet for a check-up.
Views: 488624 MeowValet
Dr. Becker Discusses Canine Leptospirosis
 
07:32
http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2013/02/25/canine-leptospirosis.aspx Dr. Karen Becker, a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian, discusses canine leptospirosis, which is found in most domesticated and wild animals.
Views: 27808 MercolaHealthyPets
#2 Cat losing balance, falling over, head bobbing (degenerative neurologic disease)
 
00:40
My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see other video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk, and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in THIS VIDEO at 18 seconds); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. Here is a seizure caught on video (but it's slightly blurry: http://youtu.be/wpV-FchJxeA). There is also a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q); • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures. (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 61135 Susie Lorden
Sporotrichosis Top # 8 Facts
 
01:05
Sporotrichosis Top # 8 Facts
Views: 1785 Ganesha Jignesh
Ларингеальная лимфома у кошки(laryngeal lymphoma in cat)
 
00:57
Кот породы русская-голубая,самец,7лет. Были направлены к нам на диагностику из другой клиники.Жалобы на резкую пропажу голоса в течение недели.Дыхание со свистом.Когда спит-хрипит. По аускультации на приеме-шумное дыхание в области гортани.При малейшем стрессе сразу синеет. На ларингоскопии обнаружено образование,из которого был взят материал для проведения цитологического и гистологического исследований. По предварительному цитологическому исследованию-Мелкоклеточная лимфома.Гистология в процессе изготовления.
Views: 172 Irina Katsuk
#4 Cat, head dropping (degenerative neurologic disease)
 
00:10
This video shows my 5-yr old cat's head dropping down to the ground after he's been looking up. (It's one of many symptoms of his degenerative neurologic disease). My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see other videos at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA.); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in this video at 18 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. Here is a seizure caught on video (but it's slightly blurry: http://youtu.be/wpV-FchJxeA). There is also a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q); • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures. (THIS VIDEO) and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 1692 Susie Lorden
Feline Nose Scope
 
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Mass on ventral surface of rt nostril. Extremely noisy and raspy breathing. Cat also has large mass in abdomen.
Views: 830 Kenneth Jones DVM
Veterinary Endoscopy: Nasal carcinoma in cat.
 
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Exhibition and retrograde biopsy of nasal carcinoma in cat using flexib\ le endoscope. www.ayoraendoscopiaveterinaria.es
#5 Cat muscle spasm (degenerative neurologic disease)
 
00:30
This video shows my 5-year old cat with degenerative neurologic disease twitching when he lays down (at .3, .8, .18, .21, and .27 seconds in this video - though it's kind of hard to see in this video). My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see videos at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in this video at 18 seconds: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA&feature=youtu.be); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. Here is a seizure caught on video (but it's slightly blurry: http://youtu.be/wpV-FchJxeA). There is also a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q); • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see THIS VIDEO at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 42114 Susie Lorden
Fungus in the Lungs | Monsters Inside Me
 
01:54
Subscribe to Animal Planet! | http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=animalplanettv A school girl cannot understand why she's finding it so hard to breathe, until the is revealed that there is a fungus spreading throughout her lungs. | For more Monsters Inside Me, visit http://animal.discovery.com/tv/monsters-inside-me/#mkcpgn=ytapl1
Views: 54781 Animal Planet
Dr. Becker Talks About Pyothorax
 
05:31
http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2013/03/04/pyothorax-infection.aspx Dr. Karen Becker, a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian, talks about pyothorax, an infection in the chest cavity.
Views: 6489 MercolaHealthyPets
Biopsy Rules Out Lymphocutaneous Sporotrichosis for Micobacterium Marinum
 
07:21
Patient-filmed biopsy procedure of lymph nodule to rule-out or confirm diagnosis of Sporotrichosis. Symptoms appeared from wound under thumb nail, possibly a splinter, sliver, or cat claw, spreading mysteriously through lymphatic system on inner arm, to above elbow. However, gardening or working in soil had not been a regularly-practiced activity. Without early diagnosis and treatment, symptoms by approximately 6-8 weeks rapidly exacerbated within the last few days, though there had been a period of 12 days with antibiotics. It was very fortunate that a quality teaching hospital was sought for diagnosis and treatment, as more than 25 residents/doctors were involved in consults. Incidence is extremely rare, affecting only 1 to 2 individuals per million. Eventually, the culture was determined to be Micobacterium Marinum, an even rarer infection, estimated to affect less than 1 in 100,000 (A.ubry, Chosidow, Caumes, et al, 2002). It was assumed that I was exposed when a sliver of driftwood got under my thumb as I was pulling it from my aquarium. The driftwood was purchased at a (questionable & dirty) aquarium shop. See: http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/228723-overview
Views: 2981 PawPrint Press
Sporotrichosis: Most Important Points
 
