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Factors Affecting the Rate of the Reaction - Chemical Kinetics
 
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This chemistry video tutorial discusses five factors affecting the rate of a reaction. This includes the nature of the reactants, concentration, surface area, temperature, and the use of a catalyst. This tutorial is part of the chemical kinetics series. New Chemistry Video Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bka20Q9TN6M&t=25s&list=PL0o_zxa4K1BWziAvOKdqsMFSB_MyyLAqS&index=1 Access to Premium Videos: https://www.patreon.com/MathScienceTutor Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/MathScienceTutoring/
16.1 Reaction mechanism, order of reaction and rate-determining step [HL IB Chemistry]
 
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Rate = k [product of the reactants in the rate determining step] but it could be more complex - see the vid. Make sure that when you "add up" the mechanism it equals your initial given equation. Was the stair that Dr Atkinson demised on his personal "rate determining step"?
Views: 34818 Richard Thornley
7.1 Rate of reactions and factors affecting rate of reaction (Chemical Kinetics)
 
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This video tells you what is the rate of reaction and how it is effected by change of concentration and pressure of reactants, temperature and catalyst.
Calculating the Forward Rate
 
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This video shows how to calculate the Forward Rate using yields from zero-coupon bonds. A comprehensive example is provided along with a formula to show how the Forward Rate is computed based on zero-coupon yields. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 71921 Edspira
Signal-to-Noise Ratio
 
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Definition of the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and simple computations with it. More instructional engineering videos can be found at http://www.engineeringvideos.org. This video is licensed under the Creative Commons BY-SA license http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/us/.
Views: 176755 Darryl Morrell
Introduction to Limiting Reactant and Excess Reactant
 
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Limiting reactant is also called limiting reagent. The limiting reactant or limiting reagent is the first reactant to get used up in a chemical reaction. Once the limiting reactant or limiting reagent gets used up, the reaction has to stop and cannot continue. After the limiting reactant or limiting reagent is used up and the reaction stops, there is extra of the other reactants left over. Those are called the excess reactants. In this video, we'll first learn about limiting reactant and limiting reagent by comparing chemical reactions to cooking recipes. We'll look at how to calculate limiting reactant and limiting reagent using cooking ingredients, and then looking at an actual stoichiometry problem,
Views: 1026984 Tyler DeWitt
Chemical Kinetics Rate Laws – Chemistry Review – Order of Reaction & Equations
 
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This general chemistry study guide video lecture tutorial provides an overview of chemical kinetics. It contains plenty of examples, practice problems, and conceptual questions to help you to master the course. This video is especially helpful to those taking AP chemistry in high school or general chemistry in college. Here is a list of topics: 1. How to calculate the rate of the reaction using the change in concentration and time 2. Determining the order of a reactant and the overall order of the reaction using the method of initial rates. 3. How to determine the rate equation or rate law expression 4. Calculating the rate constant K and the units of K 5. Understanding the difference between the first order, second order, and zero order reaction. 6. Equations and formulas for zero order, first, and second order reactions 7. Half Life Formula, Initial Concentration of A and Rate constant K 8. Factors affecting reaction rate – concentration, temperature, and catalyst 9. Relationship between the rate of the reaction and the concentration 10. Rate constant K, temperature, catalyst, activation energy and potential energy diagrams 11. Forward activation energy vs reverse activation energy 12. Arrhenius Equation 13. Half Life Problems and Half Life Method 14. Collision frequency, steric factor, and frequency factor 15. Reaction Mechanism – Slow Step – Rate Determining Step 16. How To Find the Intermediate and Catalyst in a Reaction Mechanism
Computer Performance: Relative Performance, CPU Time, Clock Cycle, Clock Rate
 
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If you found this video helpful you can support this channel through Venmo @letterq with 42 cents :)
Views: 64872 Q Liu
Exponential Growth
 
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Paul Andersen explains how populations experience exponential. He begins by address the major players; N (population size) and r (growth rate). He models population growth in rabbits through four generations. He then shows you how to use a spreadsheet and then algebra to predict future populations. Intro Music Atribution Title: I4dsong_loop_main.wav Artist: CosmicD Link to sound: http://www.freesound.org/people/CosmicD/sounds/72556/ Creative Commons Atribution License All images are either Public Domain or Creative Commons Attribution Licenses: Nevit. English: White Rabbit, 2011. Own work. https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Rabbit_nevit.svg.
Views: 184342 Bozeman Science
The Normal Distribution and the 68-95-99.7 Rule
 
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Thanks to all of you who support me on Patreon. You da real mvps! $1 per month helps!! :) https://www.patreon.com/patrickjmt !! The Normal Distribution and the 68-95-99.7 Rule. In this video, I talk about the normal distribution and what percentage of observed values fall within either 1, 2, or 3 standard deviations from the mean. One specific example is discussed. For more free math video, visit http://PatrickJMT.com
Views: 647183 patrickJMT
Steady-State Approximation
 
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Using rate constant information for a two step reaction, use steady-state approximations to determine an overall rate expression for the product formation. Made by faculty at the University of Colorado Boulder, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering. Check out our Kinetics/Reactor Design playlists: https://www.youtube.com/user/LearnChemE/playlists?view=50&flow=list&shelf_id=7 Are you using a textbook? Check out our website for videos organized by textbook chapters: http://www.learncheme.com/screencasts/kinetics-reactor-design
Views: 48427 LearnChemE
Math Antics - Ratios And Rates
 
