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Street Cat with Severely Fungal Meowing Ask for Food and Finally Getting Health
 
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A poor street cat was found meowing out at side of the street asking for food with severely facial swelling. She is really suffered with this infection and has been ignored from everyone to help. It’s lucky that animal lovers met her and picked up to a vet for treatment. She has severely fungal disease or Cryptococcosis and can be spreading to the brain. She underwent long time of treatment with good medication and many contributed for her medical bills to bring her health. Finally, she’s getting full recovered and the facial swelling is gone. It’s very heart touching, we thank all kind people that involved bringing her new chance at life with truly of love. Courtesy: โชติ บก
Views: 71361 AnimalSTEP Official
Dr. Becker on Cryptococcal Infection
 
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http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2013/03/18/cryptococcal-infection.aspx Dr. Karen Becker, a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian, discusses a common infection in pets called cryptococcal infections.
Views: 3804 MercolaHealthyPets
Feline Ischemic Encephalopathy in Cats
 
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Concerned that your cat may have Ischemic Encephalophathy? Here are some signs and symptoms to watch out for: neurological signs like seizures, circling movements, alter behavior like unexplained aggression, and blindness. Feline ischemic encephalopathy (FIE) is caused by the presence of a parasite, the Cuterebra larva, in a cat's brain.
Views: 495 petMD
Feline Idiopathic Chronic Cystitis
 
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http://healthypets.mercola.com/ Dr. Karen Becker, a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian discusses the symptoms of Feline Idiopathic Chronic Cystitis and what to do if your cat experiences it.
Views: 18730 Mercola
Cryptococcosis
 
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Views: 636 Trivian Vladmore
Princess Pillsbury || FieldHaven Feline Center
 
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One cold day in February, Dr. Heather Kennedy received at call FieldHaven from Best Friends Animal Society, which has a community cat program in Stanislaus County. They had received a community cat with a sever case of cryptococcus, a very serious systemic fungal infection. Most likely infected due to her exposure to pigeon droppings, she had severe swelling (We will spare you the photos when she first came to us.) A cat with such a severe infection would normally be euthanized, but this sweet kitty rubbed up against her rescuers and began “making muffins” on them. She didn’t seem to be in extreme distress and definitely had a will to live. Best Friends asked if FieldHaven would take on her care. Once Dr. Kennedy met the newly named Princess Pillsbury, the answer was “Yes!” Because her face was so swollen and her respiratory system infected, Princess Pillsbury couldn’t smell and lost the desire to eat. Dr. Kennedy placed a feeding tube in so the Princess can receive food and her medication several times a day. Dr. Kennedy has been consulting with the world’s leading expert in cryptococcus, Dr. Rickard Malik, from the University of Sydney in Australia, on Princess Pillsbury’s case. With their care, this kitty has made leaps and bounds in her recovery and has shown a little sass along with her sweet side. Now that she only has to receive medication twice per day, Princess Pillsbury has relocated from the shelter to Dr. Kennedy’s home. You can see her perched on her favorite pillow in her foster home and you can see what a sweetie she is in the video below. Only because of supporters like you can FieldHaven spend the time and money necessary to give this deserving kitty the chance to live a happy and healthy life with a new family. She has a long way to go yet in her recovery, but we are confident that she will be adoptable and will make a wonderful addition to someone’s home. #FieldHavenFelineCenter #AdoptDontShop FOLLOW US ONLINE! Website: www.fieldhaven.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/fieldhaven FIELDHAVEN MARKETPLACE Website: www.fieldhavenmarketplace.com Facebook: www.facebook.com/fieldhavenmarketplace CLASSICS, CATS & CABERNET Website: www.classicscatsandcabernet.com
Dr. Karen Becker Discusses Megacolon
 
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http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2012/11/26/megacolon.aspx Dr. Karen Becker, a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian discusses megacolon.
Views: 14378 MercolaHealthyPets
Sporotrichosis & Sporothrix schenckii
 
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Sporotrichosis is an infection caused by a fungus known as Sporothrix schenckii. Outbreaks of sporotrichosis have been documented in the United States, Western Australia, and Brazil. The exact incidence of sporotrichosis is unknown, but people at increased risk for sporotrichosis usually have occupational or recreational exposures related to agriculture, horticulture, forestry, or gardening. The fungus lives throughout the world in soil, plants, and decaying vegetation. Cutaneous (skin) infection is the most common form of infection, although pulmonary infection can occur if a person inhales the microscopic, airborne fungal spores. Most cases of sporotrichosis are sporadic and are associated with minor skin trauma like cuts and scrapes; however, outbreaks have been linked to activities that involve handling contaminated vegetation such as moss, hay, or wood.
Views: 12513 Paul Cochrane
Cat falling over, losing balance (new video) (neurologic disease)
 
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This is recent video (March 2014) of my 5-year old cat losing his balance from undiagnosed neurologic disease. The videos referenced below are from late 2013, so you can see the progression of the disease. His balance is getting worse and worse, but he doesn't seem to be in pain, his appetite is normal, and he still likes to play. And as you can see, he gets up and keeps going each time he falls. He's a fighter! *********** My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see other video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in THIS VIDEO at 18 seconds); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. Here is a seizure caught on video (but it's slightly blurry: http://youtu.be/wpV-FchJxeA). There is also a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q); • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures. (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 50764 Susie Lorden
Nasopharyngeal polyp removal in a cat
 