10:27
Sporotrichosis is an infection caused by a fungus known as Sporothrix schenckii. Outbreaks of sporotrichosis have been documented in the United States, . These videos are the medical lectures given by Paul Kattupalli MD for educating health care professionals and people seeking medical information. Sporotrichosis Top # 8 Facts. ◅ Sporotrichosis treatment — Finding the right information about Sporotrichosis treatment & symptoms, is crucial to managing Sporotrichosis .
Views: 514 Hollis Lizzette
Sporotrichosis all thru my membranes
 
01:02
Painful, hideous from rise thorns
Views: 1984 jeanne johnson
#1 Cat falling over, losing balance (degenerative neurologic disease)
 
00:25
My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see other videos at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk, and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in this video at 18 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. Here is a seizure caught on video (but it's slightly blurry: http://youtu.be/wpV-FchJxeA). There is also a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q); • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 3847 Susie Lorden
Tilly the Cat - Update 1
 
00:11
Update - Tilly has had her first day of meds and we are now on day two. She seems much more like herself and is back to purring almost constantly. ---The Diagnosis Tilly has had a bump on her forehead for about two months now. At first I thought she had just ran into something hard enough when she got one of her random "zoomies" but when it didn't go down after a week had passed we took her into the vet. The vet we took her too at first suspected that it was a small cyst that had formed when she had run into something and he said it would heal gradually on it's own. Another month and a half passed by though and instead of getting any smaller the bump grew larger and was also clearly starting to cause her discomfort. We took her to another vet for a second opinion and she has been diagnossed with Cryptococcus Neoformans (C.N.) which is a type of fungul infection that causes a severe form of meningitis. C.N. is treatable but without medicine it will eventually kill her. Tilly needs Itraconazole, one capsule mixed with her food every day for 3 to 12 months. Each bottle will last one month and each month will cost 258 dollars. She will also need monthly checkups at the vet which could range from 60 to 125 dollars per visit. On my own I know I can not afford this but I do not want to give up on her and either watch her slowly die or be forced to make the choice to stop her suffering. I have estimated the cost at being around 4000 dollars total. It is not an amount I have to pay all at once but every little bit will help ensure she gets the medicine and care that she needs to hopefully make a full recovery. ---Background on Tilly Tilly showed up on our porch a little over a year ago just before a huge storm was about to hit. My roommates and I brought her in and looked after her, trying to see if she had an owner or if we could find her a new home. Tilly and I quickly grew attached though and when no one else claimed her she became a part of the family. Tilly is the cuddliest little thing and loves to sit on my lap or next to me. She will headbut my hands or my elbows when she wants to be pet (which is basically all the time). She purrs loudly and nearly constantly with a little trill that comes out when she is extremely happy. She has been so affectionate and I can not believe it's only been a year because it feels like she has been in my life for so much longer. As I write this she is laying next to me on the couch, purring loudly like always. I do not have the words to express how much this darling little kitty means to me but I would be eternally greatful to have a few more years or even just to have the chance at helping her get better. Thank you for taking the time to read this.
Views: 6 Wantz2Fly
Cat having seizure (neurologic disease)
 
01:19
Here is video of my 5-year old cat, Churro, having a seizure (or muscle spasm?). See his legs sticking straight out, trembling from his muscles tensed rock solid, his head strained backwards. The episode lasted until he's placed down on the floor. These episodes have been getting steadily worse over the last year or so, as his neurologic disease progresses. Sorry the video starts out blurry! *********** My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see videos at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in THIS VIDEO at 18 seconds); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. This is in this video, and also there is a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q), but I haven't caught the full-body seizure on video; • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures. (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 23995 Susie Lorden
Why Is Your Cat’s Mouth Health So Important?
 
