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Ankle Pain, ankle ligaments sprain - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes conditions and treatment methods associated with pain of the ankle. High ankle sprain •A high ankle sprain is a sprain of the syndesmotic ligaments that connect the tibia and fibula at the ankle. •Diagnosis of syndesmotic injury is usually done by the use of external rotation stress view examination or CT scan. This patient may require surgery. Anterolateral impingment •Painful limitation of full range of ankle motion due to soft tissue or osseous (bony) pathology. •Soft tissue thickeneing commonly seen in athletes with prior trauama that extends into the ankle jint. •Arthroscopy of the ankle may be helpful . •Tibisl bone spur impinging on the talus can become a source of chronic ankle pain and limitation of ankle motion in athletes. Osseous (bony) spur on the anterior lip of tibia contacting the talus during dorsiflexion. The patient may need debridment of the spur. Ankle sprain •Pain that is anterior and around the fibula can usually be attributed to a ligament sprain. •Sprains result from the stretching and tearing (partial or complete) of small ligaments that can become damaged when the ankle is forced into an unnatural position. •Treatment includes immobilization, ice therapy, physical therapy and rarely surgery. •With ankle sprain, the patient will be able to walk, but it will be painful. With a fracture, the patient will be unable to walk. Pain that is posterior to the fibula can usually be attributed to an injury of the peroneal tendons. Lateral ankle pain •Patients with peroneal tendon problemes usually describe pain in the outer part of the ankle or just behind the lateral malleolus. •Problems mainly occus in the area where the tendons of the two muscles glide within a fibrous tunnel . Peroneal inflammation/ tendonitis •Tendons are subject to excessive repetitive forces causing pain and swelling. •Peroneal tendon subluxation •Usually occurs secondary to an ankle sprain with retinaculum injury. •Occurs with dorsiflexion and usually eversion of the ankle. Posterior anle pain Achilles tendonitis •Irritation and inflammation due to overuse. •Pain, swelling and tears within the tendon. •Achilles tendon can become prone to injury or rupture with age, lack of use or by aggressive exercises. •The Thompson test is performed to determine the presence of an Achilles tendon rupture. A positive result for the thompson’s test is determined by no movement of the ankle while squeezing of the calf muscles. Posterior ankle impingment •Os trigonum or large posterior process of talus (stieda syndrome) •Common among athletes such as ballet dancers. •May be seen in association with flexor hallucis longus tenosynovitis. Tarsal tunnel syndrome •Compression or squeezing on the posterior tibial nerve that produces symptoms of pain and numbness on the medial area of the ankle. •When conservative treatment methods fail, surgical treatment or tarsal tunnel release surgery may be needed. Posterior tibial tendon tears are one of the leading causes of failing arches (flatfoot) in adults. •Too many toes sign •Loss of medial arch height •Pain on the medial ankle with weight bearing Arthritis of the ankle joint •Commonly the result of a prior injury or inflammation to the ankle joint. •Can usually be easily diagnosed with an examination and x-ray. Osteochondral lesion of the talus •Arthroscopic debridment may be necessary. Please go to the following link and support the artist Johnny Widmer in his art contest - Sign to Facebook and click LIKE https://www.facebook.com/marlinmag/photos/a.10153261748858040.1073741838.134227843039/10153261754338040/?type=3&theater Thank you! https://www.facebook.com/JohnnyWidmerArt?fref=ts http://www.johnnywidmer.com/
Views: 616907 nabil ebraheim
Anterior Talofibular Ligament Sprain
 
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This Is My Video On Anterrior Talofibular Ligiment Sprain. This Is For My Principles And Terms Of Health Science Class.
Views: 36850 deh4150
ATFL injury & Treatment
 
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Views: 751 Lee Jo Anne
Anterior talofibular ligament test
 
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Test for presence of injury to the anterior talofibular ligament. The test is positive if inversion is painful with palpable tenderness over the ligament. A positive test indicates a sprained / lesion of the anterior talofibular ligament. To find out more about our work and the full range of our publications please visit our website: http://www.clinicalexams.co.uk/ The complete videos can be streamed or downloaded from our Vimeo site: https://vimeo.com/user21235595/vod_pages Excerpts and free video clips can be found on our YouTube channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyG7qeIHTBGlJqNrBi-_1NA/videos?view_as=public&shelf_id=1&view=0&sort=dd Bloomsbury Educational Limited 97 Judd Street, London, WC1H 9JB http://www.clinicalexams.co.uk/ Please subscribe to our channel to benefit from new additions. DISCLAIMER Bloomsbury Educational will not be held responsible or liable for any kind of loss or injury incurred as a result of the information conveyed in our videos. All procedures must be practiced in a supervised professional clinical setting. Andreas Syrimis, Bloomsbury Educational Limited.
Sprained Ankle Ligaments  *Home Treatment Guide!*
 
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http://www.michiganfootdoctors.com/twisted-ankle-recovery-time/ ‎ Curious to know what exactly you injured in your ankle? Well these are the types of injuries you can have and exactly what to do about them! http://www.michiganfootdoctors.com/
Views: 31243 Michigan Foot Doctors
Ankle Ligament Injury Tests & Assessment - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes the ligaments of the Ankle. An ankle sprain is usually low ankle sprain, but occasionally high ankle sprain. Other conditions associated: •Osteochondral lesion •Peroneal tendon subluxation •Lateral process fracture of the talus •Anterior process fracture of the calcaneus •High syndesmotic injury Tests for injury of these ligaments: •Anterior drawer test •Squeeze test •External rotation stress test •Talar tilt test (inversion test). If the patient can’t bear weight on the ankle, the patient should get an x-ray. Injury to the deltoid ligament occurs on the medial side of the ankle joint and usually associated with fracture. Injury to the lateral side ligament is referred to as ankle sprain. The anterior tibiofibular ligament is the west on the lateral side. Anterior drawer test: is done to test the competency of the anterior tibiofibular ligament. The test is done in 20 degrees of plantar flexion and compares it to the other side. A shift of an absolute value of 9 mm on the lateral x-ray or 5mm compared to the other side is positive. The calcaneofibular ligament is usually injured after the anterior talofibular ligament. talar tilt test: less than 5 degrees of tilt is usually normal. A high ankle sprain may require surgery. Always track the fibula proximally to avoid missing a Maisonneuve fracture. Squeeze test is used to diagnose high ankle sprain. By squeezing the tibia and fibula at the mid-calf this causes pain at the syndesmosis if high ankle sprain is present. External rotation stress test: place the ankle in a neutral position, then apply external rotation stress and get a mortise view radiograph. The positive result if the tibiofibular clear space is more than 5 mm. there is also a positive result if the medial clear space is more than 4 mm. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC
Views: 98823 nabil ebraheim
Ankle Ligament Tear Treatment
 
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Chronic ankle sprains and talofibular ligament tears are commonly treated with Prolotherapy, a regenerative injection technique. In this video, Ross Hauser, MD discusses ankle ligament tears and treatment course. To learn more about Prolo and the types of chronic pain and injuries we treat, please visit us at: http://www.caringmedical.com/prolotherapy Thanks for watching! Contact our team to tell us more about your case and see if you are a good candidate for our treatments: http://www.caringmedical.com/contact-us/ Access our published research and articles on Regenerative Medicine: http://www.prolotherapy.org/ Find us on Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/stemcellprolotherapy/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/explore/locations/1030271890/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/CaringMedical?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcamp%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/caringmedicalre/
The Talar Tilt Test | Lateral Ankle Sprain
 