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Dr Magnifico a small animal veterinarian removes a polyp from the back part of a cats mouth (nasopharyngeal polyp). What does a polyp look like? How is it diagnosed and how to remove one, along with the cost. For more information on these ask for free at Pawbly.com
Views: 1961 Krista Magnifico
Sporotrichosis: Most Important Points
 
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Sporotrichosis is an infection caused by a fungus known as Sporothrix schenckii. Outbreaks of sporotrichosis have been documented in the United States, . These videos are the medical lectures given by Paul Kattupalli MD for educating health care professionals and people seeking medical information. Sporotrichosis Top # 8 Facts. ◅ Sporotrichosis treatment — Finding the right information about Sporotrichosis treatment & symptoms, is crucial to managing Sporotrichosis .
Views: 544 Hollis Lizzette
Feline Focal Seizure Post-ictal Lethargy
 
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FELINE FOCAL SEIZURE: A focal seizure refers to an abnormal surge of electrical activity that is confined to a specific area of the brain. Unlike a generalized seizure, in which the animal’s entire brain is affected and therefore the entire body shows signs of a seizure, a focal seizure only affects a localized region of the brain and therefore only has limited effects on the body. These affects may vary significantly, depending on which portion of the brain is affected. POST-ICTAL PHASE: During the post-ictal phase, there is confusion, disorientation, salivation, pacing, restlessness and/or temporary blindness. This video shows our cat who spent an entire day dazed & confused, refusing to sleep. She is obviously exhausted here, but won't allow herself to fall asleep. OUR CAT, LUCREZIA, THE DETAILS: Lucrezia is our 3 year old female cat who had what we now believe to be a FOCAL SEIZURE in the early hours of the morning on 12/30/18. Total post-ictal phase lasted until evening of 12/31/18. At first we didn't know what was wrong with her, she was just acting strange. She was VERY vocal & wouldn't stop meowing and yowling. She took off running like a nut, so I thought she just needed to play a bit and let off some steam. I played with her & during this time I noticed something was up with one or both of her hind legs. She was running around the corner & sliding a bit. We noticed she was having a hard time climbing her cat tree, like her legs were weak. She even fell off her cat tree from the top to 2nd tier where she caught herself. She seemed disoriented. Confused. She was walking a little weird. And, finally, my husband and I decided to take her into the ER around 6am. The vet examined her & said she appeared fine, & she couldn't see the strange behavior or hind leg weakness. So, we decided on blood pressure, Bloodwork & urinalysis to see if there were any issues with her kidneys, white blood cells, etc. And, they sent us home. That's when things got worse. We decided to take video of her strange behavior, so we'd have evidence this time when we met with the Neurologist. I'll upload the video of her trying to sit and SWAYING wildly back & forth. She lost her balance every time she tried to groom herself. She walked to places, walked away, walked right back - totally confused & disoriented. She DEVOURED her food, like she was eating out of anxiety. Food flying everywhere. Same with her water, she was drinking like crazy. Around 5pm, we called the vet back & made an appt with the Neurologist on 12/31/18. We saw the Neurologist at 10am, & she'd been able to get the results of her urinalysis & bloodwork (all of which came back totally fine). She took her in the back to watch her walk, how she reacted, etc. Of course, Lucrezia was terrified & appeared normal. However, that's when we busted out the video footage - we had evidence this time After watching this video & several others that I'll also post, the neurologist explained that she thought she was in the post-ictal phase of a seizure. Most likely a Focal seizure, since we hadn't noticed any body seizures. She just didn't know WHY she was having them. Next step, to find out if what's causing her seizures is external like a virus, fungus, or deficiency. So, we did additional testing for FIP, FeLv, Cryptococcus, Toxoplasmosis, & a protein test to treat her liver function. By the way, all of these came back negative & she appears otherwise healthy. Although, she did test positive in "the low end" for the Coronavirus, but negative for it on "the high end." Apparently, 90% of indoor cats are positive for antibodies for Coronavirus that can lead to FIP (Feline infectious peritonitis), a fatal mutation that typically kills kittens & elderly cats. Most cats are exposed to this virus & they really don't know what causes it to mutate in some cats & kill them. I have to say this totally freaked me out, even though I was assured that it wasn't an issue since she was otherwise very healthy. So, what now? She has something wrong internally, INSIDE her brain. It could be many things, so just steps it's an MRI (which she'd need anesthesia for) and a spinal tap. During her physical, the vet also noted she had a "3 out 6" Heart Murmur. I guess that means it's not bad, but I want to make sure there's nothing else going on there before they put her under anesthesia. If she has an underlying heart condition, anesthesia could kill her. They do it differently with cats that have a heart condition, so we'll need to do an EKG first. Since Lucrezia was 100% back to her nornal self by three afternoon on 12/31/18, we've decided to hold off on the MRI for right now. I'm going to see how she does the next couple of weeks & then most likely schedule it, one she gets cleared after the EKG. Anyways, I'll post these videos & any updates, as needed. I want to share this with my fellow pet parents, since YouTube was one of the first places I went to for help.
Views: 56 C Con
🔶 SPOROTRICHOSIS - You and your pet can get it (with captions)
 
