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GCSE Science Physics (9-1) Required Practical 8: Ripple Tank
 
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Find my revision workbooks here: https://www.freesciencelessons.co.uk/workbooks/shop/ In this video, we look at how to use a ripple tank to determine the wavelength, frequency and speed of water waves. This is a required practical so it is essential that you learn the details. Deliberate Thought by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/?keywords=deliberate+thought Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Views: 158165 Freesciencelessons
7 wave investigations to try with a ripple tank
 
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In this video, John takes us through 7 investigations to try with a ripple tank. Using a bar with motor and various barriers, you can demonstrate different wave forms as well as reflection, refraction, diffraction and interference. Visit our shop to purchase a ripple tank for your classroom: https://www.edutrade.co.za/subjects/physical-science/education-kits/ripple-tank-set.html _____________________ RESOURCES & LINKS: "How to set up a Ripple Tank" (video) https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lcA9pGVnFt0 _____________________ ►Subscribe to our Channel: https://bit.ly/2Gq0qNI Find us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/LasecEducationSA/ Find us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/LasecEducation Read more on our blog: https://www.edutrade.co.za/blog.html #RippleTank #RippleTankInvestigations #WaveProperties #ScienceExperiments #Diffraction #Refraction #WaveInvestigations
Views: 48054 Lasec Education
GCSE Physics - Water Waves - Shallow to Deep Water
 
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This tutorial is about how waves can speed up or slow down when then enter a material with a different optical density, or when water waves enter regions of different depths. This change of velocity can cause the waves to change direction - this is called REFRACTION. Subscribe for more physics tutorials like this: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-Physics-Ninja Water waves will refract when then move from shallow to deep water causing them to speed up. As a result, their wavelength will increase and the refracted ray will 'SPEED AWAY' from the normal line. Remember that the wavefronts are always at 90 degrees to the ray. Use 'RNAR' to work through the steps: 1. Ray (incident ray) 2. Normal (line perpendicular to surface where the ray enters) 3. Angles (label the angle of incident and angle of refraction) 4. Use the refraction rule "SPEED AWAY" to determine which direction the refracted ray will bend. Quick question: During refraction, the wavelength and the speed of the wave changes. What does NOT change about the wave? (Answer... the frequency of the wave does not change) So why do waves get faster in deeper water? The answer is a bit complex, but here is an explanation posted at the Illinois Department of Physics: 1. For a shallow fluid, the motion of the fluid is mostly side-to-side. 2. In order to accumulate more fluid in one place (to make the crest of the wave), each little bit of fluid must travel a little farther than it would have to in deeper water. 3. When a wave passes, the bits of fluid (if you could watch one at a time) travel in ellipses. For shallow water, the ellipses are stretched out horizontally, and in very deep water, they are very nearly circular. 4. So for a wave of the same height (top to bottom of the ellipse), the bits of water must travel farther in the shallow tray than the deep tray. 5. Because the waves of the same height in shallow and deep water exert the same pressure differences due to gravity to get the water moving (although the motion is different due to the fact that the bottom is there), similar forces push and pull on the water. 6. To get the water moving farther and faster with the same force takes a longer time for each push, and hence a slower speed for the wave which travels in the shallow water. " (From https://van.physics.illinois.edu/qa/listing.php?id=2223) For more physics flashcards and tutorials visit https://gcsephysicsninja.com/product/waves-flashcards/
Views: 40964 GCSE Physics Ninja
Waves in a ripple tank: AQA 9-1 Physics required practical
 
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How to set up the ripple tank and how to calculate wavelength of waves
Views: 6169 Mr Haider
Refraction in Water by Ripple Tank
 
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Physics_p-9-10-shm-24.mp4
Views: 4623 Sabaq. Pk
Wavespeed - GCSE Science Required Practical
 
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Mr Rees shows you how to measure wavespeed on water and string.
Views: 12340 Malmesbury Science
Properties of Waves - Exploring Wave Motion (1/5)
 