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Learn More at mathantics.com Visit http://www.mathantics.com for more Free math videos and additional subscription based content!
Views: 1446817 mathantics
Cardiac Output, Stroke volume, EDV, ESV, Ejection Fraction
 
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Cardiac Physiology Basics. This video and other related images/videos (in HD) are available for instant download licensing here: https://www.alilamedicalmedia.com/-/galleries/images-videos-by-medical-specialties/cardiology-and-vascular-diseases ©Alila Medical Media. All rights reserved. Voice by: Sue Stern. Support us on Patreon and get FREE downloads and other great rewards: patreon.com/AlilaMedicalMedia CARDIAC OUTPUT is the amount of blood pumped by each ventricle in one minute. It is the product of STROKE VOLUME – the amount of blood pumped in one heartbeat, and HEART RATE – the number of beats in one minute. An INcrease in either stroke volume or heart rate results in INcreased cardiac output, and vice versa. For example, during physical exercises, the heart beats faster to put out more blood in response to higher demand of the body. It is noteworthy that the ventricles do NOT eject ALL the blood they contain in one beat. In a typical example, a ventricle is filled with about 100ml of blood at the end of its load, but only 60ml is ejected during contraction. This corresponds to an EJECTION fraction of 60%. The 100ml is the end-DIASTOLIC volume, or EDV. The 40ml that remains in the ventricle after contraction is the end-SYSTOLIC volume, or ESV. The stroke volume equals EDV minus ESV, and is dependent on 3 factors: contractility, preload, and afterload. Contractility refers to the force of the contraction of the heart muscle. The more forceful the contraction, the more blood it ejects. PRELOAD is RELATED to the end-diastolic volume. Preload, by definition, is the degree of STRETCH of cardiac myocytes at the end of ventricular filling, but since this parameter is not readily measurable in patients, EDV is used instead. This is because the stretch level of the wall of a ventricle INcreases as it’s filled with more and more blood; just like a balloon - the more air it contains, the more stretched it is. According to the Frank-Starling mechanism, the greater the stretch, the greater the force of contraction. In the balloon analogy, the more inflated the balloon, the more forceful it releases air when deflated. AFTERLOAD, on the other hand, is the RESISTANCE that the ventricle must overcome to eject blood. Afterload includes 2 major components: - Vascular pressure: The pressure in the left ventricle must be GREATER than the systemic pressure for the aortic valve to open. Similarly, the pressure in the right ventricle must exceed pulmonary pressure to open the pulmonary valve. In hypertension for example, higher vascular pressures make it more difficult for the valves to open, resulting in a REDUCED amount of ejected blood. - Damage to the valves, such as stenosis, also presents higher resistance and leads to lower blood output. All images/videos by Alila Medical Media are for information purposes ONLY and are NOT intended to replace professional medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition.
Views: 178211 Alila Medical Media
Stoichiometry: Limiting reagent | Chemical reactions and stoichiometry | Chemistry | Khan Academy
 
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Stoichiometry problem where we find the limiting reagent and calculate grams of product formed. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-reactions-stoichiome/limiting-reagent-stoichiometry/v/limiting-reactant-example-problem-1?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/science/chemistry/chemical-reactions-stoichiome/stoichiometry-ideal/v/stoichiometry-example-problem-2?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=chemistry Chemistry on Khan Academy: Did you know that everything is made out of chemicals? Chemistry is the study of matter: its composition, properties, and reactivity. This material roughly covers a first-year high school or college course, and a good understanding of algebra is helpful. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy is a nonprofit with a mission to provide a free, world-class education for anyone, anywhere. We believe learners of all ages should have unlimited access to free educational content they can master at their own pace. We use intelligent software, deep data analytics and intuitive user interfaces to help students and teachers around the world. Our resources cover preschool through early college education, including math, biology, chemistry, physics, economics, finance, history, grammar and more. We offer free personalized SAT test prep in partnership with the test developer, the College Board. Khan Academy has been translated into dozens of languages, and 100 million people use our platform worldwide every year. For more information, visit www.khanacademy.org, join us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter at @khanacademy. And remember, you can learn anything. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Chemistry channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCyEot66LrwWFEMONvrIBh3A?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 1625901 Khan Academy
Economic Growth explained (explainity® explainer video)
 
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The economy is expected to grow steadily. Politics, industry and trade wish for economic growth. But how can economic growth be measured and might the economy eventually fully grown sometime? Our third clip in cooperation with Deutsche Welle explains "Economic Growth". Script download: www.explainity.com/education-project/transskripte/ ------- This explainer video was produced by explainity GmbH Homepage: www.explainity.com E-Mail: [email protected] This explanatory film was produced and published for private, non-commercial use and may be used free of charge in this context for private purposes without consultation or written authorization. Please note, however, that neither the content nor the graphics of this explanatory film may be altered in any way. Please always give explainity as the source when using the film, and if you publish it on the internet, provide a reference to www.explainity.com. For commercial use or use for training purposes, such as projection of the film at training events (e.g. projection of the film as a teaching aid in school or in adult education), a licence is required. Further information on this subject will be found here: https://www.explainity.com/education-project If you are interested in an own explainity explainer video, visit our website www.explainity.com and contact us. We are looking forward to your inquiry.
Views: 107536 explainitychannel
Simple Interest: finding Principal, Rate or Time 141-27
 