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References and suggestions: https://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.1005638 - Sporothrix Species Causing Outbreaks in Animals and Humans Driven by Animal–Animal Transmission (Rodrigues et al., 2016) https://journals.plos.org/plospathogens/article?id=10.1371/journal.ppat.1006077 - Zoonotic Epidemic of Sporotrichosis: Cat to Human Transmission (Gremião et al., 2017) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3194828/ - Sporothrix schenckii and Sporotrichosis (Barros et al., 2011) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4295339/ - Sporotrichosis: An Overview and Therapeutic Options (Mahajan, 2014) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5674690/ - Sporotrichosis: an update on epidemiology, etiopathogenesis, laboratory and clinical therapeutics (Orofino-Costa et al., 2017) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22682194 - Sporotrichosis (Vásquez-del-Mercado et al., 2012) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25526781 - Global epidemiology of sporotrichosis (Chakrabarti et al., 2015) https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/30009528 - Sporotrichosis in Southern Brazil, towards an epidemic? (Poester et al., 2018) https://www.cdc.gov/fungal/diseases/sporotrichosis/index.html - CDC, Fungal diseases, Sporotrichosis https://www.gaffi.org/wp-content/uploads/Sporotrichosis-GAFFI-Fact-sheet-v4-.pdf - Global Action Fund for Fungal Infections, Felix Bongomin, 2018 http://agencia.fapesp.br/sporotrichosis-an-emerging-disease-that-affects-cats-can-be-transmitted-to-humans/25049/ - Sporotrichosis, an emerging disease that affects cats, can be transmitted to humans (Agência FAPESP, Peter Moon, 2017) https://youtu.be/qC655Dr7J5I - Sporotrichosis by Prof Alexandro Bonifaz, Hospital General de Mexico (Leading International Fungal Education) Want more videos? Support the channel and subscribe. 😉 Welcome. This project has the ultimate goal of helping you prevent some common diseases and maintain a healthy life. This channel’s videos also attempt to debunk some myths and spread science-based knowledge. References are displayed in the slides, so that viewers can read full texts. But no reference or video is presented just to be swallowed with bigotry. Perhaps one of the mainstays of science and reason is doubt; therefore, viewers are not expected to accept and agree with every evidence, article, or statement. The comments section is enabled, so you’re free to share your ideas and critiques. It is also good to bear in mind that the research which built the basis for these videos was limited - thus, might have ignored important information - and that science is ever-changing. As new articles are published daily, part of this content may become obsolete or incorrect. Moreover, even recent articles could have wrong conclusions, and flaws regarding methodology and data analysis. Hence, it is always better to consider many studies than to attach too much weight to just one conclusion. Epidemiological studies also have other problems: they don’t distinguish so well between causality and mere correlation, and their results cannot be perfectly extrapolated to people that did not take part in them. Differences among persons (behavioral, environmental, genetic) generate confounding variables that are sometimes ignored. Professionals and specialists can help in solving doubts and in adapting generalizations to a specific individual. If you wish to help translating this video, you can select the gear icon in the player, Subtitles/CC, Add subtitles or CC (https://support.google.com/youtube/answer/6054623). Otherwise, you can use this link: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_video?ref=share&v=17K2ApGDHBI
Views: 84 Pyrro of Elis
Fungus in the Lungs | Monsters Inside Me
 
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Subscribe to Animal Planet! | http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=animalplanettv A school girl cannot understand why she's finding it so hard to breathe, until the is revealed that there is a fungus spreading throughout her lungs. | For more Monsters Inside Me, visit http://animal.discovery.com/tv/monsters-inside-me/#mkcpgn=ytapl1
Views: 57775 Animal Planet
Cat Asthma Attack -- what to look for in your kitty
 
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Poor Casper. After rescuing this big boy from the outdoors (his previous owner's abandoned him), we found him doing this strange cough. It didn't look like a hairball cough and happened often enough that it concerned us. So we took this video to show our vet. And sure enough, this is the telltale sign of kitty asthma. They also took X-rays to verify. This is what a feline asthma attack looks and sounds like. During an asthma attack, a cat will put his head down near the ground and stretch his neck out (like a seal). This is not a hairball cough. Feline asthma affects approximately 1% of the american domestic feline population. Casper is now taking a steroid, Prednisolone, daily which has helped to decrease the frequency of his attacks. If you see your cat doing this, take him to the vet for a check-up.
Views: 505079 MeowValet
Seefah suffers cryptococcosis.
 
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ผ่าน YouTube capture
Views: 131 SaveThaiStrayS
What are the benefits of neutering my cat?
 