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DOWNLOAD OUR APP: 📱 iPhone/iPad: https://goo.gl/eUuF7w 🤖 Android: https://goo.gl/3NKzJX GET OUR ASSESSMENT BOOK ▶︎▶︎ http://bit.ly/GETPT ◀︎◀︎ This is not medical advice. The content is intended as educational content for health care professionals and students. If you are a patient, seek care of a health care professional. The Talar Tilt Test may be used to assess a lateral ankle sprain and the integrity of the talofibular and deltoid ligaments. Article: www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10589849 Visit our Website: http://bit.ly/29xmSzV Like us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/29GyogP Follow on Instagram: http://bit.ly/29HN0Lp
Views: 142122 Physiotutors
Ankle anterior talofibular, calcaneo-fibular and posterior talofibular ligament assesssment
 
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Ankle anterior talofibular, calcaneo-fibular and posterior talofibular ligament assesssment
Views: 9406 Sheena Livingstone
Friction the Deltoid Ligaments: Unraveling the Mystery of Ankle Pain Series Preview
 
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Did you know that 25,000 people sprain their ankle every single day? After the low back, the ankle is probably the second most common area of injury. In most cases, ankle sprains do not heal well without some treatment. That's a lot of clients who need you. Unraveling the Mystery of Ankle Pain 4-part webinar series worth 6 CE hours is available at: http://www.benbenjamin.com/webinarDescrip.php?id=S_881958787 When an ankle sprain does not heal properly, it can become a chronic problem. The ligament may have been stretched or may have developed poorly formed (and therefore weak) adhesive scare tissue, causing instability at the joint. Strenuous activities continually re-tear the scar tissue, resulting in a seemingly endless cycle of pain that comes and goes, with intermittent swelling. This can continue for many years if the injury is not properly treated. Learn to assess & treat 8 varieties of Ankle Sprains in this 4-part webinar series by Dr. Ben Benjamin. You'll come away understanding the relevant anatomy and assessment for each of these conditions, as well as therapeutic techniques for those you can treat and referral guidelines for those you cannot.
Views: 25130 Ben Benjamin
Medial Ankle Ligaments
 
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Views: 103782 Catherine Blake
Tear Talofibular Ligament
 
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รักษาเอ็นข้อเท้าขาด
Views: 29322 Yolchai Jongjirasiri
ATFL and CFL with InternalBrace™ Ligament Augmentation Repair
 
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Lorenzo Gamez, MD, (Long Island, NY) discusses his augmented Brostrom procedure using InternalBrace™ ligament augmentation to repair both the ATFL and CFL. This repair incorporates knotless biocomposite SwiveLock® suture anchors and FiberTape® suture to strengthen the ligament repair at time 0 to on average 250N.1 1 American Journal of Sports Medicine. 2014;42(2):405‐411. doi: 10.1177/0363546513510141.
Collateral and Cruciate Ligaments of the Knee
 
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An animated description of the four main stabilizing ligaments of the knee: ACL, PCL, MCL, LCL
Views: 9359 ORTHOfilms
Ankle Ligaments Anatomy - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes the anatomy of the ankle ligaments. The ankle joint is made of three bones, the tibia, the fibula and the talus. The tibia is the major bone of the lower leg which bears the majority of the body weight. At the angle, the bump of the tibia forms the medial malleolus. The fibula is the smaller of the two bone of the leg. The lateral end of the fibula forms the lateral malleolus. In the ankle joint the talus articulates with the tibia. The talus is involved in multiple movements of the foot. There are ligaments in the ankle that provide connections between the bones. Injury to any of these ligaments may occur when the foot twists, rolls or turns beyond its normal motion. An ankle sprain is a common injury that occurs in sports as basketball and soccer. The deltoid ligament is on the medial side. It is formed of four parts: anterior tibiotalar part, tibionavicular part, tibiocalcaneal part and the posterior tibiotalar. The superficial deltoid arises from the anterior colliculus. The deep deltoid arises form the posterior colliculus and the intercollicular groove. The deltoid ligament is the main stabilizer of the ankle joint during the stance phase. The deltoid ligament is rarely injured by itself and it is usually associated with fractures. There are 3 lateral ligaments of the ankle joint: The anterior talofibular ligament (weakest): origin: 10 mm proximal to the tip of the fibula. Extends from the anterior inferior border of the fibula to the neck of the talus. The posterior talofibular ligament ( strongest): origin from the posterior border of the fibula. Inserts into posterolateral tubercle of the talus Calcaneofibular ligament: origin anterior border of the fibula 1 cm proximal to the distal tip. Inserts into the calcaneus distal to the subtalar joint and deep to the peroneal tendon sheath. The lateral ligaments are the most commonly injured ligaments in the ankle. The ligament of the syndesmosis •Anterior inferior tibiofibular ligament •Interosseous ligament •Posterior inferior tibiofibular ligament The connection of the tibia and fibula is called the syndesmosis. High ankle sprain = syndesmosis injury 5-10%. Injury of the ligaments above the ankle. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC
Views: 69557 nabil ebraheim
Exercises for Ankle Joint Ligament Injury & It's Recovery Period
 
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For the Ankle Joint Ligament Injury to heal completely and in the fastest possible time, it is imperative to do the following exercises, which is shown in the video diligently. In post ankle joint ligament injury, there is substantial swelling and reduced range of motion of the ankle. Learn about the exercises and recovery time for ankle joint ligament injury. Also Read: https://www.epainassist.com/sports-injuries/ankle-injuries/ankle-joint-ligament-injury Follow us: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/Epainassistcom-370683123050810/?ref=hl Twitter: https://twitter.com/ePainAssist G+: https://plus.google.com/+Epainassist Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/in/epainassist
Views: 57880 ePainAssist
Medial Collateral Ligament injury , MCL Injuries - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes injuries associated with the Medial Collateral Ligament – MCL. The Medial Collateral Ligament is one of four major ligaments of the knee (MCL, LCL, PCL & ACL). The Medial Collateral Ligament extend from the medial epicondyle of the femur to below the medial condyle of the tibia. The MCL is a static stabilizer composed of superficial (primary) and deep (secondary) portions that are restraints to valgus stress. Superficial MCL •Primary restraint to valgus stress. •Proximal attachment: posterior aspect of medial femoral condyle. •Distal attachment: metaphyseal region of the tibia about 5 cm distal to the joint lying beneath the pes anserinus. Deep MCL •Secondary restraints to valgus stress. •Inserts directly into edge of tibial plateau and meniscus. •May be separated from the superficial layer by a bursa. The joined tendons of the Sartorius, gracilis, semitendinosus muscles cross on top of the lower part of the MCL. The pes anserine bursa is located anterior to the insertion of the medial collateral ligament to the tibia. The MCL’s primary function is to be a restraint to valgus stress. The MCL is the most commonly injured ligament of the knee. The typical mechanism of injury of the MCL is due to a valgus and external rotation force. A typical blow to the knee usually causes complete rupture of the MCL. Rupture may occur proximally or distally. Tears of the proximal MCL have a greater healing rate. Tears of the distal MCL may not heal well (similar to Stener lesion of the thumb). Associated conditions •ACL tears: injury to ACL compromise up tp 90% of associated injuries. Rupture of the ACL causes anterolateral rotatory instability. The majority of MCL injuries that are associated with ACL injuries are grade III complete rupture, no end point with valgus stress at 30 degree and 0 degree of knee flexion. •Meniscal tears: Up to 5% of isolated MCL injuries are associated with meniscal tears. Not a common injury. Classification of MCL sprains •Grade I: sprain, stretch injury •Grade II: partial tear of the MCL. •Grade III: complete tear of the ligament. No end point with valgus stress at 30 degree of knee flexion. Presentation History: pop sensation Symptoms: pain and tenderness usually higher than the joint line. Physical exam: tenderness along medial aspect of the knee, ecchymosis, knee effusion. Testing for MCL injury •Positive valgus stress test at 30 degree of knee flexion indicated injury to the superficial MCL. •Opening around 1 cm indicated a grade III complete tear of the MCL •Positive valgus stress test at 0 degrees of knee extension indicates posteromedial capsule or cruciate ligament injury in addition to MCL injury (means combined injury). •Always evaluate for other injuries (ACL, PCL or medial meniscal tear). Pellegrini-Steida syndrome •Radiographs are usually normal however may show calcification at the medial femoral site (Pellegrini-Steida syndrome) •Calcification due to chronic MCL deficiency at the medial femoral insertion site. •Pediatric patient with a knee injury and suspected salter fracture should get stress views x-ray to rule out a growth plate injury. •Growth plates are weaker than ligaments (may use MRI instead of stress views). MRI is the study of choice as it identifies the location and extent of the MCL injury. Treatment •NSAIDS. •Rest •Therapy: minor sprain of the MCL require therapy with return to play in about a week. May use a brace if injury is grade II, return to play in about 2-4 weeks. With grade III injury, return to play in about 6-8 weeks. •Surgery: surgery in grade III injuries with multiple ligament injury especially with distal avulsion fracture. If there is chronic instability with opening in full extension, do reconstruction. Additional arthroscopy may be needed to rule out associated injury. In combined MCL and ACL injuries, usually surgery for the ACL is delayed until the MCL heals (up to eight weeks). Use ACL brace. Complications include: stiffness and loss of motion. Laxity is associated with distal MCL injuries. Functional bracing may reduce an MCL injury in football players, particularly interior linemen. Become a friend on facebook: http://www.facebook.com/drebraheim Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/DrEbraheim_UTMC Donate to the University of Toledo Foundation Department of Orthopaedic Surgery Endowed Chair Fund: https://www.utfoundation.org/foundation/home/Give_Online.aspx?sig=29 Background music provided as a free download from YouTube Audio Library. Song Title: Every Step
Views: 140728 nabil ebraheim
Anterior Drawer Test of the Ankle | Chronic Ankle Laxity & Anterior Talofibular Ligament Rupture
 