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Using the formula for simple interest to find the principal, the rate or the time. This video is provided by the Learning Assistance Center of Howard Community College. For more math videos and exercises, go to HCCMathHelp.com.
Views: 234136 HCCMathHelp
IRR (Internal Rate of Return)
 
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This video explains the concept of IRR (the internal rate of return) and illustrates how to calculate the IRR via an example. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 600294 Edspira
The Rate Law
 
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036 - The Rate Law Paul Andersen explains how the rate law can be used to determined the speed of a reaction over time. Zeroth-order, first-order and second-order reactions are described as well as the overall rate law of a reaction. The rate of a reaction can be determined experimentally. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: "File:Ammonia-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed October 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Ammonia-3D-vdW.png. File:Crystal Violet in Aqueous Solution.jpg, n.d. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Crystal_Violet_in_aqueous_solution.jpg. "File:Nitric-oxide-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed October 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nitric-oxide-3D-vdW.png. "File:Nitrogen Dioxide at Different Temperatures.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed October 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nitrogen_dioxide_at_different_temperatures.jpg. "File:Nitrogen-dioxide-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed October 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nitrogen-dioxide-3D-vdW.png. "File:Oxygen Molecule.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed October 19, 2013. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Oxygen_molecule.png. File:Spektrofotometri.jpg, n.d. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Spektrofotometri.jpg. Izmaelt. Slovenčina: Príprava Oxidu Dusičitého z Medi a Kyseliny Dusičnej. Fotené Na Slovenskej Technickej Univerzite., October 27, 2010. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nitrogen_dioxide.jpg.
Views: 232881 Bozeman Science
Commercial Real Estate - NOI, Cap Rate, & Price
 
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A quick description of Net Operating Income, Capitalization Rate, and Price - What they are, how they interact with each other, how to use them, etc. If I have made any mistakes, or omitted what seems like important relevant info then please message me or leave a comment! http://relevantproperties.com
Views: 131642 InvestRelevant
Chemistry - Chemical Kinetics (15 of 30) Finding Rate Law & Rate Constant, k
 
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Visit http://ilectureonline.com for more math and science lectures! In this video I will determine the rate law and the rate constant, k.
Views: 45981 Michel van Biezen
Introduction to present value | Interest and debt | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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A choice between money now and money later. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/interest-tutorial/present-value/v/present-value-2?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/interest-tutorial/present-value/v/time-value-of-money?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: If you gladly pay for a hamburger on Tuesday for a hamburger today, is it equivalent to paying for it today? A reasonable argument can be made that most everything in finance really boils down to "present value". So pay attention to this tutorial. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 749082 Khan Academy
How to find Interest & Principal payments on a Loan in Excel
 
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More help: https://www.teachexcel.com Excel Forum: https://www.teachexcel.com/talk/microsoft-office?src=yt How to find the interest and principal payments on a fixed rate loan in excel. This tutorial will walk you through using the PPMT() and IPMT() functions in excel in order to find out how much of a monthly payment on a loan actually goes to pay off the loan amount and how much is just an interest payment. More free excel stuff such as macros, tutorials, articles, etc. go to: TeachExcel.com
Views: 440020 TeachExcel
Labor Markets and Minimum Wage: Crash Course Economics #28
 
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How much should you get paid for your job? Well, that depends on a lot of factors. Your skill set, the demand for the skills you have, and what other people are getting paid around you all factor in. In a lot of ways, labor markets work on supply and demand, just like many of the markets we talk about in Crash Course Econ. But, again, there aren't a lot of pure, true markets in the world. There are all kinds of oddities and regulations that change the way labor markets work. One common (and kind of controversial one) is the minimum wage. The minimum wage has potential upsides and downsides, and we'll take a look at the various arguments for an against it. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 476812 CrashCourse
🔋 Battery amp-hour, watt-hour and C rating tutorial
 
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A guide to battery capacity measurement including amp-hours, watt-hours, C ratings and more. Website: http://www.afrotechmods.com/ The Amp Hour podcast: http://www.theamphour.com/
Views: 720927 Afrotechmods
Cost-Benefit Discounting
 
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This video is a part of Conservation Strategy Fund's collection of environmental economic lessons and was made possible thanks to the support of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Marcia Brady Tucker Foundation. This series is for individuals who want to learn - or review - the basic economics of conservation. In this video, you will learn why you discount the future in cost-benefit analysis. Concepts include discount rates, weighted average discount rates, economic opportunity costs of capital and financial vs. economic discount rates. To follow this series, subscribe to our YouTube channel. For more information on these and other trainings from Conservation Strategy Fund, check out: http://www.conservation-strategy.org/ For copyright information on all sound effects, see http://www.conservation-strategy.org/en/page/csf-economic-video-lessons-sound-references
VA Disability Ratings: What they mean + VA Math
 