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What are the benefits of neutering my cat? What are the benefits of neutering my cat? Are you thinking of sterilizing your cat? It is a common practice that most domestic cats undergo to improve their quality of life and prevent them from wandering off in search of a mate. There are many people who are against this practice and consider it a...
Views: 94 Laza Channel
Ignored Adult cat Was found by Hearted Man, And he has a better life Now
 
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Ignored Adult cat Was found by Hearted Man, And he has a better life Now. Skimble stray six years cat who was begging food from people and many people ignored him- except one man, the man brought him to local vet . Skimble reached out to the rescue organization called Milo’s Sanctuary. and they agreed to take care of him. Michelle from Milo’s Sanctuary said Skimble was diagnosed with Cryptococcus, which is a severe fungal infection and it can several years before Skimble is free from the infection. The test result was negative, but it still could be in his system. he looks great after months of treatment and he is happy now, Skimble is now part of Milo’s Lifetime Care Program. and he will never live her life in the streets again. #cat #cats #cat_video ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For Any Copyright Issues Please Contact Us : [email protected] ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/mypetssite/ Twitter : https://twitter.com/mypetssite Pintrest: https://www.pinterest.com/mypetssite Tumblr : https://mypetssite.tumblr.com/ ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- You can download our application for pets wallpaper : https://goo.gl/S24sus ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.mypets.pet/ ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Views: 1449 My Pets
Edie and her nasopharyngeal polyp removal. See how what this looks like and how big they can get.
 
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Dr Magnifico is a small animal veterinarian who sees a lot of cats with polyps. This cat found me after her parents watched another one of my videos. Edie’s parents wanted someone to look for a polyp. The referring vet wanted her to see a specialist for endoscopy. If your cat has a chronic snore and nasal discharge please investigate for an oropharyngeal polyp. It may be the answer. For free pet help, or questions about this procedure ask me on Pawbly.com.
Views: 752 Krista Magnifico
Retropharyngeal polyp in cat - Veterinary Video
 
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From Michelle Gonzalez-Monska: "Large retropharyngeal polyp in cat with chronic respiratory infection. Video shows pre and post of the cat as well as normal versus patient’s CT scan and removal." See more veterinary cases and news: www.iloveveterinary.com Find the coolest veterinary inspired gifts: store.iloveveterinary.com
Views: 224 I Love Veterinary
Feline focal seizure Post-ictal phase
 
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FELINE FOCAL SEIZURE: A focal seizure refers to an abnormal surge of electrical activity that is confined to a specific area of the brain. Unlike a generalized seizure, in which the animal’s entire brain is affected and therefore the entire body shows signs of a seizure, a focal seizure only affects a localized region of the brain and therefore only has limited effects on the body. These affects may vary significantly, depending on which portion of the brain is affected. POST-ICTAL PHASE: During the post-ictal phase, there is confusion, disorientation, salivation, pacing, restlessness and/or temporary blindness. This video shows our cat who spent an entire day dazed & confused, refusing to sleep. She is obviously exhausted here, but won't allow herself to fall asleep. OUR CAT, LUCREZIA, THE DETAILS: Lucrezia is our 3 year old female cat who had what we now believe to be a FOCAL SEIZURE in the early hours of the morning on 12/30/18. Total post-ictal phase lasted until evening of 12/31/18. At first we didn't know what was wrong with her, she was just acting strange. She was VERY vocal & wouldn't stop meowing and yowling. She took off running like a nut, so I thought she just needed to play a bit and let off some steam. I played with her & during this time I noticed something was up with one or both of her hind legs. She was running around the corner & sliding a bit. We noticed she was having a hard time climbing her cat tree, like her legs were weak. She even fell off her cat tree from the top to 2nd tier where she caught herself. She seemed disoriented. Confused. She was walking a little weird. And, finally, my husband and I decided to take her into the ER around 6am. The vet examined her & said she appeared fine, & she couldn't see the strange behavior or hind leg weakness. So, we decided on blood pressure, Bloodwork & urinalysis to see if there were any issues with her kidneys, white blood cells, etc. And, they sent us home. That's when things got worse. We decided to take video of her strange behavior, so we'd have evidence this time when we met with the Neurologist. I'll upload the video of her trying to sit and SWAYING wildly back & forth. She lost her balance every time she tried to groom herself. She walked to places, walked away, walked right back - totally confused & disoriented. She DEVOURED her food, like she was eating out of anxiety. Food flying everywhere. Same with her water, she was drinking like crazy. Around 5pm, we called the vet back & made an appt with the Neurologist on 12/31/18. We saw the Neurologist at 10am, & she'd been able to get the results of her urinalysis & bloodwork (all of which came back totally fine). She took her in the back to watch her walk, how she reacted, etc. Of course, Lucrezia was terrified & appeared normal. However, that's when we busted out the video footage - we had evidence this time After watching this video & several others that I'll also post, the neurologist explained that she thought she was in the post-ictal phase of a seizure. Most likely a Focal seizure, since we hadn't noticed any body seizures. She just didn't know WHY she was having them. Next step, to find out if what's causing her seizures is external like a virus, fungus, or deficiency. So, we did additional testing for FIP, FeLv, Cryptococcus, Toxoplasmosis, & a protein test to treat her liver function. By the way, all of these came back negative & she appears otherwise healthy. Although, she did test positive in "the low end" for the Coronavirus, but negative for it on "the high end." Apparently, 90% of indoor cats are positive for antibodies for Coronavirus that can lead to FIP (Feline infectious peritonitis), a fatal mutation that typically kills kittens & elderly cats. Most cats are exposed to this virus & they really don't know what causes it to mutate in some cats & kill them. I have to say this totally freaked me out, even though I was assured that it wasn't an issue since she was otherwise very healthy. So, what now? She has something wrong internally, INSIDE her brain. It could be many things, so just steps it's an MRI (which she'd need anesthesia for) and a spinal tap. During her physical, the vet also noted she had a "3 out 6" Heart Murmur. I guess that means it's not bad, but I want to make sure there's nothing else going on there before they put her under anesthesia. If she has an underlying heart condition, anesthesia could kill her. They do it differently with cats that have a heart condition, so we'll need to do an EKG first. Since Lucrezia was 100% back to her nornal self by three afternoon on 12/31/18, we've decided to hold off on the MRI for right now. I'm going to see how she does the next couple of weeks & then most likely schedule it, one she gets cleared after the EKG. Anyways, I'll post these videos & any updates, as needed. I want to share this with my fellow pet parents, since YouTube was one of the first places I went to for help.
Views: 76 C Con
#5 Cat muscle spasm (degenerative neurologic disease)
 