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DOWNLOAD OUR APP: 📱 iPhone/iPad: https://goo.gl/eUuF7w 🤖 Android: https://goo.gl/3NKzJX GET OUR ASSESSMENT BOOK ▶︎▶︎ http://bit.ly/GETPT ◀︎◀︎ This is not medical advice. The content is intended as educational content for health care professionals and students. If you are a patient, seek care of a health care professional. The anterior drawer test has limited diagnostic ability for chronic ankle laxity but performs well in an acute situation to diagnose ruptures of the anterior talofibular ligament commonly injured after ankle inversion trauma  HELP TRANSLATE THIS VIDEO  If you liked this video, help people in other countries enjoy it too by creating subtitles for it. Spread the love and impact. Here is how to do it: https://youtu.be/b9cKgwnFIAw  SUPPORT US  : http://bit.ly/SPPRTPT  ARTICLES: Croy (2013): https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24175608 Van Dijk (1996): https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9065068 Miller (2016): https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26660862 Visit our Website: http://bit.ly/web_PT Like us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/like_PT Follow on Instagram: http://bit.ly/IG_PT Follow on Twitter: http://bit.ly/Tweet_PT Snapchat: http://bit.ly/Snap_PT
Views: 83546 Physiotutors
Chronic Lateral Ankle Instability - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
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Dr. Ebraheims animated educational video describing the condition of chronic lateral ankle instability Ankle sprain is a common injury that occurs with sports activities and the lateral ligaments are the most commonly injured ligaments in the ankle. Three ligaments on the ankle joint on the lateral side: 1- Anterior talofibular ligament: is the weakest ligament of all three of them, the integrity of this ligament is tested by preforming the anterior drawer test. 2- The posterior talofibular ligament: is the strongest of the three ligaments. 3- Calcaneofibular ligament: injury to this ligament usually occurs after injury to the anterior talofibular ligament, the integrity of this ligament is tested by preforming the talar tilt test. If the patient cannot bear weight after what is suspected ankle sprain, then you need to get an x-ray to check if the patient has a fracture. Acute ankle sprains are usually treated by: • Immobilization • Ice • Physical therapy • Surgery (rare) Sometimes these ligaments do not heal and become incompetent. Incompetence of these ligaments may create chronic lateral ankle instability. You may want to examine the hindfoot for varus malalignment. Occult varus may lead to treatment failure. Check for peroneal muscles and tendon weakness which is a frequent cause of lateral ankle instability. If you find that there is hindfoot varus, you may need to do the coleman block test to differentiate between fixed and flexible hindfoot varus. The treatment will be different. Treatment: The majority of ankle sprains will heal with time and are treated with: • Rest • Physical therapy - Peroneal muscle strengthening with proprioception and range of motion of the ankle. In some cases the patient may not get better and may have: • Mechanical instability or functional instability • Patient may not improve with conservative treatment - Patient may require surgery What type of surgery may be necessary? • Anatomic repair (Brostrom procedure). Direst repair of the attenuated ligament. OR • Anatomis repair (Modified Brostrom procedure). • Direct ligament repair with augmentation using the inferior extensor retinaculum. • A graft can be used if the Brostrom technique fails. For chronic lateral ankle instability, we also need to look for other conditions such as peroneal tendon pathology, fractures, joint lesions, or arthritis. There are a lot of differential diagnosis for this area that can create ankle instability. These are some of the other causes that can create the same symptoms of pain and instability of the lateral ankle. When pain is located posterior to the fibula, you can blame this on peroneal tendon pathology. The peroneal tendons are subjected to excessive repetitive forces causing pain, swelling, and instability of the lateral ankle. Treated by injection or possibly surgery (synovectomy). The superior peroneal retinaculum is usually holding two peroneal tendons behind the fibula. The inferior peroneal retinaculum is not as important as the superior peroneal retinaculum. Superior peroneal retinaculum tear: - Tear may lead to subluxation of the peroneal tendons. - Do physical therapy or reconstruction of the superior peroneal retinaculum. Peroneal tendon subluxation occurs with dorsiflexion and inversion; however it is tested with dorsiflexion and eversion against resistance. Peroneus longus or brevis tendon rupture or tear: - Tear of the peroneus longus tendon may occur at the peroneal tubercle with the Os Peroneum migrationg proximally. - Tears of the peroneus brevis may occur with peroneal tendon subluxation. - In these cases you will do repair or tenodesis of the torn tendon. Lesions inside the joint: - Osteochondral lesion of the talus (OCD): they are 2 types: • Posteromedial • Anterolateral Treatment: • NSAIDS • Physical therapy • Surgical treatment: ankle arthroscopy. - If the OCD lesion is less than 1 cm then you will do excision, curettage, or drilling of the lesion. - Anterolateral Impingement: painful limitation of full range of ankle motion due to asseous (bony) or soft tissue pathology. - Treatment: • physical Therapy • injection • arthroscopic debridement of the impingment - ankle synovitis: you do synovectomy. - Ankle arthritis: ankle arthritis of the ankle joint usually results from prior injury or inflammation to the ankle joint. - It can be diagnosed by an exam or by an x-ray. - We start with conservative treatment, brace, injection, if nothing works do arthrodesis or total ankle surgery if conservative treatment fails. - If there is loose bodies inside the ankle, remove it. - There may be some fractures that cause instability of the ankle, like lateral process fracture of the talus, anterior process fracture of the calcaneus. - Jones fracture or Pseudo- Jones fracture. - The treatment is specific for the type of fracture. - This needs to be diagnosed and treated accordingly. - Osteal coalition: may cause frequent ankle instability.
Views: 72045 nabil ebraheim
Anatomical Landmark of the ATF Ligament
 
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#podiatricsurgery #artofsurgery #drmercado
Views: 3224 TheArtofsurgery
Medial Ankle Sprain
 