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Use our VA Disability Calculator to calculate your rating: https://cck-law.com/veterans-law/resource-center/ Click Show More to see the math involved in the Combined Ratings example. THE VIDEO: In this week’s video, Robert Chisholm sits down with CCK’s Managing Attorney, Jonathan Greene, to talk VA disability ratings – how they’re determined for individual disabilities and how to calculate your own Combined Rating. THE EXAMPLE: A veteran has Post Traumatic Stress rated 50%, tinnitus rated 10%, and bilateral hearing loss rated 10%. One might assume that that veteran’s combined rating would be 70% because 50 + 10 + 10 = 70, but this is not the case. Instead, the rating is calculated like this: Look at the highest rating (PTS at 50%) first. If the veteran is 50% disabled, then (according to VA) he/she is 50% NON-disabled. 100% - 50% disabled = 50% NON-disabled So, according to VA’s rules, the next rating (tinnitus at 10%) only comes out of the remaining 50% that is NON-disabled. 10% of 50% = 5% [OR .1 x .5 = .05] We then add that 5% to the 50% to get 55% disabled. The remaining, NON-disabled percentage than becomes 45%. 5% + 50% = 55% disabled 100% - 55% = 45% NON-disabled The next rating (bilateral hearing loss at 10%) only comes out of the remaining 45%. 10% of 45% = 4.5% [OR .1 x .45 = .045] We then add 4.5% to 55%, getting 59.5%. Since there are no more disabilities to combine, we can round to the nearest multiple of 10 to find the veteran’s final combined rating. Because it is greater than 55%, we round up to 59.5% (if it was 52% or 54.5%, for example, we would round down) and the veteran will receive compensation at the 60% level. 4.5% + 55% = 59.5% ≈ 60% disabled MORE ABOUT VA'S DISABILITY RATING SCHEDULE: https://cck-law.com/news/veterans-affairs-disability-rating/
The Equilibrium Constant
 
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065 - The Equilibrium Constant In this video Paul Andersen defines the equilibrium constant (K) and explains how it can be calculated in various reversible reactions. The equilibrium constant is a ratio of the concentration of the products to the concentration of the reactants. If the K value is less than one the reaction will move to the left and if the K value is greater than one the reaction will move to the right. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: "File:Lightning Hits Tree.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed January 2, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Lightning_hits_tree.jpg. "File:Nitric-Oxide-3D-vdW.png." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed January 2, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Nitric-oxide-3D-vdW.png. "File:Phosgene Poster ww2.jpg." Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia. Accessed January 2, 2014. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Phosgene_poster_ww2.jpg. "Reversible Reactions." PhET. Accessed January 2, 2014. http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/reversible-reactions. "Reversible Reactions." PhET. Accessed January 2, 2014. http://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/reversible-reactions.
Views: 363130 Bozeman Science
NEET Medical Online Video on Chemical Kinetics - Rate Law: Class 12th Chemistry
 
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This Aakash iTutor video talks about the rate Laws of chemical reactions. The teacher explains the method of determining the rate law of an elementary reaction by taking a look at the stoichiometric coefficient. The order of a reaction can also be predicted on the basis of Rate Laws. Moving on, Complex Reactions are reactions which take more than one step to complete. Writing the rate law for a complex reaction involves analyzing the step wise mechanism of the reaction. The slower step is the rate determining step, and it is used to write the rate law for the complex reaction.
Math Antics - Finding A Percent Of A Number
 
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Learn More at mathantics.com Visit http://www.mathantics.com for more Free math videos and additional subscription based content!
Views: 2154422 mathantics
Converting Units With Conversion Factors
 
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This video focuses on converting units of measurement with conversion factors. It explains how to convert units of length, time, capacity, volume, area, mass, speed / velocity, and density which is useful for students taking chemistry, math, or physics. This video on converting units of measurement is also useful for kids in 4th grade, 5th grade, and 6th grade. This tutorial contains plenty of examples and practice problems. Metric System Made Easy! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQMUHIyd-0g Epic Music Mix: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qeljbZhx9bY Significant Figures: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l2yuDvwYq5g Intro To Scientific Notation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_BtzXojuM1o How To Win The Tic Tac Toe Game! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LRlSJzBCPMM Here is a list of topics: 1. Common Conversion Factors of Length, Time, & Capacity / Volume 2. How to convert centimeters to meters - cm to m 3. Converting milliliters to Liters - mL to L 4. kilometers to centimeters - km to cm 5. Milliliters to Cubic Meters - mL to m^3 6. One step vs two step conversion practice problems 7. Multi-step dimensional analysis problems 8. meters per second to kilometers per hour - m/s to km/h 9. miles per hour to meters per second - mph to m/s or mi/hr to m/s 10. grams per milliliter to kilograms per cubic meter - g/ml to kg/m^3 11. how to convert square feet to square yards - ft^2 to yd^2 12. converting square centimeters to square meters - cm^2 to m^2 13. cubic yards to cubic feet - yd^3 to ft^3
First Order Elimination Rate Constant and Half-life | A closer look - Lect 11
 