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This video shows my 5-year old cat with degenerative neurologic disease twitching when he lays down (at .3, .8, .18, .21, and .27 seconds in this video - though it's kind of hard to see in this video). My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see videos at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in this video at 18 seconds: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA&feature=youtu.be); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. Here is a seizure caught on video (but it's slightly blurry: http://youtu.be/wpV-FchJxeA). There is also a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q); • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see THIS VIDEO at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 43441 Susie Lorden
#2 Cat losing balance, falling over, head bobbing (degenerative neurologic disease)
 
00:40
My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see other video at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk, and http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in THIS VIDEO at 18 seconds); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. Here is a seizure caught on video (but it's slightly blurry: http://youtu.be/wpV-FchJxeA). There is also a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q); • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures. (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 61876 Susie Lorden
Dr. Becker Talks About Pyothorax
 
05:31
http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2013/03/04/pyothorax-infection.aspx Dr. Karen Becker, a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian, talks about pyothorax, an infection in the chest cavity.
Views: 6542 MercolaHealthyPets
Communicating Risk (Cryptococcosis)
 
02:04
Group 3 WHS Assignment 2016
Cryptococcus gattii Deadly Fungus Spreads Killing-United States / Canada
 
01:52
This Version of Cryptococcus gattii has been Genetically Modified and is Resistant to Treatment leaving a Trail of Death. Canada and United States have New Cases of Great Numbers to point of concern. This novel fungus is worrisome because it appears to be a threat to otherwise healthy people. This is Spreading to ALL types of Animals , even DOLPHINS!!! Read More: http://www.emaxhealth.com/1275/fungus-cryptococcus-gatti-threat-healthy-people.html Infection with C. gattii causes symptoms about two weeks or more after individuals or animals have been exposed to the airborne spores. Once the spores are inhaled, they embed themselves in the lungs, colonize, and then spread throughout the body. Symptoms include persistent cough, pneumonia, sharp chest pains, shortness of breath, fever, weight loss, headache, and nighttime sweats. Meningitis can also occur.
Views: 11404 855h0le
Veterinary Endoscopy: Nasal carcinoma in cat.
 
04:06
Exhibition and retrograde biopsy of nasal carcinoma in cat using flexib\ le endoscope. www.ayoraendoscopiaveterinaria.es
Cryptococcus Gattii - Joe Halliday, DO
 
32:50
Dr. Joseph Halliday discusses an emerging fungal pathogen, C. gattii and the recent outbreaks in the Northwest US and British Columbia. C. gattii is an encapsulated yeast most often seen in immunocompromised patients, but epidemic varieties infect immunocompetent patients as well. He also discusses the presence of endemic C. gattii, clinical manifestations of this fungal infection, diagnosis, management, and complications. IDPodcasts brings you essential updates in medical infectious diseases learning, brought to you from the University of South Florida’s Division of Infectious Disease. Stay in touch! Download our app on the Itunes store or find us below: Subscribe to our Youtube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/IDPodcasts Visit us on our webpage: http://www.idpodcasts.net/USF_ID_Podcasts/Main/Main.html Follow us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ID-Podcasts-216965201680987/ Tweet to us: https://twitter.com/idpodcasts
Views: 971 IDPodcasts
#1 Cat falling over, losing balance (degenerative neurologic disease)
 
00:25
My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see other videos at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk, and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in this video at 18 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. Here is a seizure caught on video (but it's slightly blurry: http://youtu.be/wpV-FchJxeA). There is also a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q); • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 3954 Susie Lorden
A Medicine Engineered by Me || Fungul Infection on head || My Story |
 