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Andrew Norton uses a ripple tank to demonstrate some basic features of waves. (Part 1 of 5) Playlist link - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFE829A78F461BD20 Transcript link - http://media-podcast.open.ac.uk/feeds/fsc-exploring-wave-motion/transcript/fsc03.01.pdf Open Learn related content: Physics: https://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/physics-and-astronomy/physics Light: Wave-particle duality: https://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/physics-and-astronomy/physics/light-wave-particle-duality What's so exciting about gravitational waves being discovered? : https://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/physics-and-astronomy/physics/whats-so-exciting-about-gravitational-waves-being-discovered Study Q64 BSc (Hons) Natural Sciences (Physics) http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/qualifications/q64-phy The Open University is the world’s leading provider of flexible, high-quality online degrees and distance learning, serving students across the globe with highly respected degree qualifications, and the triple-accredited MBA. The OU teaches through its own unique method of distance learning, called ‘supported open learning’ and you do not need any formal qualifications to study with us, just commitment and a desire to find out what you are capable of. Free learning from The Open University http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ For more like this subscribe to the Open University channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXsH4hSV_kEdAOsupMMm4Qw Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ouopenlearn/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/OUFreeLearning #OpenUniversity #Physics
Ripples in a pond
 
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Everyone knows that when you drop a small object in calm water you can see circles of ripples moving outward from the point where the object hit the water. But did you know that these ripples represent two different types of waves with significant differences in properties? These are the tiny capillary waves, which exhibit "anomalous dispersion", and the larger gravity waves, which exhibit "normal dispersion".
Views: 16517 strath007
Apertures and Diffraction - Exploring Wave Motion (3/5)
 
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Andrew Norton shows what happens when waves pass through apertures of different sizes. (Part 3 of 5) Playlist link - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFE829A78F461BD20 Transcript link - http://media-podcast.open.ac.uk/feeds/fsc-exploring-wave-motion/transcript/fsc03.03.pdf Open Learn related content: Physics: https://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/physics-and-astronomy/physics Light: Wave-particle duality: https://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/physics-and-astronomy/physics/light-wave-particle-duality What's so exciting about gravitational waves being discovered? : https://www.open.edu/openlearn/science-maths-technology/science/physics-and-astronomy/physics/whats-so-exciting-about-gravitational-waves-being-discovered Study Q64 BSc (Hons) Natural Sciences (Physics) http://www.open.ac.uk/courses/qualifications/q64-phy The Open University is the world’s leading provider of flexible, high-quality online degrees and distance learning, serving students across the globe with highly respected degree qualifications, and the triple-accredited MBA. The OU teaches through its own unique method of distance learning, called ‘supported open learning’ and you do not need any formal qualifications to study with us, just commitment and a desire to find out what you are capable of. Free learning from The Open University http://www.open.edu/openlearn/ For more like this subscribe to the Open University channel https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXsH4hSV_kEdAOsupMMm4Qw Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ouopenlearn/ Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/OUFreeLearning #OpenUniversity #Physics
90 ft. Vertical Spike Wave in Slow Mo
 
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Gav and Dan go to an ocean simulator to film a wave that does not occur anywhere in nature in glorious 4K slow motion. Do we hit Dan in the face with it? Watch to find out. Spoiler: Yes.
Views: 8108926 The Slow Mo Guys
Q 03....L1 (Water Waves) .... Ch 5 Waves IGCSE past papers ..... Refraction
 
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IGCSE Extended Cambridge CIE 0625 Physics questions and mark scheme answers
STEM Experiment: Ripple Tank
 
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Today we experiment with the Ripple Tank to demonstrate wave behaviors like reflection, refraction, deflection, and interference. Ripple Tank: goo.gl/uePzq8 --- 2018 Product Catalog - goo.gl/Wk2ysK Visit us - http://american-scientific.com/ Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/AmericanScientific/ Twitter - http://twitter.com/AmSciTeam Instagram - http://www.instagram.com/amsciteam/ Music by: Nicolai Heidlas
Speed of a wave through water demonstrated in a ripple tank
 