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The term sprain signifies injury to the ligaments of the ankle. Ligaments are tough bands of tissue that help connect bones together. A medial ankle sprain occurs when the ankle is stressed in an everted (turned out) and externally rotated (turned away from the body) position. The primary ligament supporting the medial aspect of the ankle is the deltoid ligament, which is comprised of the anterior and posterior tibiotalar ligaments, the tibiocalcaneal ligament, and the tibionavicular ligaments. They typically will have swelling and pain on the outside of the ankle; bruising usually signifies tearing of the tissues. This type of sprain is less common than a lateral ankle sprain.
Views: 18139 Smart PT Pro
Syndesmosis Ligament Tenderness Palpation | Syndesmosis Injury
 
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DOWNLOAD OUR APP: 📱 iPhone/iPad: https://goo.gl/eUuF7w 🤖 Android: https://goo.gl/3NKzJX GET OUR ASSESSMENT BOOK ▶︎▶︎ http://bit.ly/GETPT ◀︎◀︎ This is not medical advice. The content is intended as educational content for health care professionals and students. If you are a patient, seek care of a health care professional. Palpating the ligaments of the ankle syndesmosis for tenderness can help indentify concordant syndesmosis injury after ankle inversion trauma. 🚨 HELP TRANSLATE THIS VIDEO 🚨 If you liked this video, help people in other countries enjoy it too by creating subtitles for it. Spread the love and impact. Here is how to do it: https://youtu.be/b9cKgwnFIAw 👉🏼 SUPPORT US 😊 : http://bit.ly/SPPRTPT 👈🏼 ARTICLES: Sman et et al. (2015): https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24255766 Visit our Website: http://bit.ly/web_PT Like us on Facebook: http://bit.ly/like_PT Follow on Instagram: http://bit.ly/IG_PT Follow on Twitter: http://bit.ly/Tweet_PT Snapchat: http://bit.ly/Snap_PT
Views: 4227 Physiotutors
How to visualise the anterior talofibular ligament on ultrasound
 
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How to visualise the anterior talofibular ligament on ultrasound, a brief tutorial on how to ultrasound the lateral ankle ligaments.
Views: 5208 Stuart Wildman
How to treat an Ankle Inversion Sprain - Kinesiology Taping to stabilise ligaments
 
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http://www.johngibbonsbodymaster.co.uk/courses/ John Gibbons is a sports Osteopath and a lecturer for the 'Bodymaster Method ®' and in this video he is demonstrating how to apply Kinesiology tape for a patient that presents with an Ankle Inversion sprain. Want to learn how to apply Athletic Tape as well as other Physical Therapy CPD Courses then look on http://www.johngibbonsbodymaster.co.uk John is also the Author of the highly successful book and Amazon No 1 best seller, called 'Muscle Energy Techniques, a practical guide for physical therapists'. John has also written 2 more books, one is called 'A Practical Guide to Kinesiology Taping' and this comes with a complimentary DVD and the other book is called; 'Vital Glutes, connecting the gait cycle to pain and dysfunction'. These 2 books are available to buy now through his website http://www.johngibbonsbodymaster.co.uk/books/ or from Amazon http://www.amazon.co.uk John now offers Advanced Training in all aspects of Sports Medicine to already qualified therapists in manual therapy to 'Diploma' Level. You need to have attended all of his Physical Therapy Courses before the diploma is awarded. His venue is based at the idylic venue of Oxford University, home of the first four-minute mile by Roger Bannister.
Views: 962446 John Gibbons
Ankle Palpation
 
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http://www.p2sportscare.com to learn prevention methods. We specialize in sports injuries and getting athletes back to their sports fast (running injuries, shoulder tendonitis, IT Band, Runners Knee, Hip Flexor tightness). We see athletes anywhere from baseball, triathletes, golfers, basketball, cyclist, runners and so on. We provide Active Release Techniques (ART), chiropractic care, strength training and corrective exercises. The Performance Place Sports Care is located in Huntington Beach, CA. 714-502-4243 Ankle impingement by an osseous growth, spur, can be the main source of pain with many biomechanical and functional movements. Anatomically the ankle is composed of three joints: talocrural joint, subtalar joint, and inferior tibiofibular joint. The ankle joint is special in that all surfaces of the joint are covered in articular cartilage, which can be a mechanical disadvantage if injured. Cartilage as a whole does not have neural or vascular supply, therefore any injury to the cartilage will not be able to heal properly. If enough cartilage damage is done to the level of the subchondral bone, an area of vascularity, it is possible that some of the articular cartilage may be healed with fibrocartilage. Although fibrocartilage indicates healing in the ankle joint, it has decreased biomechanical benefits and can lead to impingement. Typically articular cartialge will not induce pain, due to the lack of neural input. However, if pain is felt after the ankle swelling has reduced, it is likely the pain is referred from another source such as an osseous spur. The ankle joint is surrounded by many ligaments that hold all of the boney attachments together. Functionally speaking, the ankle is a joint of mobility and is the key player in determining the functionality for all the other major joints of the body. Athletes who have difficulty moving their ankle through ranges of motion or have pain upon movement can possibly have a restricted ankle joint, but the main cause is due to poor biomechanics from a previous overuse injury and fatiguing of the soft tissue. Among the ligaments found in the ankle, the strongest ligament of the ankle joint is the deltoid ligament, found on the inside. The other three ligaments, anterior and posterior talofibular ligaments, and calcaneofibular ligaments are found laterally and the area of insult with a classic inversion ankle sprain. Once the ankle is malpositioned, the ligaments become lax and unstable in efforts of preventing dysfunctional movement. Ankle sprains are usually caused by intense, repetitive movements applying too much pressure to the muscles and joints. The ankle is found to be most stable in the closed pack position, dorsiflexion, and most injuries are attained with plantar flexion. Running, ice skating, plyometric exercise are all activities with repetitive ankle motion and can lead to injury. When observing the ankle for motion, the patient may experience pain through the ranges of motion, which is a good indicator of an impingement and there is some sort of restriction in the soft tissue or in the joint. To fully diagnose a healed ankle with dyskinesis or pain imaging should also be considered in diagnosis to rule out any osseous fracture, joint degeneration, impingement from an osseous structure, or arthritis in the joint. The best source of imaging for the ankle joint is an arthroscopy. If a sprain is concluded another source of imaging would be a musculoskeletal ultrasound to further evaluate the scar tissue in the soft tissue preventing full range of motion in addition to pain upon exertion. Possible treatments for ankle impingement: - Active Release Technique - Graston - Eccentric rehabilitative exercises - Stretching - RICE (rest, ice, compress, elevate) - Surgery based on the severity of the tear to reattach the muscle tendon - Steroid injections - Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory medications ankle impingement, impingement of ankle, impingement syndrome, ankle pain, pinch in ankle, ankle sprain, sprained ankle, rolled ankle, ankle therapy, ankle treatment, ankle physiotherapy, physiotherapy, chiropractic, sports chiropractor, huntington beach chiropractor, physiotherapist, peroneal tendonitis, atfl, ligament tear, tibialis positerior, tibialis anterior
Views: 38693 Sebastian Gonzales
Anterior Talofibular Ligament Active Release
 
01:03
A soft tissue technique effective for ankle sprains. Learn more at www.zaccupples.com
Views: 2220 Zac Cupples
Two Minutes of Anatomy: Medial Ankle Ligaments
 
02:11
Dr Donald A Ozello DC of Championship Chiropractic in Las Vegas, NV is the author of "Running: Maximize Performance & Minimize Injuries." He can be found on the web at http://www.championshipchiropractic.com/index.htm "Running: Maximize Performance & Minimize Injuries" is available in paperback & ebook. https://www.amazon.com/dp/1493618741/ref=cm_sw_r_tw_dp_x_tfQIyb7X7W0WF Two Minutes of Anatomy is a twice weekly video show. Dr Ozello gives a short anatomy lesson that is beneficial for all levels of education. Dr Donald A Ozello DC wishes you success in life, academics, business & athletics. Work hard, work smart, be healthy & accomplish your goals. ***Medial Ankle Ligaments*** *Collectively known as the Deltoid Ligament *Posterior Tibiotalar Ligament *Tibiocalcaneal Ligament *Tibionavicular Ligament *Anterior TibioTalar Ligament *Prevents excessive eversion of the ankle.
Knee Ligament Injuries: How They Happen! (MCL, LCL, PCL, & ACL Tears)
 