02:38
Tinea capitis (also known as "herpes tonsurans","ringworm of the hair", "ringworm of the scalp","scalp ringworm", and "tinea tonsurans") is a cutaneous fungal infection (dermatophytosis) of the scalp. The disease is primarily caused by dermatophytes in the Trichophyton and Microsporum genera that invade the hair shaft. The clinical presentation is typically single or multiple patches of hair loss, sometimes with a 'black dot' pattern (often with broken-off hairs), that may be accompanied by inflammation, scaling, pustules, and itching. Uncommon in adults, tinea capitis is predominantly seen in pre-puberta  children, more often boys than girls. Must watch Used reference Al Thahabia fil tibb A golden dissertation by Imam Ali Reza a.s. Acinetobacter baumannii Acinetobacter infections Actinomyces israelii, Actinomyces gerencseriae and Propionibacterium propionicus Actinomycosis Trypanosoma brucei African sleeping sickness (African trypanosomiasis) HIV (Human immunodeficiency virus) AIDS (Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) Entamoeba histolytica Amoebiasis Anaplasma species Anaplasmosis Angiostrongylus Angiostrongyliasis Anisakis Anisakiasis Bacillus anthracis Anthrax Arcanobacterium haemolyticum Arcanobacterium haemolyticum infection Junin virus Argentine hemorrhagic fever usually Burkholderia cepacia and other Burkholderia species Burkholderia infection Mycobacterium ulcerans Buruli ulcer Caliciviridae family Calicivirus infection (Norovirus and Sapovirus) Campylobacter species Campylobacteriosis Ketoconazole: Inhibits the growth of common dermatophytes & yeasts Highly effective against the malassezia species yeasts, a major cause of dandruff and seborrhoeic dermatitis. Reduces scaling pruritus & redness. Effectively prevents relapse when used prophylactically. ZPTO (Zinc Pyrithione): Co-ordination complex of Zinc used as anti-fungal & anti-bacterial agent. Controls flaking & seborrhoea. usually Candida albicans and other Candida species Candidiasis (Moniliasis; Thrush) Intestinal disease by Capillaria philippinensis, hepatic disease by Capillaria hepatica and pulmonary disease by Capillaria aerophila Capillariasis Bartonella bacilliformis Carrion's disease Bartonella henselae Cat-scratch disease usually Group A Streptococcus and Staphylococcus Cellulitis Trypanosoma cruzi Chagas Disease (American trypanosomiasis) Haemophilus ducreyi Chancroid Varicella zoster virus (VZV) Chickenpox Alphavirus Chikungunya Chlamydia trachomatis Chlamydia Chlamydophila pneumoniae Chlamydophila pneumoniae infection (Taiwan acute respiratory agent or TWAR) Vibrio cholerae Cholera usually Fonsecaea pedrosoi Chromoblastomycosis Batrachochytrium dendrabatidis Chytridiomycosis Clonorchis sinensis Clonorchiasis Clostridium difficile Clostridium difficile colitis Coccidioides immitis and Coccidioides posadasii Coccidioidomycosis Colorado tick fever virus (CTFV) Colorado tick fever (CTF) usually rhinoviruses and coronaviruses Common cold (Acute viral rhinopharyngitis; Acute coryza) PRNP Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD) Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) Cryptococcus neoformans Cryptococcosis Cryptosporidium species Cryptosporidiosis usually Ancylostoma braziliense; multiple other parasites Cutaneous larva migrans (CLM) Cyclospora cayetanensis Cyclosporiasis Taenia solium Cysticercosis Cytomegalovirus Cytomegalovirus infection Dengue viruses (DEN-1, DEN-2, DEN-3 and DEN-4) – Flaviviruses Dengue fever Green algae Desmodesmus armatus Desmodesmus infection Dientamoeba fragilis Dientamoebiasis Corynebacterium diphtheriae Diphtheria Diphyllobothrium Diphyllobothriasis Dracunculus medinensis Dracunculiasis Ebolavirus (EBOV) Ebola hemorrhagic fever Echinococcus species Echinococcosis Ehrlichia species Ehrlichiosis Enterobius vermicularis Enterobiasis (Pinworm infection) Enterococcus species Enterococcus infection Enterovirus species Enterovirus infection Rickettsia prowazekii Epidemic typhus Parvovirus B19 Erythema infectiosum (Fifth disease) Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) and Human herpesvirus 7 (HHV-7) Exanthem subitum (Sixth disease) Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica Fasciolasis Fasciolopsis buski Fasciolopsiasis PRNP Fatal familial insomnia (FFI) Filarioidea superfamily Filariasis Clostridium perfringens Food poisoning by Clostridium perfringens multiple Free-living amebic infection Fusobacterium species Fusobacterium infection usually Clostridium perfringens; other Clostridium species Gas gangrene (Clostridial myonecrosis) Geotrichum candidum Geotrichosis PRNP Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome (GSS) Giardia lamblia Giardiasis plasmosis (HGA) Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) Human metapneumovirus infection Epstein–Barr virus infectious mononucleosis (Mono) Orthomyxoviridae family Influenza (flu) Isospora belli Isosporiasis
Views: 124 Altamash Haider
Cat Reiki - Recovers from Leprosy
 
06:53
Interview by Valee More, Reiki Teacher with Maggie Tarver owner of Nefi who had leprosy from the age of around 2 years old. http://reikihealing-info.com/reiki-for-pets--courses.html
Views: 206 Valee More
Dr. Becker Discusses Canine Leptospirosis
 
07:32
http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2013/02/25/canine-leptospirosis.aspx Dr. Karen Becker, a proactive and integrative wellness veterinarian, discusses canine leptospirosis, which is found in most domesticated and wild animals.
Views: 28738 MercolaHealthyPets
Cat having seizure (neurologic disease)
 
01:19
Here is video of my 5-year old cat, Churro, having a seizure (or muscle spasm?). See his legs sticking straight out, trembling from his muscles tensed rock solid, his head strained backwards. The episode lasted until he's placed down on the floor. These episodes have been getting steadily worse over the last year or so, as his neurologic disease progresses. Sorry the video starts out blurry! *********** My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see videos at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in THIS VIDEO at 18 seconds); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. This is in this video, and also there is a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q), but I haven't caught the full-body seizure on video; • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures. (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 24289 Susie Lorden
Feline Rhinoscopy
 