01:47
If untreated, the bacteria in your cat’s mouth can leader to bigger problems causing your cat discomfort or worse. Feline specialist, Dr. Elizabeth Ruelle explains how to keep your cat’s mouth healthy and how to tell if an unhealthy mouth has caused further problems. For more information, please visit http://cathealthy.ca
Views: 397 Cat Healthy
#3 Cat losing balance, wobbles (degenerative neurologic disease)
 
00:15
My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see other videos at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA.); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in this video at 18 seconds: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA&feature=youtu.be); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in THIS VIDEO; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. Here is a seizure caught on video (but it's slightly blurry: http://youtu.be/wpV-FchJxeA). There is also a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q); • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 2386 Susie Lorden
UPDATE VIDEO for Mr. Sniffles!
 
02:29
Meet, Mr. Sniffles, who was discovered in a feral colony in North Hollywood. The area is a congested, industrial neighborhood... lined with busy garages and warehouses that manufacture tile, paint products and automotive parts. God knows where these poor creatures hide during the day or find shelter from the elements. There's not much "green space". Instead, their environment consists of broken glass, toxic chemicals, wooden pallets, debris, dumpsters, and large, commercial vehicles and trucks. My friend, Jade Katona, has been feeding at this location for a couple of years and I've often accompanied her so I could trap the ones that needed to be spayed/neutered or required medical attention. Mr. Sniffles started coming out to eat from behind a gated alley and we immediately knew something wasn't right. He appeared to have a lump on his head, between his eyes, which was beginning to distort his features. We could also hear his labored breathing. I knew we needed to get him examined by a vet and made a plan to trap him. He was first taken to FixNation where he was neutered, vaccinated, and given a topical flea medication. The veterinary staff examined him (standard protocol for the clinic). Their basic diagnosis was that he had some kind of mass in his nasal cavity, which was beginning to cause facial deformity and restricting the air flow through his nose. Since this particular clinic focuses, mainly, on sterilizing community cats, it was recommended I take him to another veterinary practice for further assessment. Many, within the rescue community, began weighing in and some recommended, since he's a "feral" - that he be humanely euthanized. As you can see, by the video, he "was" a feral cat... in the beginning. But since he's been in captivity and been handled often for exams, he's not only become tame... but an extremely affectionate and social fella who LOVES to get scruffs around his head, face and neck! He's also become quite chatty. Mr. Sniffles also has a constant, nasal drip (hence his name!) and when he sneezes or shakes his head, green mucous flies through the air, splattering on the walls and floors, covering everything in his surroundings. I quickly realized his food bowl needed to be shallow because the kibble beneath would get saturated within a day or two, and go to waste. His food/water dishes and entire enclosure must be cleaned regularly... and most items need a good soaking in hot, soapy water. Does it gross me out? No. Does he have a funky smell? Yes. But all you have to do is meet Mr. Sniffles and experience him looking directly in to your eyes - as if he's saying, "I want to LIVE!" - and you'll feel how strong of a life force he possesses! And he's still enjoying the simple things in life... like his nightly bowl of wet food, getting brushed, hangin' out in his hammock or just being in the company of us human types. Typically, cats will lose their appetite if they can't smell. Although his nostrils are extremely constricted, he's still able to breathe through his nose. We're worried he may go downhill if his nose becomes completely blocked. Back to the medical stuff... We have since taken him to three, different veterinarians for further assessment and lab work. The first test conducted was for Cryptococcus (a fungal infection spread by bird droppings) and the results were negative. He's also had a full blood panel run... ruling out FIV/FeLV and other illnesses. According to Dr. Sunada (North Hollywood Animal Care Center), some of his protein(?) levels were elevated which could be consistent with what we may find in an animal fighting cancer. But she also noted that we cannot possibly diagnose him without conducting a biopsy and a MRI. Unfortunately, the growth is behind solid bone and there's no way to get a needle in to the target area. Dr. Sunada recommends he be taken to a specialist for facial surgery... in order for a biopsy to be done. After phoning multiple clinics, researching the costs of such a procedure, we realized it is just beyond our financial means. This is why we NEED YOUR HELP!!! Please... won't you help us help Mr. Sniffles?!! Time is of the essence because his condition is only worsening with time. You can find additional photos and updates on Mr. Sniffles on our Face book page: "Save The Leadwell Kitties". Just search the albums and he's in the one entitled, "Rhae's Rescue Cats #11 of 13". And we thank you, so deeply, from the bottom of our hearts. *Please be sure to follow the latest update on Mr. Sniffles on his GoFundMe campaign at gofundme.com/helpmr-sniffles. Thanks!
Views: 96 Rhae 2TheResQ
Checkups: Brain infected by fungus
 
