Home
Search results “Sulfide mining pollution images”
Give to the Max 2013: Can Sulfide Mining be Funny?
 
03:57
Your gift keeps the Boundary Waters wild for generations to come: http://www.friends-bwca.org/donate We protect the Boundary Waters from threats like sulfide mining right up to the edge of the wilderness. But that takes more than sound science, it also requires creative advocacy. Here's one example - our collaboration with the Theater of Public Policy.
Views: 380 Aaron Klemz
9 TRAGIC Truths About Ocean Pollution!
 
14:45
With sea creatures dwindling at an alarming rate, many fish populations as well as our valuable reefs are on the brink of extinction. Here are 9 tragic truths about ocean pollution we can’t continue to ignore. SUBSCRIBE for the latest videos: https://goo.gl/7xzjzR Don't forget to CHECK OUT our latest upload: https://goo.gl/LUB8Xw Rubbish Cigarette butts, old worn fishing gear, tin and plastic containers from food and beverages, paper bags and one-time use products such as bottles, carrier bags, straws and utensils, are posing a huge threat to our planet, and our oceans in particular. According to the National Academy of Sciences, an estimated eight million tons of rubbish enter the world’s oceans every year. Land-based Pollution The release of minerals and toxic nutrients drain directly into our oceans which lend a reduction in oxygen levels, as well as a detriment to the quality of clean water and decaying of plant resources. Millions of motor engines release oil emissions and residue that fall onto our roads and parking lots; further, water pollution can even start off in the air. Dirt is a well-known pollutant that clogs up our waterways and settles in our oceans. Top soil and silt from fields and construction projects run into the ocean and severely threaten wildlife habitats as well. The dumping of toxic chemicals into the sea results in thermal pollution in which water temperatures rise. Ocean-based Pollution Twenty percent of marine pollution comes from ocean-based sources, such as those stemming from fishing, shipping, and cruise-ship industries. Another serious cause is contamination from efforts such as gold, copper, cobalt, and zinc mining. When the production of sulfide deposits as far as three thousand miles deep begin to infiltrate the water, the subsequent areas affected are ecosystems that survive at the lowest regions of our oceans. The growing toxicity from oil leaks, corrosion, and oil spills to these regions results in permanent damage to the marine habitats found there. Rubbish & The Repercussions According to a recent study conducted by the University of Georgia, enough waste ends up in our oceans every year to line every coast on the planet with five bulging bags of trash. If we continue the careless dance of disposing of our garbage by improper means, man-made items such as plastic bottles, aluminum cans, clothing, and other nonbiodegradable packaging products can reach the sea and get washed back ashore. Underwater Canyons According to a survey off the sunny coast of Monterey Bay, California, a discovery was made regarding the astonishing amount of litter lodged in the deeper parts of the canyon there. The Monterey Canyon is a famous underwater trench spanning ninety-five miles, and due to its depth of 11,800 feet, the canyon hosts many unique underwater organisms that make Monterey Bay an important ecological area. Home to the largest national marine sanctuary in the United States, Monterey Bay and its canyon play a dynamic role in aquatic health and biodiversity. The Imperfections of Plastic Scientists have determined that around the end of 2017, there was a 1:2 ratio of plastic to plankton permeating our waters. The number of plastics alone was estimated at around 150 million tons— approximately one fifth of the weight of all fish inhabiting our oceans! The study further concludes that if this problem isn’t solved soon, plastic will well outnumber fish by the year 2050. A Great Patch of Floating Trash There’s a patch of marine litter in the Pacific Ocean with many names: called the North Pacific Gyre by some, the Pacific Trash Vortex by others, and most commonly— the Great Pacific Garbage Patch. The largest oceanic site for ocean plastic in the world, this titanic titan of trash sifts in the middle of the ocean between Hawaii and California. The GPGP is the biggest of five other plastic accumulation points located among our planet’s oceans. You Are what You Eat Due to the notion that seventy percent of our earth’s surface is covered in water, the general consensus is that pollutants will imminently dilute and then disappear. This may be the case if it weren’t for the 228.450 known species in the ocean (and another two million remaining a complete mystery), which must eat on a daily basis. Destruction & Extinction Each year, 100,000 sea mammals and organisms die from ocean pollution alone. More than 1/3 of shellfish populations growing in waters around the United States are subsequently harmed by coastal pollution. Our illustrious coral reefs are turning white and diminishing by the second, a direct cause of abandonment from algae, as algae are forced to seek alternative shelter unaffected by sunlight and thermal temperatures. Every year 300,000 dolphins and porpoises are killed by becoming entangled in fishing nets and other hazardous flotsam.
Views: 2764 What Lurks Below
Effects of Sulfide Mining  on the BWCA, Boundary Waters Canoe Area
 