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Using a ripple tank to determine the speed of a wave through water. This is a required practical in most GCSE Physics programs. The frequency of the wave is measured. This is best done with a slow-motion video setting on a phone camera. The number of waves passing an object are counted and the number of waves per second is calculated. In this case 9 waves per second or 9Hz. Then using the same camera footage the length of the wave is determined, in this case, it is 3cm To calculate the wave speed or velocity the frequency is multiplied by the wavelength. Velocity = frequency x wavelength Wavelength = 3cm or 0.03m 9 x 0.03 = 0.27m/s Philip M Russell Ltd Web: http://www.hemelprivatetuition.co.uk
Views: 53 Philip Russell
GCSE Physics required practical activity: Waves the ripple tank
 
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GCSE Physics required practical activity: Waves
Views: 10908 kamal Wafi
Ripple Tank Refraction
 
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Views: 2248 MustangPhysics
Building a wave frequency counter for a ripple tank/ measuring wave frequency and speed
 
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In this video I build a frequency counter for a ripple tank that didn't have one therefore enabling the calculation of wave speed on this device. Full write up and source code at : http://www.xtronical.com/projects/ripple-tank-frequency-counter/
Views: 184 XTronical
Physics Lab Demo 14: Ripple Tank
 
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A physics lab demo of the ripple tank.
Views: 185082 CarletonPhysics
3B10.60 Ripple Tank
 
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Physics Demonstration: To demonstrate the properties of diffraction and interference using water waves.
Views: 16 Physics Demos
mini ripple tank
 
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The Mini Ripple Tank is a great way to address the wave-energy standards and to teach about the properties of waves by showing how water waves behave. Ripple tank wave generators are such a wonderful way to demonstrate the principles of wave propagation, reflection, refraction, diffraction and interference, but they can be time consuming to set up and take down. This Mini Ripple Tank addresses these issues by providing a completely self contained device, requiring no set-up apart from the addition of water. Easy changing of wave frequency! Excellent for showing diffraction, 2 source interference patterns, refraction, and reflection. Great for small groups! It is small and portable, making it great for small group demonstrations or stations. http://www.arborsci.com/mini-ripple-tank
Views: 7309 Arbor Scientific
10th Class Physics, Ch 10, Ripple Tank - Class 10th Physics
 
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In this online lecture, Ms Vaneeza Abbas explains 10th class Physics Chapter 10 Simple harmonic Motion and Waves.The topic being discussed is Topic 10.5 Ripple Tank. punjab text book board/Sindh text book board/KPK text book board 10th Class book 2 lecture is conducted in Urdu/hindi/English. This lecture for 9th class Physics chapter 10 is created for all students who want to prepare this topic in detail. For more videos of Vaneeza Abbas visit https://www.ilmkidunya.com/study/10th-class-physics/simple-harmonic-motion-and-waves.aspx If you have any questions about this lecture on 9th Class Physics ch 10, you can go to https://www.instutor.com/10th-class/physics/simple-harmonic-motion-and-waves
Views: 33806 ilmkidunya
iGCSE Physics: Waves in a ripple tanks
 
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A video showing reflection, refraction, diffraction and interference of wave fronts and the relationship between wave fronts and ray diagrams.
Views: 1363 Burrows Physics
Reflecting waves in a ripple tank
 
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Reflection of waves in a ripple tank. A straight wave hits a barrier and is reflected back. If the angle of the barrier is changed instead of the wave reflecting at 180 degrees it comes off at a predictable angle. The angle of the wave hitting the barrier is called the angle of incidence. The angle at which the wave is reflected from the barrier is called the angle of reflection. If we draw a normal to the reflector ( a line at 90 degrees) then we find that the angle of incidence equals the angle of reflection. Philip M Russell Ltd Web: http://www.hemelprivatetuition.co.uk
Views: 157 Philip Russell
Wave Refraction.mp4
 