03:44
Do you have a feline friend that always has a stuffy nose? Dr. Dhaliwal explains a rhinoscopy procedure with a Kitty that had years of nasal discharge. In this video, Kitty is fully anesthetized so he's comfortable. A rhinoscopy (scoping of the nasal cavity) can be used for fact finding when dogs or cats have a suspected foreign body or tumour, constant or reoccurring discharge or obstructed breathing through their nose. A rhinoscopy allows veterinarians to view the inside of a nasal cavity on a screen, and prevents a pet from having to endure an invasive surgical procedure.
Feline Nose Scope
 
01:36
Mass on ventral surface of rt nostril. Extremely noisy and raspy breathing. Cat also has large mass in abdomen.
Views: 857 Kenneth Jones DVM
#4 Cat, head dropping (degenerative neurologic disease)
 
00:10
This video shows my 5-yr old cat's head dropping down to the ground after he's been looking up. (It's one of many symptoms of his degenerative neurologic disease). My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see other videos at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA.); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in this video at 18 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IxK9S7pHUDg&feature=youtu.be; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. Here is a seizure caught on video (but it's slightly blurry: http://youtu.be/wpV-FchJxeA). There is also a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q); • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures. (THIS VIDEO) and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 1719 Susie Lorden
Removing a Tumor Under the Skin: Mast Cell Tumor Cat
 
05:19
Sylvester was diagnosed with a mast cell tumor from under the skin on his legs. Fortunately, the tumor which can spread in dogs, is relatively benign in cats.
Views: 14355 Greg Martinez DVM
#3 Cat losing balance, wobbles (degenerative neurologic disease)
 
00:15
My 5-year old cat Churro is suffering from an undiagnosed degenerative neurologic disease. He started developing balance problems when he was only 2 ½ years old by miscalculating distances when he tried to jump. At 3 ½ years, he was losing his ability to jump at all; his gait started to change into a high-stepped, deliberate gait; and he was having a harder time coordinating his steps to run. He also started having periodic seizures where his body would freeze up for several seconds (I call these episodes "seizures" for lack of another word, but the vets tell me they're not seizures because his body isn't convulsing, he isn't foaming at the mouth, etc.) These symptoms kept progressing, and now at 5 years old, he: • Can't run or jump at all; • Falls over when he walks (see other videos at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tIx7YJRxqCk; http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6KTy5GTH_OI&feature=youtu.be); and https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA.); • Has difficulty walking and controlling his legs (it's like he's losing the ability to control where his legs go and his back legs are atrophying); • Is losing the ability to perceive distance because his nose bumps into things when he sniffs them; • Has a hard time focusing and his head will bob a little bit sometimes when he's trying to focus (you can see a little bit of his head bob in this video at 18 seconds: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=metywqDtjkA&feature=youtu.be); And look how his body wobbles when he walks between the couch and the wall in THIS VIDEO; • Has seizure episodes where his whole body tenses up, his legs stick straight out, his head pulls back, and his eye go wide and blank for about 5-10 seconds. His whole body turns rock solid and every muscle tenses up. Here is a seizure caught on video (but it's slightly blurry: http://youtu.be/wpV-FchJxeA). There is also a slight example of his body freezing up in this video at 16 seconds(http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svnlg2SJo6Q); • Drops his head straight down to the ground after he looks up or backwards, and when he's coming out of his seizures (you can see an example of his head dropping down to the ground after looking backwards at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNEMBY3feMY); and • Muscles twitch a lot when he's lying down (see this video at 3, 8, 18, 21, and 27 seconds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mf0ywEMkZxQ). Despite all of this, Churro is still the same ornery and fun-loving cat he has always been, which is why it's so incredibly sad and painful to watch him deteriorate from this undiagnosed neurologic disease. TREATMENT: Churro has been to three different neurologists (one at a vet school), and several internists to try to figure out what's going on. He's had a slew of tests and has been on every antibiotic imaginable in case it was a brain infection, but the tests were inconclusive and no drugs helped him. The final diagnosis was simply that he has degenerative brain disease (degenerative cerebellar abiotrophy?). I'd be really interested to see if anyone has any thoughts or ideas. TESTS/PROCEDURES: 1. Ear infection (April '12): treated and cured w/ DMSO drops. 2. CT scan (May '12) showed large mass in left nasal sinus and septum deviated to right. 3. Rhinoscopy (May '12) to clear out mass. Biopsy showed chronic rhinitis. 4. Cryptococcus test: normal 5. Toxoplasmosis test: normal 6. Thyroid test: normal 7. UPenn genetic testing: normal 8. MRI and CSF Spinal tap (August 8th, 2012): Brain normal, fluid normal. ANTIBIOTICS/DRUGS: Zeniquen, Chloramphenicol, Cefpodoxime, Levofloxacin, Doxycycline, Clindamycin, SMZ/TMP (sulfa-methoxazole trimethoprim), prednisone.
Views: 2424 Susie Lorden
Protozoa: CNS
 