01:52:29
This second video (also 55 min. long, although YouTube shows it as longer) is as important and Lee's talk earlier in the day on Climate Change and Invasive species but concentrates on the effects of sulfide mining on the Boundary Waters. It is also applicable to all the other areas of the Arrowhead region that need protecting from Sufide mining. Lee's standing in the scientific community makes his research, observations and conclusions even more powerful. Becky Rom, from campaign to Save the Boundary Waters adds further evidence, based on research, that we must protect our region from Sulfide Mining. This talk along with Lee's early talk are a must for anyone wondering, "Is this as bad as I have been hearing?" And, the answer is, based on fact, experience , and research, YES! It is a nightmare we don't want here.
Nanotechnology : Dr. L. Petrik - Acid Mine Water.wmv
 
11:43
A five-part series introducing ground-breaking innovation in Nanotechnology in South Africa, produced for the Sci-Bono Discovery Centre in Johannesburg. (Disclaimer: Stonefish Studios accepts no liability for the use of any images supplied by Speakers, Scientists, or the Sci_Bono Discovery Centre, in the production of these podcasts). See also http://www.stonefishstudios.com, and view more from t\his Director at http://www.livestream.com/stonefishstudiossouthafrica
Views: 164 Rusty Stanley
Acidophiles in acid mine drainage - Video Learning - WizScience.com
 
02:11
The outflow of acidic liquids and other pollutants from mines is often catalysed by acid-loving microorganisms; these are the "acidophiles in acid mine drainage". Acidophiles are not just present in exotic environments such as Yellowstone National Park or deep-sea hydrothermal vents. Genera such as Acidithiobacillus and Leptospirillum bacteria, and Thermoplasmatales archaea, are present in syntrophic relationships in the more mundane environments of concrete sewer pipes and implicated in the heavy-metal-containing, sulfurous waters of rivers such as the Rheidol. Such microorganisms are responsible for the phenomenon of acid mine drainage and thus are important both economically and from a conservation perspective. Control of these acidophiles and their harnessing for industrial biotechnology shows their effect need not be entirely negative. The use of acidophilic organisms in mining is a new technique for extracting trace metals through bioleaching, and offers solutions for the phenomenon of acid mine drainage in mining spoils. Upon exposure to oxygen and water , metal sulfides undergo oxidation to produce metal-rich acidic effluent. If the pH is low enough to overcome the natural buffering capacity of the surrounding rocks , the surrounding area may become acidic, as well as contaminated with high levels of heavy metals. Though acidophiles have an important place in the iron and sulfur biogeochemical cycles, strongly acidic environments are overwhelmingly anthropogenic in cause, primarily created at the cessation of mining operations where sulfide minerals, such as pyrite , are present. Wiz Science™ is "the" learning channel for children and all ages. SUBSCRIBE TODAY Disclaimer: This video is for your information only. The author or publisher does not guarantee the accuracy of the content presented in this video. USE AT YOUR OWN RISK. Background Music: "The Place Inside" by Silent Partner (royalty-free) from YouTube Audio Library. This video uses material/images from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Acidophiles+in+acid+mine+drainage, which is released under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . This video is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/ . To reuse/adapt the content in your own work, you must comply with the license terms.
Views: 1680 Wiz Science™
Our Bugs Eat Rocks
 
02:39
A natural way to clean up mine waste using bacteria! BacTech proposes to remediate mine pollution in Bolivia at NO COST to the community or government. To do so, BacTech wishes to use crowdfunding to raise $30,000 to conduct all the necessary assaying, flotation and bioleach testwork to determine if the project is viable. Once this is determined, BacTech will reach out to ethical, socially responsible, cleantech and impact investment sources to finance a full-scale remediation project. Please visit our campaign page for more information: http://bit.ly/BugsEatRocks
Views: 592 BacTech Green
Climate Change - footage available for download
 
02:14
3D footage available for download http://footage.shutterstock.com/clip-2856133-stock-footage-the-pollution-of-greenhouse-gases-into-the-atmosphere-air-along-with-the-radiation-of-the-sun.html http://footage.shutterstock.com/clip-2855974-stock-footage-pan-across-surface-of-earth-atmosphere-sun-rays-encompass-entire-screen.html As greenhouse gas emission & air pollutants increase they continue to clog the stratosphere, & the important filtering system which stops some of the sun's UV Rays from escaping the earth's stratosphere, resulting in what we know as global warming. Using beautiful 3D imagery & special effects, we demonstrates the effects of global warming on our planet.
Views: 2264 3DmeCreativeStudio
CWM Foamy Discharge
 
00:28
Buffalo Niagara RIVERKEEPER Riverwatch team found this mysterious foam in the Niagara River that had been discharged from a toxic waste facility.
Views: 179 BfloNiagaraRvrkpr
Andrew Szydlo's Chemistry of Coal
 