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A video overview of first order elimination rate constant and its relationship to half-life. View the rest of my pharmacology videos below: (1) Pharmacokinetics & ADME: http://youtu.be/CMRZqdrkCZw DRUG ABSORPTION Videos: (2) Drug Absorption Overview: http://youtu.be/eya9jR3v7i8 (3) Bioavailability: http://youtu.be/rv2Rpdi7OHM DRUG DISTRIBUTION Videos: (4) Drug Distribution Overview: http://youtu.be/DH2WGUd7MBs (5) Volume of Distribution: http://youtu.be/B63sqUfvFQQ ------------------ DRUG METABOLISM Videos: (6) First Pass Metabolism: http://youtu.be/5AB8WkCbz4k (7) Phase I Metabolism: http://youtu.be/GGLddVpVg9M (8) Phase II Metabolism: http://youtu.be/iIWAUo05GFE (9) First Order and Zero Order Kinetics: http://youtu.be/XEotDfKhNTw (10) Drug Half-life: http://youtu.be/eTqPsqnbwoc (11) First-order elimination rate constant and half-life-details: http://youtu.be/De9999Jj-5Q ------------------------------------------ DRUG ELIMINATION / EXCRETION (12) Drug Clearance: http://youtu.be/csywV3MYHDg (13) Renal Excretion of Drugs: http://youtu.be/8c3gqI6R-Vw (14) Ion Trapping: [not yet posted] (15) Dosage Regimens: [not yet posted] --------------------------------------------------------------------- Factors That Affect Drug Metabolism: (16) Enzyme Induction: http://youtu.be/Dtbkc8F_ff0 (17) Competitive Inhibition Overview: http://youtu.be/iNIxMuHuL3w (18) Competitive Inhibition of Statins: http://youtu.be/Lt1-mjMFniE (19) Acetaminophen toxicity (Clinical Correlate): [Not yet posted] (20) Pharmacogenomics Overview: http://youtu.be/3vZxbX5P9TU (21) Slow Acetylators - Pharmacogenomics: [not yet posted] Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org/v/B5Ex/
Views: 65045 Areo Saffarzadeh
Introduction to Beta in Corporate Finance
 
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This video shows what beta is in the context of Corporate Finance. Beta is the percentage change in an asset's return, given a 1% change in the return of the market portfolio (an index such as the S&P 500 is commonly used to proxy for the market portfolio. Beta is important because it measures the amount of systematic risk an asset has. Because unsystematic risk (firm-specific risk) can be diversified away, the systematic risk of an asset is what determines the risk premium demanded by investors for holding the asset. Thus, beta can be used to calculate the cost of a firm's equity capital (for example, with the Capital Asset Pricing Model). Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 42631 Edspira
Odds Ratio & Relative Risk Calculation & Definition, Probability & Odds
 
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ERRATA: At about the 3:00 mark the slide says "10,00" when it is really supposed to say "10,000." I added a pop up box to fix it. Thanks to Mehdi Hedjazi for pointing this typo out The terms odds and probability are used interchangeably in everyday life. However, in the setting of Biostats they are two different things. Generally speaking they both represent how likely something is, but they are calculated differently and used in different situations. Probability is essentially the same things as percentage. You are comparing the number of occurrences of a certain outcome to the number of total events measured. Probability ranges between zero and one. Odds is a ratio of the likelihood of an event happening compared to the likelihood of an event not happening. Odds can be zero or any positive number (not just values between 0 and 1). So the probability of rolling a 4 on one attempt with one six faced die is 1_6. The odds of rolling a 4 are 1_5. Here is another example. If 13 people of a 60 person sample have lung cancer the probability of a person in that group having lung cancer is 13_60 and the odds of a person in that group having lung cancer is 13_ 47. When we are talking about common events the difference between odds and probability is high. For example, flipping a coin one time gives you pretty different results. You have 1_1 odds of getting head and 1_2 probability of getting heads. However, as an event gets more and more rare the difference between odds and probability gets very small. Pretend there is a drawing with one winner and 10,000 people entered. The odds of winning are 1_9,999 (0.0001) and the probability of winning is 1_10,000 (0.0001). In this case, odds and probability are essentially identical. The difference between odds and probability is important because Relative Risk is calculated with probability and Odds Ratio is calculated with odds. Relative Risk (RR) is a ratio of probabilities or put another way it is one probability divided by another. Odds Ratio (OR) is a ratio or proportion of odds. I just remember that odds ratio is a ratio of odds and probability isn't a ratio of odds (AKA it is the other option). Relative Risk = Probability _ Probability Odds Ratio = Odds _ Odds Now that you have a general idea of what odds ratio and relative risk are you need to know when to use them. They don't always just ask you to calculate one or the other. Sometimes questions on Step 1 also require you to figure out which type of calculation is needed based on the situation. In clinical trials and cohort studies we use relative risk to compare the incidence of health outcomes between groups of differing exposure or treatment. For case-control trials we use odds ratio to compare the "incidence" of past exposures or treatments. Cohort Studies (and clinical trials) = Relative Risk Case-Control studies = Odds Ratio I remember this by thinking about a group of pirates (group = cohort) all saying "aRRrrr!". That reminds you that cohort studies use RR and the "other one" uses OR. Now that we understand the research setting for each term we can redefine RR & OR. I should note that I think memorizing these definitions is unnecessary because if you understand the simpler definitions you should be able to create these based on the scenario presented in the question. An RR or OR of 1 means there is no difference between the two groups being compared with respect to what you are measuring. In this case the treatment or risk factor being study has no effect on the rate of outcome development. Similarly, an OR or RR of 2 means whatever you are measuring is two times as likely to occur in the group being studied when compared with the control group. 0.5 means it is half as likely and so on. Later in the chapter we will cover how confidence intervals are applied to RR & OR. Now that you have finished this video you should check out the next video in the Biostats & Epidemiology section which covers Number Needed to Harm & Attributable Risk (http:__www.stomponstep1.com_number-needed-to-treat-absolute-risk-reduction-attributable-risk-number-needed-to-harm_).
Views: 110262 Stomp On Step 1
Kinetics: Chemistry's Demolition Derby - Crash Course Chemistry #32
 
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You can directly support Crash Course at http://www.subbable.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Also, if you can afford to pay a little every month, it really helps us to continue producing great content. Have you ever been to a Demolition Derby? Then you have an idea of how molecular collisions happen. In this episode, Hank talks about collisions between molecules and atoms, activation energy, writing rate laws, equilibrium expressions, reactions mechanics, and rate-determining steps. And funnel cakes are AWESOME! ***** AND NOW, A SUBBABLE MESSAGE! ***** "Jane McLauchlan, thank you for decreasing worldsuck. I love you!" - Charlotte Thornton -- Table of Contents Collisions Between Molecules and Atoms 0:00 Activation Energy 1:32 Writing Rate Laws 3:28 Rate Laws and Equilibrium Expressions 5:30 Reaction Mechanisms 8:06 Rate-Determining Steps 7:04 -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 562415 CrashCourse
Exponential Growth / Population Growth Problem.
 