10:29
3. Protozoa 3 CNS This video is part of a comprehensive medical school microbiology, immunology & infectious diseases course. Your comments on videos will be key as we iterate content. If you are interested in implementing all or part of this course, we are happy to share and would only ask for your candid evaluation in return: https://stanfordmedicine.qualtrics.com/SE/?SID=SV_8i98rRk2XRCXQ45 If you are interested in collaborating with us, please contact: [email protected] This course was created collaboratively between Stanford, UW, Duke, UCSF, and University of Michigan and made possible by support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.
Cutaneous and Subcutaneous Mycosis (Intro)
 
01:17
Sqadia video is the demonstration of Cutaneous and Subcutaneous Mycosis. Mycosis in humans and domestic animals, is a disease caused by any fungus that invades the tissues, causing superficial, subcutaneous, or systemic disease. Some of these fungi can cause infection when they gain entry through a wound; others mainly cause opportunistic infections in immunocompromised patients. There are four types of human fungal disease according to depth and extent of infection: Superficial mycoses, cutaneous mycoses, subcutaneous mycoses, and systemic or deep mycoses. The clinical nomenclatures used for the mycoses are based on the Site of the infection, Route of acquisition of the pathogen, and Type of virulence exhibited by the fungus. The primary pathogens have relatively well-defined geographic ranges; the opportunistic fungi are ubiquitous. Mycoses range in extent from superficial infections involving the outer layer of the stratum corneum of the skin to disseminated infection involving the brain, heart, lungs, liver, spleen, and kidneys. Many of the deeply invasive mycoses are difficult to diagnose early and often difficult to treat effectively. Source of fungi is endogenous or exogenous. Endogenous human is candida specie and Pneumocystis Jirovecii. Ubiquitous Environmental is Aspergillus and Zygomycetes. Regional Endemic Mycoses includes Histoplasma, Coccidioides, and Blastomyces. Widespread Endemic Mycoses are Cryptococcus and Sporothrix. Stream the COMPLETE lecture on sqadia.com https://www.sqadia.com/programs/cutaneous-and-subcutaneous-mycosis
Views: 403 sqadia.com
Sporotrichosis all thru my membranes
 
01:02
Painful, hideous from rise thorns
Views: 2024 jeanne johnson
Glowing Cells Help Fight Fungal Lung Infections | Video
 
01:39
Fungal lung infections like those caused by Histoplasma capsulatum are difficult to treat because it's hard to get rid of the fungal cells without damaging human cells. A new way to mark fungal cells by making them glow could solve that problem.
Views: 1725 LiveScience
Ashley Reeck
 
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This is our patient, two year old Ashley Reeck, a spayed domestic shorthair. The symptoms started to appear about a year ago and generally occur at a frequency of once monthly. The owners seem to think she is gradually improving. These symptoms are generally preceeded by excitement in her environment or fighting with another cat. The symptoms are non-convulsive and last for just a few minutes. The video was sent to a neurologist and this is her reply- "It looks like the kitty may be having a seizure perhaps in the vestibular area of the brain. Given the age and otherwise normal findings idiopathic epilepsy is a possibility. Other differential diagnoses would include: meningioma, congenital brain anomaly, Toxo, FELV, FIP, Cryptococcus (these seem somewhat unlikely given the duration of the problem and the normalcy of the patient between events) and CVA." Anne Anne Elizabeth Katherman, D.V.M., M.S. Diplomate ACVIM-Specialty of Neurology - practicing veterinary neurologist and inveterate beach wanderer The latest news is good. Ashley hasn't had an "event" in quite a while and is doing well.
Views: 94 thebiglewboski
In loving memory of Junior
 
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Junior passed away in my arms on our bed on January 29, 2013. This tribute is a collection of some of my favorite photos and videos and celebrates the life of my sweet kitty Junior. He was first diagnosed with diabetes and hyperthyroidism in January 2011. FelineDiabetes.com is a wonderful resource for those who have sugar kitties. If you have difficulty testing your cat, please see Junior at http://youtu.be/kXyrKSJTlYA. Junior was later diagnosed with cardiomyopathy (heart disease), asthma, thickened intestines, and cryptococcus (a nasal fungus). He passed away from congestive heart failure. RIP my sweet Junior. I miss you.
Views: 1137 mauiguppy
Mr Sniffles NEEDS your HELP!!
 
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This poor fella was living in a feral colony where a friend feeds - in the San Fernando Valley (of LA County). The area is industrial with no green space and the poor creatures that live here are subjected to all kinds of chemicals and inhalants on a daily basis. Mr. Sniffles showed up for dinner one night and we noticed he was having trouble breathing... also, that his face appeared distorted and swollen. I caught him with my Drop Trap and took him to the vet the following morning. He was neutered, vaccinated, given a Convenia injection (an antibiotic) and was referred to another vet office - to test for a possible fungal infection called, Cryptococcus (usually transmitted through bird droppings). But it came back negative. We've taken him to two more vets who have said taking X-rays will not help because the area between his eyes (in his sinus cavity) is so dense. After being examined, repeatedly, we're told the same thing, that a biopsy should be done... however, the problem is that the bone is too hard to get a needle through. It's recommended he go to a specialist for facial surgery. This is not something we can afford. Some have recommended humane euthanization... especially since he "was" a feral. But he has tamed up and LOVES to be pet, scratched and brushed. He also meows and purrs. PLEASE, won't you help Mr. Sniffles find a rescue or sanctuary with the financial means to properly diagnose and treat this poor boy?
Views: 309 Rhae 2TheResQ