05:08
Knee Stretch Video: https://youtu.be/rCZ4gnN-BrQ Get My Greatest Tips & Posture Info Here: http://madmimi.com/signups/225816/join Thumbnail Image From © Artem Furman / Fotolia ***************************************** The knee has 4 major ligaments that provide stability to it. Due to various factors, including playing sports or having muscle imbalances, we can become hurt and develop knee ligament injuries. These can cause lasting pain and problems that may take a long time to resolve. One ligament that is commonly injured is the anterior cruciate ligament, or the ACL. This ligament checks the forward motion of your tibia, or shinbone, on your femur. You can develop an injury or ACL tears from things such as a direct traumatic impact, having a muscle imbalance over a long period of time, and other things. Another ligament that is less commonly injured is your PCL or posterior cruciate ligament. This ligament is stronger than your ACL and is often injured through a traumatic incident such as a car accident. The PCL helps to resist backwards motion of the tibia on the femur, so if something were to cause the Tibia to move backwards forcefully, this could lead to an injury. The MCL or Medial Collateral Ligament is on the inner part of your knee on the outside. It resists your knee bending inwards. This ligament can be injured through something such as a football tackle on the outer part of your knee, forcing it in. Also, having knock knees can lead to this ligament becoming injured over time. Finally, your LCL ligament can become injured, which is on the outer part of your knee on the outside. This ligament could get injured through a football tackle on the inner part of your knee, forcing your knee out sideways. Being in a bow legged position can also stress this ligament over time. Essentially, there are many ways that knee ligament injuries can happen that are worth knowing about. When you know about the ways in which these injuries occur, you can better protect your body and even take preventative measures. ************************************************** Follow me on Pinterest: www.pinterest.com/fitnessoriented/ Follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/FitnessOriented Follow me on Google+: plus.google.com/+FitnessOriented ***************************************** Intro Music (provided by NCS a.k.a. NoCopyrightSounds): Title: Aero Chord feat. DDARK – Shootin Stars Creators: Aero Chord & vocals by DDARK Link to Song: https://youtu.be/PTF5xgT-pm8 Follow Aero Chord: https://www.youtube.com/user/TheAeroChord https://twitter.com/TheAeroChord https://soundcloud.com/aerochordmusic http://facebook.com/AeroChord Follow DDark: https://www.facebook.com/ddarkonline http://soundcloud.com/ddark http://twitter.com/ddarkonline http://youtube.com/user/DDARKTV Outro Music (provided by NCS): Title: Free Fall Creator: Audioscribe Link To Song: https://youtu.be/8ciZGNmlWgo Follow Audioscribe: https://soundcloud.com/audioscribe http://www.facebook.com/AudioscribeMusic http://twitter.com/AudioScribed https://www.youtube.com/user/AudioscribeMusic Cephelopod - Cephelopod by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1200081 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ Intro & Outro music all made usable by NCS (NoCopyrightSounds) Link to NCS YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_aEa8K-EOJ3D6gOs7HcyNg NCS SoundCloud http://soundcloud.com/nocopyrightsounds Facebook: http://facebook.com/NoCopyrightSounds Google+ http://google.com/+nocopyrightsounds Instagram: http://instagram.com/nocopyrightsounds
Views: 25899 Fitness Oriented
Anatomy and injuries of The Lateral Ankle - Everything You Need To Know - Dr. Nabil Ebraheim
 
03:03
Dr. Ebraheim’s educational animated video describes the anatomy of the lateral ankle, the bony structure, muscles, and nerves, and the injuries of the lateral ankle area. Ligaments around the ankle •Anterior talofibular ligament •Posterior talofibular ligament •Calcaneofibular ligament Peroneal tendons •Peroneus Brevis tendon •Superior & inferior peroneal retinacula •Peroneus longus tendon There are many structures present on the lateral side of the ankle. These structures are often susceptible to injury. Diagnosis of these injuries can be confusing and many of these injuries can be missed. Diagnosis of a sprained ankle may be the wrong diagnosis. Common injuries and conditions around the lateral ankle. 1-Ankle Sprain 2-High ankle sprain (syndesmotic injury). 3-Peroneal tendon subluxation. 4-Rupture of the peroneus longus tendon 5-Peroneal tendonitis 6-Anterior process of the calcaneus fracture. 7-Lateral process of the talus fracture 8-Achilles tendonitis
Views: 46157 nabil ebraheim
Lateral Sprained Ankle Stretches & Exercises - Ask Doctor Jo
 
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Lateral ankle sprains can be very painful and cause your ankle to become unstable. These stretches and exercises should help the healing process. See Doctor Jo’s blog post about this at: http://www.askdoctorjo.com/lateral-sprained-ankle The first stretch will be a calf stretch. Start off with your legs out in front of you. You can bend up the leg you aren’t using towards you in a comfortable position. Keep the leg you want to stretch out in front of you. Take a stretch strap, dog leash, belt, or towel and wrap it around the ball of your foot. Relax your foot, and pull the strap towards you stretching your calf muscle. You should feel the stretch under your leg. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds, and do three of them. Now prop your ankle up on a roll or hang your foot off the bed or table so your heel doesn't touch the floor. Put the band around the ball of your foot for good resistance. First, push your foot down and up. This is called ankle plantarflexion. Next you are going to cross your foot over the foot with the band as seen in the video, and pull your foot inward. This is ankle inversion. Now you want to wrap the band around your other foot. This time you will have resistance pulling out. This is ankle eversion. The next exercise will be standing up. You want to lean against a wall or something sturdy. Place the foot you want to stretch behind you. Make sure to keep your heel down and your toes forward pointing towards the wall. With the other foot in front of you, like you are in a lunge position, bend your knee towards the wall until you feel a stretch through your back leg. Try to keep your back leg as straight as possible. Hold the stretch for 30 seconds, and do it three times. Now is a heel raise off the ground. Stand with your feet about shoulder width apart, come up on your toes as high as you can. Try not to lean forward, but bring your body straight up and slowly come back down. Push off as much as you can so your heel leaves the ground. Start off with ten and work your way up to 20-25. The last exercise will be a balance series. Stand on one foot, but hold onto something sturdy. Try to balance for 30 seconds to a minute. When that becomes easy, just use one finger one each side. Then just one finger for balance, and finally try balancing without holding on at all. Related Videos: Sprained Ankle Treatment with Ankle/Foot AROM: https://youtu.be/UYM-_k_dWZw?list=PLPS8D21t0eO9JGYS958XUh2mkV8Sa2sAq Sprained Ankle - How to Wrap an Ankle Sprain: https://youtu.be/BPbUH4rdKPo?list=PLPS8D21t0eO9JGYS958XUh2mkV8Sa2sAq =========================================== SUBSCRIBE for More Videos: http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=askdoctorjo ======================================= Doctor Jo is a Doctor of Physical Therapy. http://www.AskDoctorJo.com http://www.facebook.com/AskDoctorJo http://www.pinterest.com/AskDoctorJo https://www.instagram.com/AskDoctorJo http://www.twitter.com/AskDoctorJo http://plus.google.com/+AskDoctorJo ======================================= Lateral Sprained Ankle Stretches & Exercises: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3JJayVC0-20 DISCLAIMER: This content (the video, description, links, and comments) is not medical advice or a treatment plan and is intended for general education and demonstration purposes only. This content should not be used to self-diagnose or self-treat any health, medical, or physical condition. Don’t use this content to avoid going to your own healthcare professional or to replace the advice they give you. Consult with your healthcare professional before doing anything contained in this content. You agree to indemnify and hold harmless Ask Doctor Jo, LLC and its officers for any and all losses, injuries, or damages resulting from any and all claims that arise from your use or misuse of this content. Ask Doctor Jo, LLC makes no representations about the accuracy or suitability of this content. Use of this content is at your sole risk.
Views: 101406 AskDoctorJo
Ankle Ligament Repair Surgery with Arthrex Internal Brace - Houston Ankle Surgeon
 