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Waves refracting when changing media and changing speed. Table of Contents: 01:08 - Waves change speed when they change media. 01:35 - 02:48 - 02:50 - Changing Direction 05:21 - 06:54 - 07:25 - 08:01 - Reflection, Refraction, Absorption
Views: 17271 ron boehmke
Strobe Ripple Tank
 
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The Strobe Ripple Tank (XWV 590 011) provides an elegant method of demonstrating the wave phenomena of reflection, diffraction, refraction and interference with none of the setting-up problems usually associated with ripple tanks.
Views: 4329 SciChemScience
Reflection in Water by Ripple Tank
 
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Reflection in Water by Ripple Tank 2. Reflection in Water by Ripple Tank Like/Share if you liked it (Y) . Subscribe to my channel for more educational videos. Also Like us on facebook for new feeds @ http://www.facebook.com/tigerzplace contents : Chapter 10: Simple Harmonic Motion and Waves (34 videos) 10.1: Oscillation 1. Working of simple pendulum 10.2: Simple Harmonic Motion 1. Introduction to Simple Harmonic Motion 2. Working of Simple Harmonic Motion 3. Problem 1-Working of Simple Harmonic Motion 4. Basic terms in SHM 5. Problem 1-Mass Attached to Spring 6. Energies Interconversion in spring-mass system 7. Problem-Ball and Bowl as SHM 8. Problem 1-Basic Terms in SHM 9. Problem-Energies Interconversion in Spring-Mass System 10.3: Simple Pendulum 1. Introduction to simple Pendulum 2. Problem-Introduction to Simple Pendulum 3. Working of simple pendulum 4. Problem-Working of Simple Pendulum 10.4: Wave Motion 1. Introductoin to Wave Motion 2. Problem 2-Characteristics of Wave 10.5: Waves as Mean of Energy Transfer 1. Waves as Carriers of Energy 2. Problem-Waves as Carriers of Energy 10.6: Types of Waves 1. Mechanical and Electromagnetic Waves 2. Problem 1-Mechanical and Electromagnetic waves 3. Introduction to Transverse and longitudnal waves 4. Problem 1-Introduction to Transverse and Longitudinal waves 5. Problem 1-Stationary waves 10.7: Characteristic Wave Parameters 1. Basic terms in SHM 2. Problem 2-Characteristics of Wave 3. Derivation of Wave Equation 4. Problem 1-Derivation of Wave Equation 10.8: Properties of Waves 1. Introducing Ripple Tank 2. Reflection in Water by Ripple Tank 3. Problem 1-Introduction to Reflection 4. Refraction in Water by Ripple Tank 5. Diffraction in Water by Ripple Tank 6. Problem 1-Introduction to Refraction 7. Interference in Water by Ripple Tank More Videos @ http://www.sabaq.pk -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Donate ( Feel Free to help me out with my work ) : ✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦ BTC: 1LrcMaefjnCz4nf8ViKR6EwHqySPAvCCEY DASH: XpVNfgAnYvLU79k5xuKc4r24md936ckPHu ETH: 0x56c9a1BC8E1BF2dD83ba512A3F9C22eff33beEF3 BNK : 0x56c9a1BC8E1BF2dD83ba512A3F9C22eff33beEF3 LTC: Levu8eJ6j9fsJe5tX8esGecLzCjvEirEC2 BCH : qqva7j6c353vkvcfky99ccxz5jjsd50mzv8dvyzyhu ----------------------------------------------- If you want to receive XEM to your account, you MUST provide sender with your Address and the unique Message below XEM:NBRA5SR2S47YFIXPQAFU2FZ5BYFDMJELO3XWLV2Q MESSAGE:yadB37sQ ------------------------------------------------ ✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦✦ -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 8273 Tigerzplace
DIY Ripple tank
 
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Looking at the properties of Waves is an important topic in physics. A ripple tank is an essential tool in learning these properties. But in many schools, there are not enough of these "ripple tanks" to go around. Here is a very simple way to create your own ripple tank at home so that you can do all the necessary experiments. All you need are: A transparent lid of a really useful box or similar. The size does not really matter. Usually, these are made of polypropene. A gooseneck table light but anything similar will do two ramekins or mugs to support the lid Water Philip M Russell Ltd Web: http://www.hemelprivatetuition.co.uk
Views: 201 Philip Russell
Wave Diffraction
 