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Thanks to all of you who support me on Patreon. You da real mvps! $1 per month helps!! :) https://www.patreon.com/patrickjmt !! In this video, we know that a population is growing exponentially; we also know there were 200 bacteria 3 days ago and 1000 bacteria yesterday. How many bacteria will be present tomorrow?
Views: 335406 patrickJMT
Duty cycle, frequency and pulse width--an explanation
 
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These terms are often confused or used interchangeably, when they are actually three different ways of measuring an electrical signal.
Views: 155038 Justin Miller
Human Population Growth - Crash Course Ecology #3
 
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If being alive on Earth were a contest, humans would win it hands down. We're like the Michael Phelps of being alive, but with 250,000 times more gold medals. Today Hank is here to tell us the specifics of why and how human population growth has happened over the past hundred and fifty years or so, and how those specifics relate to ecology. Like CrashCourse? http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Follow CrashCourse! http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Table of Contents 1) R vs. K Selection Theory 01:41:1 2) Causes of Exponential Human Growth 03:24 3) Human Carrying Capacity 03:30:2 4) Ecological Footprints 06:40:1 5) Causes for Decline in Human Growth Rate 08:10:1 Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 834447 CrashCourse
Calculating Safety Stock: Protecting Against Stock Outs
 
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The following video explains how to calculate safety stock in order to avoid the high costs of inventory shortages and stock-outs. The video explains inventory replenishment times, daily consumption, safety stock thresholds and levels, and your company’s own time to market in terms of delivery. A graph is provided that clearly shows what the reorder point should be and what the safety stock levels should be. A working example is provided where a company tracks a number of inventory replenishment times, their own daily consumption levels, the safety stock amount they need to cover during these consumption periods and then finally, your company’s delivery times for finished goods to your customer base. http://www.driveyoursuccess.com Video provides four steps to calculate safety stock Additional Sources: http://www.driveyoursuccess.com/2011/08/determining-safety-stock-its-impact-on-inventory-holding-costs.html This article outlines four steps to safety stock management
Views: 118099 Ian Johnson
Diminishing Marginal Returns- Micro 3.1
 
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I explain the idea of fixed resources and the law of diminishing marginal returns. I also discuss how to calculate marginal product and identify the three stages of returs: increasing, decreasing, and negative returns. For more econ stuff, visit my website www.ACDCEcon.com Get the Ultimate Review Packet http://www.acdcecon.com/#!review-packet/czji High school version of this video- https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_TQ62MwzSrY Next Video- Economies of Scale https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JdCgu1sOPDo Econmovies- https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1oDmcs0xTD9Aig5cP8_R1gzq-mQHgcAH Twitter (#askclifford) https://twitter.com/acdcleadership?lang=en By the way, I had some songs from West Side Story in my head while I was filming.
Views: 502365 Jacob Clifford
Determining Net Present Value (NPV)  - Real Estate Investment Tips
 
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Stay knowledgeable by subscribing! http://bit.ly/iLiveInTheBayArea Visit my site for even more information: http://www.iLiveInTheBayArea.com Like me on Facebook: http://www.fb.com/iLiveInTheBayArea As I discussed in my "Investing Terms Part 2" video, Net Present Value -- or NPV -- means to convert all the future cash flows into today's dollars. Which even for me is still a bit of a confusing way to understand it. For a quick recap on how we calculate this figure, let's look at a simple example. If you buy a property for $1m, and make $100k/year every year for 5 years, then SELL the property for $1m again at the end of the 5th year, your internal rate of return will be 10%. To explain this simply, you've made 10% on your money every year for the last 5 years since you bought and sold the property with no profit. But what is your Net Present Value? Well, you're NPV can only be determined by you as an investor. As an investor, you need to have an idea of what kind of return you are ok with making. For example, if you place your money in a savings account, you know that tomorrow, next year and even in 10 years your money is going to be there. Even if the bank closes, so long as you have under $250,000 in your account the federal government will guarantee that your money is safe. Because of the safety factor the bank in return pays you a very, very small return rate. Usually half or a quarter of a percent. Because of the lack of risk and the extreme safety of your money, you're NPV is under 1%. Safety is your goal. If you willing to go into a decaying market where unemployment is extremely high and the populating is shrinking, you may be demanding a higher NPV. If you're looking into investing in a strong market where there is low unemployment and the population is growing, you may demand a lower NPV. Let's look at a real life example in my market area. San Francisco is currently -- and almost always -- considered one of the top investment locations in the US along with New York, LA and other large metro areas. Because many people view it as a stable investment, they're willing to accept less of a return, typically in the 3-6% range. Right outside of San Francisco are some pretty stable locations which aren't considered as great as San Francisco but are fairly close to investment value. In locations such as Berkeley and Downtown Oakland your average return range may be 5-9%. Once you start venturing out further and further away from the main business hub the rates start to increase depending on a variety of factors. For example, if you take a location with a higher than normal crime rate and higher unemployment you will likely see return rates of over 15%. However, if you take another location that is the same distance from San Francisco but is a high income area with low unemployment you will likely see return rates in the range of 8-12%. If you go to a city where there is only one major employer who is about to go bankrupt and could very likely close their factory doors, then return rates would be much much higher than 15% due to the extreme risk. Which again brings us to the point of you as an investor knowing what your desired return rate is. Let's go back to the same $1m property example. Let's say you are interested in the particular property, but because you think some tenants might leave you don't want to make 10%, you instead demand 12%. Using the same $1M property example above, if you plan on selling this property in 5 years for the same $1m you purchased it for, you would have to pay $72,000 LESS than $1m to attain your 12% Internal rate of return. But presume there's a bidding war, and you feel this property is under priced just to draw in your offer. Instead of 10%, you're perfectly comfortable with 8%. Again you using our example you could pay about $80,000 MORE than the $1m list price and still make your 8% return rate. Determining your NPV isn't the easiest thing in the world. Nor is it the easiest concept to understand. However, don't confuse the fact that it is a bit tricky to understand with the fact that it is one of the most sought after methods by investors in determining what a property is worth to them...now that's good to know.
Understanding Confidence Intervals: Statistics Help
 