00:44
Dr. Simona Ferioli of UC's Neuroscience Institute shows and talks about the brain scan of a patient whose brain was infected by mold after using heroin. (Mark Bowen for WCPO) ◂ WCPO - 9 On Your Side brings you the latest trusted news and information for the greater Cincinnati Tri-State area, including Northern Kentucky and Indiana. WCPO Channel 9 News brings you breaking news alerts, weather, traffic, streaming video and in-depth coverage of topics important to you and your community. For more download the WCPO mobile app: iPhone: http://bit.ly/iOS-wcpo Android: http://bit.ly/wcpo-android
EXCITING NEWS (and Thanksgiving Special!) - Cat Lady Fitness / True Health Trifecta
 
05:44
THANKSGIVING SPECIALS!! Get 30% off ALL apparel and accessories in the CatLadyFitness.com/shop – just enter PURRKEY17 code at checkout 😊 For 50% my e-book versions of The Grocery Store Tour Guide & Nutritional Workbook, and The Plant-Based Protein Bar Recipe book, go to TrueHealthTrifecta.com/guides-books and click on “Buy the E-Book” buttons – the discount will be applied automatically! For my Holistic Fitness Jumpstart Program $7 sale, also go to TrueHealthTrifecta.com/guides-books and click on the icon for the program – the discount for this will be applied automatically at checkout! **All of the above specials are only available until 11:59PM EST on Monday, November 27!** Unfortunately, my best-selling Holistic Fitness Starter Guide and Workbook into Wellness are only available in their printed versions right now, but you can find those at Amazon.com or any major bookstore online 😊 Get your FREE STRESS RELIEF GUIDE to prepare for the 30 Day Video Series here: https://www.truehealthtrifecta.com/eft Thank you so much for supporting me and my channel and have a wonderful holiday weekend! Get my HOLISTIC FITNESS JUMPSTART PROGRAM here: https://www.truehealthtrifecta.com/7-day-jumpstart/ Click the thumbs up if you found this video helpful or interesting and SUBSCRIBE for new videos every week including cat video Caturdays, Tapping Tuesdays, and whatever other random things I feel like posting 😊 Thanks for watching! ◘→ Helpful links ←◘ Vitamix (because everyone always asks!): http://amzn.to/2zGvrKB How to make Raw Cat Food: https://www.catladyfitness.com/my-diet Holistic Fitness Starter Guide & Grocery Store Tour Guide: http://bit.ly/2nr00vx ◘→ Playlists ←◘ ⭐ STRESS MANAGEMENT & EFT: http://bit.ly/2EChIDf 😺 CAT STUFF: http://bit.ly/2vmwAE8 🍎 FOOD & RECIPES: http://bit.ly/2nsPXFA 💪 WORKOUTS & EXERCISES: http://bit.ly/2nn9yaH 🔨 DIY & HACKS: http://bit.ly/2DYNo8m 👄 SELF-CARE & BEAUTY: http://bit.ly/2E3shSA ◘→ Additional resources ←◘ ⭐ FREE Stress Relief EFT Guide: https://www.truehealthtrifecta.com/eft/ 💪 Holistic Fitness Jumpstart Program: http://bit.ly/2GvSU0F 😺 Raw Cat Food Common Questions & Answers: http://bit.ly/2no3NJZ 😺 Go-To Source for Cat Nutrition: http://www.feline-nutrition.org ◘→ Social Media & Websites ←◘ Instagram: Jazamina Twitter: Jazamina Facebook: Cat Lady Fitness 💪 TrueHealthTrifecta.com 😺 CatLadyFitness.com 💚→ Support this channel ←💚 My Guides & Books: https://www.truehealthtrifecta.com/guides-books Apparel & Accessories for Cat People: https://www.catladyfitness.com/shop Donation link: http://paypal.me/truehealthtrifecta Non-monetary support options (at bottom of page): http://bit.ly/2no3NJZ ◘→ Discount links ←◘ BasePaws.com ($15 off EACH CatKit DNA test) enter promo code CATLADYFITNESS in cart at checkout! Plant-based Vegan Protein by VivoLife (10% off your order): http://vivolifeusa.refr.cc/jasmin TrustedHousesitters.com (20% off your membership): http://bit.ly/2EnVLrP Turo App (get $25 off your first car rental trip): https://turo.com/c/jasminb27 AirBnB (get $40 travel credit for signing up): http://www.airbnb.com/c/jasminb680 Rocket Language Spanish Course ($50 to $200 off programs): http://bit.ly/2BGv2DN ◘→ Disclaimer & Liability Release ←◘ For cat stuff: As I mention in many videos, I am not a licensed veterinarian or vet tech. I am a cat owner, lover, and independent researcher in regard to the cat nutrition, care, and information I share on this channel and on CatLadyfitness.com. If you are seeking proper medical advice for your furry babies, always consult with your personal veterinarian first :) For EFT (tapping) and all other health-based content: By watching these videos and practicing this technique, you agree to take full responsibility for your physical health and emotional well-being, as well as release any liability from the Cat Lady Fitness YouTube channel and True Health Trifecta Holistic Fitness. ◘→ Business email ←◘ Check the About tab of this channel. #catladyfitness #rawcatfood #bestcatchannel
Views: 190 Cat Lady Fitness
Feline focal seizure Post-ictal phase
 