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110 - Wave Diffraction In this video Paul Andersen explains how waves will diffract (or bend) around an obstacle or while traveling through and opening. Diffraction will be maximized when the size of the opening or obstacle matches the wavelength. Do you speak another language? Help me translate my videos: http://www.bozemanscience.com/translations/ Music Attribution Title: String Theory Artist: Herman Jolly http://sunsetvalley.bandcamp.com/track/string-theory All of the images are licensed under creative commons and public domain licensing: Alexander, ESO/M. English: Astronomers Do Not Always Swim at the Swimming Pool at the Paranal Observatory Residencia, but When They Do, They like to Show How Physical Principles Work. In This Picture the French ESO Astronomer Jean-Baptiste Le Bouquin Is Demonstrating How Waves — Not Light Waves, but Water Waves — Can Combine, or Interfere, to Create Larger Waves., January 27, 2014. http://www.eso.org/public/images/potw1404a/. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Swimming_Pool_Interferometry.jpg. Cryonic07. English: Illustration of a Simple Ripple Tank. See Also Image:Simple Ripple Tank Paddle.svg, August 30, 2007. self-made This vector image was created with Inkscape, and then manually edited. Partly based on en:Image:Ripple tank.png and en:Image:Ripple tank motor.png. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Simple_ripple_tank.svg. “Diffraction Grating.” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, April 10, 2015. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Diffraction_grating&oldid=655807039. it.wikipedia, Original uploader was A3XX at. Italiano: Fotografo:, December 4, 2006. Transferred from it.wikipedia. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Single-slit-diffraction-ripple-tank.jpg. Pajs. Vlneni Pri Pruchodu Bodovou Sterbinou (k Demonstraci Difrakce), April 28, 2015. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Difrakce_sterbina_bodova.png. ———. Vlneni Pri Pruchodu Kolem Velke Prekazky (k Denonstraci Difrakce), April 28, 2015. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Difrakce_prekazka_velka.png. ———. Vlneni Pri Pruchodu Velkou Sterbinou (k Demonstraci Difrakce), April 28, 2015. Own work. http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Difrakce_sterbina_velka.png. “Ripple Tank.” Wikipedia, the Free Encyclopedia, March 3, 2015. http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Ripple_tank&oldid=649682468. “Wave Interference.” PhET. Accessed April 16, 2015. https://phet.colorado.edu/en/simulation/wave-interference.
Views: 130082 Bozeman Science
Wave motion | Waves | Physics | FuseSchool
 
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All waves can transfer energy from one place to another without transferring any matter. This is done by a series of disturbances or vibrations that carry the energy. Just like the people in their seats, only moving up and down when it’s their turn. Waves can transfer energy through solids, liquids, gases and empty spaces – otherwise known as vacuums. There are two types of waves – which we will look at in more detail in another video, but the basic features are the same. The frequency of a wave is the number of complete waves passing a fixed point in a given amount of time. This time period is usually one second. Frequency is given the symbol f and is measured in units called Hertz. Hertz measure how many complete cycles per second; so how many people in our Mexican wave stand up every second. The frequency and period are often confused. The frequency refers to how often something happens, whereas the period refers to the time it takes to happen. The period of a wave is the time for one complete cycle. So the time taken for one person to stand up, wave and sit down. This would be measured in seconds. When something happens repeatedly we say that the event is periodic and refer to the time for the event to repeat itself. The period of the earth to orbit the sun is 365 days, the period of a day is 24 hours, the period of a typical class at school is 45 minutes. Now for the wavelength… the wavelength is the distance between a point on one wave and the same point on the next wave, for example two peaks or two troughs. Wavelength is given the symbol Lambda from the Greek letter, and is usually measured in metres. Wavelengths can vary hugely in size, x-rays are very short, visible light is here and FM radiowaves are much longer. So we’ve looked at the frequency, period and wavelength so far. Let’s finish with amplitude. As waves travel, they create disturbance. The amplitude of a wave is the distance from the maximum disturbance to its undisturbed position. Think of a very flat sea… and then an incoming wave. The amplitude is the height of the top of the wave from the flat sea. In another video we’ll be looking at the wave speed equation, and connecting wavelengths and frequencies: Wave Equation For now you just need to know what these 4 keys words mean. Frequency, period, wavelength, amplitude SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
GCSE Science Physics (9-1) Refraction of Waves
 