09:04
In this ankle surgery video, Dr Moore demonstrates how the Arthrex Internal Brace and its equipment is designed to reinforce the anterior talofibular ligament after the Modified Brostrom procedure. The steps are also explained in the instructional video http://youtu.be/FNcCY0ilfFw if the surgical video is too graphic. Most foot and ankle specialists will perform a ligament repair surgery like the Modified Brostrom if the patient has had frequent ankle sprains, ankle instability or the quintessential 'weak ankle' or ankle 'giving out'. Tests include the initial x-rays, MRI, and 'anterior drawer sign' at the clinical evaluation pre operatively. The high points of this surgical equipment are the bone anchors that are offered as an absorbable material and insert 'peek' material. The drills are cannulated for ease of use and maintaining position of the portals and hand held taps and drivers are as easy to use as they are intelligently designed for each part of the procedure. Finally, the brace material itself is made of fiber wire at 5 times the standard strength. To see more surgery instruction videos or for more information, log on to http://www.www.MyFootFix.com or our blog at http://www.Dr-Robert-J-Moore-III.com to watch the surgery, listen to patient testimonials, see patient reviews, ask Dr Moore a question, or make an appointment. Stay Healthy and One Step Ahead!
Posterior drawer test for the ankle
 
00:38
This video demonstrates how to perform a posterior drawer test for the ankle. This test helps to rule in a positive posterior talofibular ligament sprain.
Views: 9955 Pat Oneil
KT TAPE  Lateral Ankle sprain
 
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ATFL, lateral ankle sprain or strain, inversion sprain This video is the property of and copy written by ergasiaPT. It may be shared but not duplicated with the intent of monetary gain without the expressed written permission of the publisher.
Views: 528360 ergasia PT
Assesment of a Suspected Lateral Collateral Ligament Injury
 
01:14
These assessment techniques may be used to assess a knee injury where a lateral ligament injury is suspected. For more information visit: https://www.sportsinjuryclinic.net/sport-injuries/knee-pain/acute-knee-injuries/lateral-knee-ligament-sprain
Ankle Surgery and Recovery
 
02:39
Initial Injury: October 12th, 2012 Twisted ankle, tore CFL (Calcaneofibular Ligament) and ATFL (Anterior talofibular ligament) Surgery: January 16th, 2013 First Cast: January 26th, 2013 Stitches out/second cast: January 31st, 2013 (A day early due to me falling in the tub) Boot: February 12th, 2013 Brace: February 24th, 2013 (a few days early) Last Orthopedic Appointment: March 26th, 2013 I made a full recovery from having a modified Broström procedure, though I did eventually re-injure my ankle and am now looking at having another version of the surgery which will include an internal bracing procedure. Please note that this is not typical of recovery, and is necessary for me primarily because I had weak ligaments to begin with and also am rather clutzy. I wish you the best of luck if you are going to go through this procedure, and feel free to comment with any questions, concerns, or general feedback. I will answer what I can, and am always here to provide support for people going through this!
Views: 55601 Sabrina Feltych
Anterior Talofibular Ligament Stress Test
 
01:02
A Test for the ATFL of the Ankle
Views: 28 The Physio Channel
High Ankle Sprain.mov
 
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High Ankle Sprain is an injury to the syndesmotic ligaments of the tibia and fibula. This involves sprain to the anterior and possibly posterior tibial fibular ligaments. It gets the name "high" because the injury and pain is above the ankle joint between the malleolus. The injury is not as common as an inversion sprain but is more common than eversion sprains and often happens in conjunction with an eversion ankle sprain or visa versa. High ankle sprains typically do not have much swelling. High ankle sprains also typically take much longer to rehab than either inversion or eversion sprains because with every step at toe-off and the foot in extreme dorsiflexion the malleolus separate slightly. As a result each step newly sprains the ligaments. The mechanism of injury involves an outward twisting of the foot and ankle with the foot in extreme (closed pack position) dorsiflexion. This often involves getting pulled down from behind (horse collar tackled) or someone else falling on the back of the lower leg with the foot planted and in extreme dorsiflexion. Pain may not be felt just at the ankle but may be felt all the way up the leg. It is very common to limit extreme dorsiflexion with an immobilization boot for as much as 4-6 weeks.
Views: 2612 Brian Glotzbach
Explanation injury Atlético Madrid star Arda Turan in ankle
 
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Explanation injury Atlético Madrid star Arda Turan Type of injury: simple ankle sprain. Explain the injury: Sprained ankle is one of the most important causes ankle pain as a torsion strain or tear in the ligaments of the ankle It usually occurs sprained foot because of a particular incident involving deviation or movement strong curvature of the foot with the foot bearing body weight in the sense to get critical movement of the foot without natural tendency, especially on uneven surfaces with weight bearing. And foot sprain is damage to the tissue or tear in the connective tissue (such as cartilage and ligaments) in one or more of the joints of the foot. The back side of the foot consists of 7 bones known as carpal bones in the middle of the foot and consists of 5 long bones known as metatarsals. Each finger is composed of several small bones called phalanges. . Works to stick the tissue bones joints together and made up of strong connective tissue that wraps around the ends of the bone and cartilage located between any two bones help to mitigate the impact of a collision with the other during the greatness activity. When there is excessive forces caused expansion joints of the foot injury occurs the joint. This may involve cartilage damage or tear in the connective tissue and Bhada happen sprains. There are two types of sprains, internal and external, and the most common is the face of the bottom of the foot to the inside, where that is suffering from a sprained ankle Leading to break outside ligaments of the ankle The picture shows the types of distortions present in the ankle: What anterior talofibular ligament? It is part of the Lateral collateral ligament of ankle joint or lateral collateral ligament ankle consists of parents (Front) anterior talofibular ligament (Rear) posterior talofibular ligament (Calcaneus) calcaneofibular ligament Is one of the collateral ligaments in the ankle and foot prevented from sliding forward in relation to reed leg. Is the most common ligaments ankle ligament injury. Signs and symptoms of infection: - Little pain in ankle - Little or no loss of stability of the ankle - Little swelling and swelling in the ankle - Some stiffness in the ankle with discomfort in walking or jogging Treatment of infection: - Comfort ankle and lack of movement - Use of ice and put it on the ankle during the first 48 hours - Use Albandj to pressure on the joint and reduce puffiness - Raising the foot for the purpose of reducing the swelling and bleeding in the ankle - May be prescribed doctor Points ibuprofen for the purpose of reducing the pain - Description rehabilitation program The duration of treatment: That the injury of a simple kind any slight tear in ankle ligament Therefore, the period of absence will be 1 to 3 weeks Diagnosed with Atlético Madrid star Arda Turan Arda Turan wounded Baloltoa in the lateral collateral ligament of the ankle, especially in the back of it posterior talofibular ligament And the expected absence of 10 days
Views: 455 Komira Mhracha
Physical Therapy After Ankle Sprain
 