00:41
FELINE FOCAL SEIZURE: A focal seizure refers to an abnormal surge of electrical activity that is confined to a specific area of the brain. Unlike a generalized seizure, in which the animal’s entire brain is affected and therefore the entire body shows signs of a seizure, a focal seizure only affects a localized region of the brain and therefore only has limited effects on the body. These affects may vary significantly, depending on which portion of the brain is affected. POST-ICTAL PHASE: During the post-ictal phase, there is confusion, disorientation, salivation, pacing, restlessness and/or temporary blindness. This video shows our cat who spent an entire day dazed & confused, refusing to sleep. She is obviously exhausted here, but won't allow herself to fall asleep. OUR CAT, LUCREZIA, THE DETAILS: Lucrezia is our 3 year old female cat who had what we now believe to be a FOCAL SEIZURE in the early hours of the morning on 12/30/18. Total post-ictal phase lasted until evening of 12/31/18. At first we didn't know what was wrong with her, she was just acting strange. She was VERY vocal & wouldn't stop meowing and yowling. She took off running like a nut, so I thought she just needed to play a bit and let off some steam. I played with her & during this time I noticed something was up with one or both of her hind legs. She was running around the corner & sliding a bit. We noticed she was having a hard time climbing her cat tree, like her legs were weak. She even fell off her cat tree from the top to 2nd tier where she caught herself. She seemed disoriented. Confused. She was walking a little weird. And, finally, my husband and I decided to take her into the ER around 6am. The vet examined her & said she appeared fine, & she couldn't see the strange behavior or hind leg weakness. So, we decided on blood pressure, Bloodwork & urinalysis to see if there were any issues with her kidneys, white blood cells, etc. And, they sent us home. That's when things got worse. We decided to take video of her strange behavior, so we'd have evidence this time when we met with the Neurologist. I'll upload the video of her trying to sit and SWAYING wildly back & forth. She lost her balance every time she tried to groom herself. She walked to places, walked away, walked right back - totally confused & disoriented. She DEVOURED her food, like she was eating out of anxiety. Food flying everywhere. Same with her water, she was drinking like crazy. Around 5pm, we called the vet back & made an appt with the Neurologist on 12/31/18. We saw the Neurologist at 10am, & she'd been able to get the results of her urinalysis & bloodwork (all of which came back totally fine). She took her in the back to watch her walk, how she reacted, etc. Of course, Lucrezia was terrified & appeared normal. However, that's when we busted out the video footage - we had evidence this time After watching this video & several others that I'll also post, the neurologist explained that she thought she was in the post-ictal phase of a seizure. Most likely a Focal seizure, since we hadn't noticed any body seizures. She just didn't know WHY she was having them. Next step, to find out if what's causing her seizures is external like a virus, fungus, or deficiency. So, we did additional testing for FIP, FeLv, Cryptococcus, Toxoplasmosis, & a protein test to treat her liver function. By the way, all of these came back negative & she appears otherwise healthy. Although, she did test positive in "the low end" for the Coronavirus, but negative for it on "the high end." Apparently, 90% of indoor cats are positive for antibodies for Coronavirus that can lead to FIP (Feline infectious peritonitis), a fatal mutation that typically kills kittens & elderly cats. Most cats are exposed to this virus & they really don't know what causes it to mutate in some cats & kill them. I have to say this totally freaked me out, even though I was assured that it wasn't an issue since she was otherwise very healthy. So, what now? She has something wrong internally, INSIDE her brain. It could be many things, so just steps it's an MRI (which she'd need anesthesia for) and a spinal tap. During her physical, the vet also noted she had a "3 out 6" Heart Murmur. I guess that means it's not bad, but I want to make sure there's nothing else going on there before they put her under anesthesia. If she has an underlying heart condition, anesthesia could kill her. They do it differently with cats that have a heart condition, so we'll need to do an EKG first. Since Lucrezia was 100% back to her nornal self by three afternoon on 12/31/18, we've decided to hold off on the MRI for right now. I'm going to see how she does the next couple of weeks & then most likely schedule it, one she gets cleared after the EKG. Anyways, I'll post these videos & any updates, as needed. I want to share this with my fellow pet parents, since YouTube was one of the first places I went to for help.
Views: 31 C Con
Cutaneous and Subcutaneous Mycosis (Intro)
 