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Find my revision workbooks here: https://www.freesciencelessons.co.uk/workbooks/shop/ In this video, we look at refraction of waves. First we explore what is meant by refraction and look at how this is due to changes in the speed of waves as they change from one medium to another. Finally, we use the idea of wavefronts to explain how changes in wave speed cause refraction. Deliberate Thought by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution licence (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/?keywords=deliberate+thought Artist: http://incompetech.com/
Views: 110534 Freesciencelessons
Ripple Tank Wave Speed
 
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Views: 14 Andrew Bebb
Ripple Tank Reflection Refraction
 
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Reflection and Refraction in a Ripple Tank are illustrated and explained
Views: 68841 PhysicsLP
Wave behaviour | Waves | Physics for All | FuseSchool
 
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How do waves behave? Badly? In this video we are going to look at how light and sound waves behave. Before we start, you should know that waves can be transverse or longitudinal. Transmission, reflection, refraction, diffraction, absorption and scattering are all typical wave behaviours. Reflection is when waves bounce off an object. Sound waves are reflected by hard, flat surfaces and is why we get echoes. You hear a delay between the original sound and the echo, because the echoed sound waves have to travel twice as far to reach your ears. Smooth surfaces, like glass and polished metal, reflect light in a regular way, so a reflection can be seen. Like a mirror, or seeing your face in a calm pond. Transmission is when waves keep travelling in the same direction through an object. Like light through a window. Absorption and reflection often go hand in hand for light waves. White light contains each wavelength - so all the colours of visible light. The colour of an object depends on which wavelengths of light it absorbs and which it reflects. White objects reflect all the light that hits them, and absorbs none. Black objects reflect none and instead absorb all the light that hits them. A red object absorbs all the wavelengths except the red, which is reflected. And a green object absorbs all the wavelengths except the green, which is reflected. Are the new people upstairs really noisy? If they carpet their floors, add curtains and furniture to the room then you’ll notice that they become much quieter. This is because some objects absorb sound waves. When sound and light waves pass across a boundary between two substances, like air and glass, they change speed. This is because the substances have different densities. The change is speed causes the waves to change direction, which is known as refraction. Because of refraction, things in water look closer than they really are and water appears shallower than it really is. And a straw in a glass of water looks like it bends at the surface, because the refracted light wavelengths make you think the straw is in a different place to where it actually is. When waves meet a gap in a barrier, they pass through the gap. They then spread back out after they pass through the gap - this is diffraction. The way the waves re-spread depends upon how big the gap is compared to the incoming wavelengths. We have diffraction to thank for loudspeakers. Sometimes waves depart from the expected path, and spread out in multiple directions. This is known as scattering. We have scattering to thank for making the sky appear to be blue. The white light coming from the sun hits the molecules in our atmosphere, which cause the shorter blue wavelengths to scatter out in all directions. So waves behave in a variety of ways, depending upon what material they hit. CREDITS Animation & Design: Joshua Thomas https://www.instagram.com/jt_saiyan/?hl=en Narration: Dale Bennett Script: Bethan Parry SUBSCRIBE to the FuseSchool YouTube channel for many more educational videos. Our teachers and animators come together to make fun & easy-to-understand videos in Chemistry, Biology, Physics, Maths & ICT. VISIT us at www.fuseschool.org, where all of our videos are carefully organised into topics and specific orders, and to see what else we have on offer. Comment, like and share with other learners. You can both ask and answer questions, and teachers will get back to you. These videos can be used in a flipped classroom model or as a revision aid. Find all of our Chemistry videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRnpKjHpFyg&list=PLW0gavSzhMlReKGMVfUt6YuNQsO0bqSMV Find all of our Biology videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjkHzEVcyrE&list=PLW0gavSzhMlQYSpKryVcEr3ERup5SxHl0 Find all of our Maths videos here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hJq_cdz_L00&list=PLW0gavSzhMlTyWKCgW1616v3fIywogoZQ Twitter: https://twitter.com/fuseSchool Access a deeper Learning Experience in the FuseSchool platform and app: www.fuseschool.org Follow us: http://www.youtube.com/fuseschool Friend us: http://www.facebook.com/fuseschool This Open Educational Resource is free of charge, under a Creative Commons License: Attribution-NonCommercial CC BY-NC ( View License Deed: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/ ). You are allowed to download the video for nonprofit, educational use. If you would like to modify the video, please contact us: [email protected]
AQA GCSE Science Required Practicals - Waves 2 - Wave speed on a string
 