12:25
Physical Therapy After Ankle Sprain An ankle sprain is a common injury and usually results when the ankle is twisted, or turned in (inverted). The term sprain signifies injury to the soft tissues, usually the ligaments, of the ankle. This guide will help you understand: how an ankle sprain occurs how the condition is diagnosed what can be done to treat a sprain Anatomy What part of the ankle is involved? Ligaments are tough bands of tissue that help connect bones together. Three ligaments make up the lateral ligament complex on the side of the ankle farthest from the other ankle. They are the anterior talofibular ligament (ATFL), the calcaneofibular ligament (CFL), and the posterior talofibular ligament (PTFL). The common inversion injury to the ankle usually involves Two ligaments, the ATFL and CFL. Normally, the ATFL keeps the ankle from sliding forward, and the CFL keeps the ankle from rolling inward on its side. Ankle Ligaments Causes Why do I have this problem? A ligament is made up of multiple strands of connective tissue, similar to a nylon rope. A sprain results in stretching or tearing of the ligaments. Minor sprains only stretch the ligament. A tear may be either a complete tear of all the strands of the ligament or a partial tear of only some of the strands. The ligament is weakened by the injury; how much it is weakened depends on the degree of the sprain.
Views: 141 World Top Headlines
ankle assessment
 
04:36
ATH 254 Prevention & Care of Atheltic Injuries: Assessing lower leg and ankle. History, Observation, Palpation (bones, bony prominences, ligaments, muscles, etc.), Special Tests (ROM: dorsiflexion/plantarflexion, inversion/eversion, Tests: thompson - achilles rupture, anterior drawer - anterior talofibular ligament, talar tilt - calcaneofibular ligament)
Views: 52651 Andrew Holzwarth
Inner Ankle Pain Instructional - Huntington Beach
 
02:51
http://www.p2sportscare.com to learn prevention methods. We specialize in sports injuries and getting athletes back to their sports fast (running injuries, shoulder tendonitis, IT Band, Runners Knee, Hip Flexor tightness). We see athletes anywhere from baseball, triathletes, golfers, basketball, cyclist, runners and so on. We provide Active Release Techniques (ART), chiropractic care, strength training and corrective exercises. The Performance Place Sports Care is located in Huntington Beach, CA. 714-502-4243 Ankle impingement by an osseous growth, spur, can be the main source of pain with many biomechanical and functional movements. Anatomically the ankle is composed of three joints: talocrural joint, subtalar joint, and inferior tibiofibular joint. The ankle joint is special in that all surfaces of the joint are covered in articular cartilage, which can be a mechanical disadvantage if injured. Cartilage as a whole does not have neural or vascular supply, therefore any injury to the cartilage will not be able to heal properly. If enough cartilage damage is done to the level of the subchondral bone, an area of vascularity, it is possible that some of the articular cartilage may be healed with fibrocartilage. Although fibrocartilage indicates healing in the ankle joint, it has decreased biomechanical benefits and can lead to impingement. Typically articular cartialge will not induce pain, due to the lack of neural input. However, if pain is felt after the ankle swelling has reduced, it is likely the pain is referred from another source such as an osseous spur. The ankle joint is surrounded by many ligaments that hold all of the boney attachments together. Functionally speaking, the ankle is a joint of mobility and is the key player in determining the functionality for all the other major joints of the body. Athletes who have difficulty moving their ankle through ranges of motion or have pain upon movement can possibly have a restricted ankle joint, but the main cause is due to poor biomechanics from a previous overuse injury and fatiguing of the soft tissue. Among the ligaments found in the ankle, the strongest ligament of the ankle joint is the deltoid ligament, found on the inside. The other three ligaments, anterior and posterior talofibular ligaments, and calcaneofibular ligaments are found laterally and the area of insult with a classic inversion ankle sprain. Once the ankle is malpositioned, the ligaments become lax and unstable in efforts of preventing dysfunctional movement. Ankle sprains are usually caused by intense, repetitive movements applying too much pressure to the muscles and joints. The ankle is found to be most stable in the closed pack position, dorsiflexion, and most injuries are attained with plantar flexion. Running, ice skating, plyometric exercise are all activities with repetitive ankle motion and can lead to injury. When observing the ankle for motion, the patient may experience pain through the ranges of motion, which is a good indicator of an impingement and there is some sort of restriction in the soft tissue or in the joint. To fully diagnose a healed ankle with dyskinesis or pain imaging should also be considered in diagnosis to rule out any osseous fracture, joint degeneration, impingement from an osseous structure, or arthritis in the joint. The best source of imaging for the ankle joint is an arthroscopy. If a sprain is concluded another source of imaging would be a musculoskeletal ultrasound to further evaluate the scar tissue in the soft tissue preventing full range of motion in addition to pain upon exertion. Possible treatments for ankle impingement: - Active Release Technique - Graston - Eccentric rehabilitative exercises - Stretching - RICE (rest, ice, compress, elevate) - Surgery based on the severity of the tear to reattach the muscle tendon - Steroid injections - Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory medications ankle impingement, impingement of ankle, impingement syndrome, ankle pain, pinch in ankle, ankle sprain, sprained ankle, rolled ankle, ankle therapy, ankle treatment, ankle physiotherapy, physiotherapy, chiropractic, sports chiropractor, huntington beach chiropractor, physiotherapist, peroneal tendonitis, atfl, ligament tear, tibialis positerior, tibialis anterior
Views: 43888 Sebastian Gonzales
LIGAMENTS OF THE KNEE
 
04:04
The knee is the largest joint in the human body. It is a compound joint. Not only is it where the femur, or thigh bone, meets the tibia, or shin bone – at the tibiofemoral joint, but it is also where the femur meets the patella, or kneecap – at the patellofemoral joint. There are several ligaments around the knee joint and these are crucial because they limit movements and stabilize the joint. Ligaments are durable bands of fibrous tissue that connect joints and strengthen them. There are two main pairs of ligaments in the knee – the cruciate ligaments, which are inside your knee joint, and the collateral ligaments, which run on either side of the knee. The cruciate ligaments can be seen through the intercondylar notch of the femur. There’s the anterior cruciate ligament, or ACL, and the posterior cruciate ligament, or PCL, which stabilize the knee. The ACL prevents the tibia from being pushed forward relative to the femur, while the PCL prevents it from being pushed backwards relative to the femur. Now for the collateral ligaments – there’s a medial collateral ligament and a lateral collateral ligament. Medial means at the middle, while lateral means on the side. Hence, the medial collateral ligament is found on the inner side of the knee, running from the femur to the tibia. The lateral collateral ligament is found on the outer side of the knee, however, it runs from the femur to the fibula! Note that the medial collateral ligament is significantly wider than the lateral collateral ligament. Together, the medial and lateral collateral ligaments resist sideways movements of the bones relative to one another. Looking back inside the intercondylar notch, we can see the transverse ligament – otherwise called the anterior meniscomeniscal ligament. This ligament connects the anterior lateral meniscus to the anterior medial meniscus. This ligament is important during knee extension, since it prevents the anterior horns of the menisci from coming forward, which would cause the condyles of the femur and tibia to put pressure on them. A ligament discovered in 2013 is the anterolateral ligament, or ALL. It originates at the femur and inserts into the tibia. It is thought that it might control internal tibial rotation. Here we have the ligament of Wrisberg, also called the posterior meniscofemoral ligament. This ligament attaches to the posterior lateral meniscus and crosses behind the PCL to attach to the medial condyle of the femur. Now I’d like to bring your attention to a structure that some call a tendon, and some call a ligament. As a reminder, the difference between ligaments and tendons is that ligaments connect bones to bones, while tendons connect bones to muscles. Here we have the patellar tendon… which some people call the patellar ligament. The patellar tendon connects the patella (or kneecap) to the tibia. Since these are two bones, shouldn’t it be a ligament? Well, this structure is really connecting the quadriceps muscle to the tibia. The patellar tendon is part of a more extensive mechanism, which includes the tibia, the patellar tendon, the patella, the quadriceps tendon, and the quadriceps muscle. Together, these structures allow you to straighten your knee. As a side note, the patella is what is known as a floating sesamoid bone. A sesamoid is a bone embedded in a tendon. To close off, I just want to bring your attention to a couple of other structures visible in this model. The medial and lateral menisci are composed of connective tissue with extensive collagen fibers. They protect the ends of the bones from rubbing against each other. Similarly to the collateral ligaments, the medial one is on the inner side of your knee and the lateral one is on the outer side of your knee. We can also see the articular cartilage on this model. This smooth, white tissue covers the ends of bones where they converge at joints, minimizing friction and allowing bones to glide over each other. As you get older, the articular cartilage and the menisci wear down, exposing underlying bone. This changes the load distribution and biomechanics of your knee and causes pain and inflammation as your bones grind together. 3D model modified from https://www.turbosquid.com/FullPreview/Index.cfm/ID/1123337
Views: 241 Neural Academy
Types Of Ligament Injuries And The Ways To Prevent Them - Manipal Hospital
 