01:17
Sqadia video is the demonstration of Cutaneous and Subcutaneous Mycosis. Mycosis in humans and domestic animals, is a disease caused by any fungus that invades the tissues, causing superficial, subcutaneous, or systemic disease. Some of these fungi can cause infection when they gain entry through a wound; others mainly cause opportunistic infections in immunocompromised patients. There are four types of human fungal disease according to depth and extent of infection: Superficial mycoses, cutaneous mycoses, subcutaneous mycoses, and systemic or deep mycoses. The clinical nomenclatures used for the mycoses are based on the Site of the infection, Route of acquisition of the pathogen, and Type of virulence exhibited by the fungus. The primary pathogens have relatively well-defined geographic ranges; the opportunistic fungi are ubiquitous. Mycoses range in extent from superficial infections involving the outer layer of the stratum corneum of the skin to disseminated infection involving the brain, heart, lungs, liver, spleen, and kidneys. Many of the deeply invasive mycoses are difficult to diagnose early and often difficult to treat effectively. Source of fungi is endogenous or exogenous. Endogenous human is candida specie and Pneumocystis Jirovecii. Ubiquitous Environmental is Aspergillus and Zygomycetes. Regional Endemic Mycoses includes Histoplasma, Coccidioides, and Blastomyces. Widespread Endemic Mycoses are Cryptococcus and Sporothrix. Stream the COMPLETE lecture on sqadia.com https://www.sqadia.com/programs/cutaneous-and-subcutaneous-mycosis
Views: 298 sqadia.com
Rhinoscopy in a cat , ventral nasal cavity
 
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СD диск - Введение в эндоскопию кошек и собак Обложка: Black box (твёрдая), в цвете Качество печати обложки и диска: лазерное Общая продолжительность: 1 час 45 мин Состоит из: 20 видеоклипов (эндоскопия пищевода и желудка кошек и собак (6 клипов),эндоскопия толстой кишки кошки и собаки (2 клипа), лапароскопии кошки и собаки (5 клипов), торакоскопии кошки и собаки (3 клипа), вагиноскопия собаки, цистоуретроскопия собаки, отоскопия собаки, артроскопия собаки) Клипы оригинально смонтированы для адекватного восприятия внешней и внутренней работы врача. Все клипы полностью озвучены по ходу работы с описанием нормы и найденных изменений. Стоимость: 1 т.р. включая доставку Приобрести диски можно сделав заявку по т\факс 8(3522) 254152, 8(3522) 254064, E-mail: [email protected] Форма оплаты любая. Контактное лицо -- Костюкова Екатерина Михайловна, Мурзина Наталья Павловна Подробная информация на www.endovet.su (раздел "Эндовет продакшн"). Необходимые вещи для специалистов http://endovet.su/magazin/
Views: 343 Alexandr Chernov
Protozoa: CNS
 
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3. Protozoa 3 CNS This video is part of a comprehensive medical school microbiology, immunology & infectious diseases course. Your comments on videos will be key as we iterate content. If you are interested in implementing all or part of this course, we are happy to share and would only ask for your candid evaluation in return: https://stanfordmedicine.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_8i98rRk2XRCXQ45 If you are interested in collaborating with us, please contact: [email protected] This course was created collaboratively between Stanford, UW, Duke, UCSF, and University of Michigan and made possible by support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
Glowing Cells Help Fight Fungal Lung Infections | Video
 
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Fungal lung infections like those caused by Histoplasma capsulatum are difficult to treat because it's hard to get rid of the fungal cells without damaging human cells. A new way to mark fungal cells by making them glow could solve that problem.
Views: 1702 LiveScience
Sporotrichosis can grow in tissue
 
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I felt like a living rose bush, I had thorns growing all thru my body.
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