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This short video gives an explanation of the concept of confidence intervals, with helpful diagrams and examples. Find out more on Statistics Learning Centre: http://statslc.com or to see more of our videos: https://wp.me/p24HeL-u6
Views: 694248 Dr Nic's Maths and Stats
TAKE-OFF Speeds V1, Vr, V2! Explained by "CAPTAIN" Joe
 
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INSTAGRAM FLYWITHCAPTAINJOE: https://goo.gl/TToDlg MY WEBSITE: https://goo.gl/KGTSWK NEW FACEBOOK PAGE: https://goo.gl/heUKGb ▼▼My FLIGHT-KIT I highly recommend for you guys▼▼ MY HEADSET: https://amzn.to/2yncd9d MY SUNGLASSES: https://amzn.to/2Rx1mCm MY PILOT BAG: https://amzn.to/2zYcqSh Company iPad: https://amzn.to/2ynxOhT ▼▼The VIDEO EQUIPMENT I use in my studio and outdoors▼▼ MY CAMERA: https://amzn.to/2yov6sj LIGHTING: https://amzn.to/2zXH2DB IN-FLIGHT RECORDINGS: https://amzn.to/2ynmrGH Today´s topic will be airplane take-off speeds, V1, VR and V2. I´m sure many of you have heard about these speeds. I will explainin more detail what is so important about V1. By the book V1 is defined as „The speed beyond which the takeoff should no longer be aborted“. Meaning that in case you experience any trouble with your plane before reaching V1, the classic example would be an engine failure, you would immediately abort your take-off and would apply all necessary matters to bring the aircraft to a stop. Vr or better know as Rotate is defined as, “The speed at which the pilot begins to apply control inputs to cause the aircraft nose to pitch up, after which it will leave the ground“. Easiest way to memorize Vr is, the point where the nose wheel leaves the ground vortexes are created at the wing tips which „rotate“ behind the aircraft. V2 is defined as the Takeoff safety speed. The speed at which the aircraft may safely be climbed with one engine inoperative. I will go through speeds and hope my explanation solves a few question about these mysterious speeds. Make sure to check out my WEBSITE for more aviation related questions and answer at https://goo.gl/KGTSWK And please follow me on INSTAGRAM: https://goo.gl/TToDlg All the best your "Captain" Joe The great outdoor videos were provided by theDoubleH63 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KbAQpvBo1qg&index=8&list=PLj3heGzcJWd ERR0MmeSnWf16_9lt6J27 PilotSanderHD https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l3wTcz8gJjw&t=337s&index=9&list=PLj3heGzcJWd-ERR0MmeSnWf16_9lt6J27 SimonLowe https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9KhZwsYtNDE&t=32s And the thumbnail picture was provided by Chris and Simon @muc_aviationphotography on instagram! https://goo.gl/lXLhci Please make sure to check out their great channels, and thanks again boys for your help :) Equipment I use: Camera: http://amzn.to/2nEHPDM Microphone: http://amzn.to/2nff2oF Lights: http://amzn.to/2nEPGkU
Views: 1800466 Captain Joe
factors affecting sn1 nucleophilic substitution reactions
 