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The speed of a wave on a string using a stationary wave
Views: 16838 ATPHYSICS1
GCSE Physics Required Practical 8 - Waves
 
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GCSE Physics Required Practical video on waves. Standing waves on a piece of elastic shock cord, moving water waves in a ripple tank. All of these are sen here. Plus we work through how to count the waves and calculate wave speed from experimental data. AQA GCSE Physics playlist https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoHWkkmsfwkVUQkPCVIrpnM4sNqu2ZM36 AQA GCSE Combined Science playlist https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoHWkkmsfwkU5yAmdNQhnkr8gcEyE6yiu AQA GCSE Chemistry playlist https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLoHWkkmsfwkWjlPHlp6s6WlZWTRlRfDl9
Views: 1351 Grade Gain
Ripple Tank Experiment
 
06:41
In this experiment you learn how to find frequency, wavelength and calculate wave speed from ripple tank experiment
Views: 129 Tiras Ngugi
Core practical 2 Speed, frequency and wavelength of waves
 
09:02
Edexcel GCSE physics core practical video 2/8
The Original Double Slit Experiment
 
07:40
Light is so common that we rarely think about what it really is. But just over two hundred years ago, a groundbreaking experiment answered the question that had occupied physicists for centuries. Is light made up of waves or particles? The experiment was conducted by Thomas Young and is known as Young's Double Slit Experiment. This famous experiment is actually a simplification of a series of experiments on light conducted by Young. In a completely darkened room, Young allowed a thin beam of sunlight to pass through an aperture on his window and onto two narrow, closely spaced openings (the double slit). This sunlight then cast a shadow onto the wall behind the apparatus. Young found that the light diffracted as it passed through the slits, and then interfered with itself, created a series of light and dark spots. Since the sunlight consists of all colours of the rainbow, these colours were also visible in the projected spots. Young concluded that light consist of waves and not particles since only waves were known to diffract and interfere in exactly the manner that light did in his experiment. The way I have always seen this experiment performed is with a laser and a manufactured double slit but since the experiment was conducted in 1801 I have always thought that it should be possible to recreate the experiment using sunlight and household materials. That is basically what I did here. I will show the interference pattern I observed with my homemade double slit on 2Veritasium but I chose to use a manufactured double slit here to ensure that the pattern was impressive for observers at the beach. Special thanks to Henry, Brady, and Rupert for their cameos, Glen for filming and Josh for helping create the apparatus. Thanks also to the Royal Society for allowing us to view the original manuscript of Young's lecture and the University of Sydney for lending the double slits. Music by Kevin Mcleod (incompetech.com) Danse Macabre, Scissors
Views: 3719036 Veritasium
Waves in ripple tank (AQA Combined Science Required Practical 20)
 
00:59
Brief recap of waves in liquid required practical
Views: 88 Science Teacher
Ripple tank
 
01:53
Views: 219 ATPHYSICS1