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There are four important ligaments in the knee joint, one in the front and back called Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACM) and Posterior Cruciate Ligament (PCM). The side supporting ligaments are Medial Collateral Ligament (MCL) located on the inside and Lateral Collateral Ligament (LCL) on the outside. The most common injuries are ACL injuries due to twisting, while playing sports like football, badminton etc. or due to road accidents. To prevent ligament injuries during sporting activities, it is important to start with adequate warm-ups to heat the muscles, wear the adequate and appropriate protective gear, wear the right footwear and also cool down after playing by doing some stretching exercises. It is important to scale the activity level gradually to minimize occurrence injuries. The MCL injuries usually occur when there is a blow to the inside of the knee. These can be tackled without surgery. There are 3 grades of MCL injuries. Most of the first and second grade injuries can be treated by non-operative management like using braces for about six weeks. It is also important to carry out RICE treatment: Rest, Icing, Compression and Elevation, which is a common treatment for all ligament injuries. Certain kinds of MCL injuries, such as grade 3 injury in a sportsperson, and multi-ligament injuries may require surgical intervention. Best Hospital in India: Manipal Hospitals is one of the top multi speciality hospital in India located at all major cities like Bangalore, Vijayawada, Visakhapatnam, Goa, Salem, Jaipur, Mangalore. Provides world class 24/7 Emergency services. Our top surgeons are expertise in offering best treatment for Heart, Brain, Cancer, Eye, Kidney, Joint replacement surgery & all major surgeries at affordable cost. Health Check up packages are also available. To know more visit our website : https://www.manipalhospitals.com/ Get Connected Here: ================== Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ManipalHospitalsIndia Google+: https://plus.google.com/111550660990613118698 Twitter: https://twitter.com/ManipalHealth Pinterest: https://in.pinterest.com/manipalhospital Linkedin: https://www.linkedin.com/company/manipal-hospital Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/manipalhospitals/ Foursquare: https://foursquare.com/manipalhealth Alexa: http://www.alexa.com/siteinfo/manipalhospitals.com Blog: https://www.manipalhospitals.com/blog/
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KIN 461 Grade 3 ATFL Sprain (Alexandra Liutec's Group)
 
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References: Ardèvol, J., Bolíbar, I., Belda, V., & Argilaga, S. (2002). Treatment of complete rupture of the lateral ligaments of the ankle: A randomized clinical trial comparing cast immobilization with functional treatment. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 10(6), 371-377. doi:10.1007/s00167-002-0308-9 Biber, R., Bail, H. J. (2014). Akute Bandverletzung am oberen sprunggelenk. Op-journal, 30(2), 92-97. BlittleMcNilsen. (2009, January 18). Super Mario Bros. Music – Underwater [Video File]. Retrieved from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zhZdVeBe_m8 Brukner, P., & Khan, K. (2012). Clinical Sports Medicine (4th ed.). Sydney: McGraw-Hill. Chaudhry, H., Simunovic, N., Petrisor, B. (2015) Cochraine in COOR®: surgical versus conservative treatment for acute injuries of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle in adults (Review). Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research, 473(1), 17-22. DrGlassDPM (2012, August 18). Ankle Sprain Injury Explained. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_u5w856Yjvg Flanagan, A. (2015). Rory McIlroy reveals extent of ankle injury. mirror. Retrieved 21 November 2016, from http://www.mirror.co.uk/sport/golf/rory-mcilroy-reveals-extent-ankle-6207172 Golanó, P., Vega, J., Leeuw, d., P.A.J, Malagelada, F., Manzanares, M. C., Götzens, V., & Dijk, v., C.N. (2010). Anatomy of the ankle ligaments: A pictorial essay. Knee Surgery Sports Traumatology Arthroscopy, 18(5), 557-569. doi:10.1007/s00167-010-1100-x Kerkoffs, G., Handoll, H., de Bie, R., Rowe, B., Struijs, P. (2007). Surgical versus conservative treatment for acute injuries of the lateral ligament complex of the ankle in adults. Cochrane Library. doi: 10.1002/14651858.CD000380.pub2 Kinetic Health. (2012). Ankle Sprains or Inversion Sprains. Retrieved from: http://kinetichealth.ca/ankle-sprains-or-inversion-sprains/ Lynch, S. (2002). Assessment of the injured ankle in the athlete. Journal of Athletic Training, 37(4), 406-412. Lynch, S. A., Renstrom, F. H. (1999) Treatment of acute lateral ankle ligament rupture in the athlete. Sports Medicine, 27(1), 61-71. Mattacola, C. G., Dwyer, M. K. (2002). Rehabilitation of the ankle after acute sprain or chronic instability. Journal of Athletic Training, 37(4), 413-429. Nova Rose. (2010, December 28). An Hour of Jeopardy Think Music [Video File]. Retrieved from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rTyN-vvFIkE Prado, M. P., Mendes, A. A. M., Amodia, D. T., Camanho, G. L., Smyth, N. A., Fernandes, T. D. (2014). A comparative, prospective, and randomized study of two conservative treatment protocols for First-episode lateral ankle ligament injuries. Foot & Ankle International, 35(3), 201-206. SportMedBC. (2016). Ankle Sprains (Soccer). Retrieved from: https://sportmedbc.com/article/ankle-sprains-soccer Takao, M., Miyamoto, W., Matsui, K., Sasahara, J., Matsushita, T. (2011) Functional treatment after surgical repair for acute lateral ligament disruption of the ankle in athletes. American Journal of Sports Medicine, 40(2), 447-451. White, W. J., McCollum, G. A., Calder, J. D. F. (2016). Return to sport following acute lateral ligament repair of the ankle in the professional athletes. Knee Surgery, Sports Traumatology, Arthroscopy, 24(4), 1124-1129. Yeung, M.S., Chan, K.M., So, C.H., Yuan, W.Y. (1994). An epidemiological survey on ankle sprain. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 28, 112-116. doi: 10.1136/bjsm.28.2.112 Table of Contents: 00:00 - Marker 00:33 - Marker 00:39 - Marker 02:13 - Marker 02:40 - Marker 03:06 - Marker 03:50 - Marker 04:56 - Marker 05:10 - Marker 05:59 - Marker 06:01 - Marker 06:12 - Marker 06:38 - Marker 07:24 - Marker 07:47 - Marker 09:32 - Marker
Anterior talofibular ligament and  Anterior Drawer test
 
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Testing of the anterior talofibular ligament using the Anterior Drawer test on a cadaver dissection
Views: 98 Cindy Gill
High Ankle - Distal Tibiofibular Ligament Taping - SPRT
 
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Here is a tape job designed for return to activity after a high ankle sprain or light overuse pain of the distal tibiofibular ligament or syndesmosis. We use a base of kinesiology tape with an SPRT strip overtop to give some extra support to the distal ankle.