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What factors affect nucleophilic substitution unimolecular Sn1 reactions? I.1) Effect of the Leaving Group I.2) Effect of the Nucleophile I.3) Effect of Carbocation and Carbocation rearrangements I.4) Substituent effects Subsribe to Chemistry_Net: http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCRHkadk8a3zbg7RsKYwcuHw?view_as=public Relevant Video: https://youtu.be/9sgCMxFtvHk These factors are explained in this video-tutorial and their effects to the rate of reactions and the structure of the products is presented. I.1) Effect of the Leaving Group The mechanism of the SN1 reactions - derived from experimental facts - shows that the rate-determining step is the dissociation of the alkyl halide (or alcohol) to form a carbocation. The ease with which the leaving group dissociates from the carbon affects the rate of SN1 reactions. The weaker the base, the less tightly it is bonded to the carbon and the easier it is to break the bond. As a result, an alkyl iodide is the most reactive and an alkyl fluoride is the least reactive of the alkyl halides, as substrates, in SN1 reactions. Iodide ion is less basic than fluoride ion therefore a better leaving group. The relative reactivities of alkyl halides as substrates in SN1 reactions is shown below: RI RBr RCl RF reactivity decreases from left to right I.2) Effect of the Nucleophile The nucleophile reacts with the carbocation. The carbocation is formed in the rate-determining step and affects the rate of the SN1 reaction. Stable carbocations -tertiary- are formed faster than weaker carbocations -primary- and react with the nucleophile to form products. The nucleophile though comes into play after the rate-determining step. Therefore, the reactivity of the nucleophile has no effect on the rate of an SN1. In most SN1 reactions, the solvent is the nucleophile. These reactions are called solvolysis. The nucleophiles that are used more often in SN1 reactions are “soft nucleophiles” with the following characteristics: large, neutral, not-basic, like to attack saturated carbon. As examples can be given: I-, R3P, RS-, CH3O- I.3) Effect of Carbocation and Carbocation rearrangements Stable carbocations are formed faster than less stable since the energy requirement ΔG is lower. Therefore, tertiary bromides are expected to react faster in an SN1 type reaction than primary bromides since when ionize give tertiary cations that are more stable and are produced faster than primary. https://youtu.be/zycKmXW3n-c I.4) Substituent effects Compounds of the formula ZCH2X, where Z = RO, RS, or R2N undergo SN1 reactions very rapidly, because of the increased resonance in the carbocation. These groups have an unshared pair on an atom directly attached to the positive carbon, which stabilizes the carbocation. The field effects of these groups would be expected to decrease SN1 rates, so the resonance effect is far more important. When Z in ZCH2X is RCO, HCO, ROCO, NH2CO, NC, or F3C, SN1 rates are decreased compared to CH3X, owing to the electron-withdrawing field. References R. Bruckner, “Advanced Organic Chemistry – Reaction Mechanisms”, 2nd Edition, Elsevier, 2002 (http://www.amazon.com/Advanced-Organic-Chemistry-Reaction-Mechanisms /dp/0121381102#reader_0121381102) M.B. Smith & J. March “March’s Advanced Organic Chemistry”, 6th Edition, Wiley-Interscience, 2007 http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-0470462590.html M.B. Smith & J. March “March’s Advanced Organic Chemistry”, 6th Edition, Wiley-Interscience, 2007
Views: 1997 Chemistry_Net
Annuities : Annuity Due , Finding Future Value
 
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Thanks to all of you who support me on Patreon. You da real mvps! $1 per month helps!! :) https://www.patreon.com/patrickjmt !! Annuities : Annuity Due , Finding Future Value. In this video, we invest a fixed amount at regular intervals in an annuity due. We then find the future value of the annuity.
Views: 528832 patrickJMT
Derivation of Enzyme Kinetics for Noncompetitive Inhibition
 
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Derives the rate expression for an enzyme reaction with a substrate to make a product where an inhibitor competes for the substrate and it also competes for the enzyme-substrate complex to form an inactive complex; this is noncompetitive inhibition (or mixed inhibition). The rate determining step approximation is used to determine the rate expression. Check out our screencasts on other types of inhibition: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4xAk5aclnUj26ubv86C34HL703ZD_bsF Made by faculty at the University of Colorado Boulder, Department of Chemical & Biological Engineering. Check out our Kinetics/Reactor Design playlists: https://www.youtube.com/user/LearnChemE/playlists?view=50&flow=list&shelf_id=7 Check out our website for screencasts organized by popular textbooks: http://www.learncheme.com/screencasts/kinetics-reactor-design
Views: 10714 LearnChemE
Calculating Infusion Rates
 
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This video tutorial for Nursing students outlines how to calculate infusion rates for nurses. The technique explained here is the 'halving method'.
Views: 383849 ellsmdx
GLOMERULAR FILTRATION made easy!!
 
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A step-by-step tutorial about glomerular filtration. Includes an overview of glomerular filtration rate (GFR), discussing how Starling forces (hydrostatic and oncotic pressure) lead to filtration being favoured. FUNCTION OF THE NEPHRON made easy!! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8UVlXX-9x7Q Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCC_8OQncpInqJPFKqyzjW_A Like ^_^ facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/biomedsessions 0:47 Ultrafiltration Barrier 2:36 Starling Forces (hydrostatic & oncotic pressure) 4:41 Glomerular Filtration Rate (GFR)
Views: 335486 Biomed Sessions
Which way will the Equilibrium Shift? (Le Chatelier's Principle)
 
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Check me out: http://www.chemistnate.com
Views: 415434 chemistNATE
Productivity and Growth: Crash Course Economics #6
 
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Why are some countries rich? Why are some countries poor? In the end it comes down to Productivity. This week on Crash Course Econ, Adriene and Jacob investigate just why some economies are more productive than others, and what happens when an economy is mor productive. We'll look at how things like per capita GDP translate to the lifestyle of normal people. And, there's a mystery. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Jan Schmid, Simun Niclasen, Robert Kunz, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Eric Kitchen, Christian, Beatrice Jin, Anna-Ester Volozh, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Stephen Lawless, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Jessica Wode, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, SR Foxley, Christy Huddleston, Steve Marshall, Chris Peters Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 831448 CrashCourse

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