01:18:30
Andrew Szydlo is back at the Ri to introduce us all to the surprising chemistry of coal. Subscribe for regular science videos: http://bit.ly/RiSubscRibe From its initial discovery, its use as the fuel of the industrial revolution, to some of the more interesting and exciting compounds we can obtain from coal, Andrew takes us on an illuminating tour of this intriguing rock. Andrew Szydlo is a chemist and secondary school teacher at Highgate School, well-loved by pupils and Ri attendees alike. This talk filmed in the Ri on 3 November 2018. --- A very special thank you to our Patreon supporters who help make these videos happen, especially: Alessandro Mecca, Ashok Bommisetti, Avrahaim Chein, bestape, David Lindo, Elizabeth Greasley, Greg Nagel, Lester Su, Rebecca Pan, Robert D Finrock, Roger Baker, Sergei Solovev and Will Knott. --- The Ri is on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/TheRoyalInstitution and Twitter: http://twitter.com/ri_science and Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/royalinstitution and Tumblr: http://ri-science.tumblr.com/ Our editorial policy: http://www.rigb.org/home/editorial-policy Subscribe for the latest science videos: http://bit.ly/RiNewsletter
Views: 105307 The Royal Institution
Latin America EPC Summit | Chili's Copper Mining Solutions | GE Mining Solutions
 
04:28
Chili's copper mining challenges and solutions discussed at the Latin America EPC Summit on March 24, 2012. Take a moment to like, add to your favorites or share with a friend. http://www.ge.com/mining Chili mining faces power generation and distribution along with water management and productivity. GE Mining Solutions can provide the technology of water desalination and pumping used for off-shore oil rigs to pump water 2000 meters or even 4000 meters for mineral mining in the Chili mountains.
Views: 284 GE Reports
Coal: Engine of Change
 
56:47
This 60-minute documentary interweaves the development of modern life with innovations in energy technologies in Great Britain and the United States. Coal played a major role from the start, shaping the stage with other fossil fuels by the end of the twentieth century. What will happen in the twenty-first century as we factor addressing concerns about human influence on global climate with the ever-increasing demand for energy and all it provides? Includes expert interviews from Sacramento, CA; Gainesville, FL; Lowell, MA; Minneapolis, MN; New York City, NY; Beulah and Grand Forks, ND; Pittsburgh and Rankin, PA; Dallas and Houston, TX; Arlington, VA; White Salmon, WA; Estavan, SK, Canada; United Kingdom; France; and Sweden.
Views: 942 Prairie Public
Sulfur cycle
 
23:59
The sulfur cycle is the collection of processes by which sulfur moves to and from minerals (including the waterways) and living systems. Such biogeochemical cycles are important in geology because they affect many minerals. Biogeochemical cycles are also important for life because sulfur is an essential element, being a constituent of many proteins and cofactors. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 3896 Audiopedia
Mining industry | Wikipedia audio article
 
57:15
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining 00:01:48 1 History 00:01:57 1.1 Prehistoric mining 00:03:13 1.2 Ancient Egypt 00:04:23 1.3 Ancient Greek and Roman mining 00:08:00 1.4 Medieval Europe 00:12:01 1.5 Classical Philippine civilization 00:13:12 1.6 The Americas 00:16:14 1.7 Modern period 00:17:49 2 Mine development and lifecycle 00:20:32 3 Mining techniques 00:22:00 3.1 Surface mining 00:23:03 3.2 Underground mining 00:24:32 3.3 Highwall mining 00:26:16 4 Machines 00:27:38 5 Processing 00:30:22 6 Environmental effects 00:34:25 6.1 Waste 00:36:53 6.2 Renewable energy and mining 00:37:36 7 Mining industry 00:41:45 7.1 Corporate classifications 00:42:33 7.2 Regulation and governance 00:46:31 7.3 World Bank 00:48:38 8 Safety 00:52:16 9 Records 00:54:44 10 Metal reserves and recycling Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.998962699879125 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth, usually from an orebody, lode, vein, seam, reef or placer deposit. These deposits form a mineralized package that is of economic interest to the miner. Ores recovered by mining include metals, coal, oil shale, gemstones, limestone, chalk, dimension stone, rock salt, potash, gravel, and clay. Mining is required to obtain any material that cannot be grown through agricultural processes, or created artificially in a laboratory or factory. Mining in a wider sense includes extraction of any non-renewable resource such as petroleum, natural gas, or even water. Mining of stones and metal has been a human activity since pre-historic times. Modern mining processes involve prospecting for ore bodies, analysis of the profit potential of a proposed mine, extraction of the desired materials, and final reclamation of the land after the mine is closed. De Re Metallica, Georgius Agricola, 1550, Book I, Para. 1Mining operations usually create a negative environmental impact, both during the mining activity and after the mine has closed. Hence, most of the world's nations have passed regulations to decrease the impact. Work safety has long been a concern as well, and modern practices have significantly improved safety in mines. Levels of metals recycling are generally low. Unless future end-of-life recycling rates are stepped up, some rare metals may become unavailable for use in a variety of consumer products. Due to the low recycling rates, some landfills now contain higher concentrations of metal than mines themselves.
Views: 59 wikipedia tts
Titanium
 
36:05
Titanium is a chemical element with the symbol Ti and atomic number 22. It is a lustrous transition metal with a silver color, low density and high strength. It is highly resistant to corrosion in sea water, aqua regia and chlorine. Titanium was discovered in Cornwall, Great Britain, by William Gregor in 1791 and named by Martin Heinrich Klaproth for the Titans of Greek mythology. The element occurs within a number of mineral deposits, principally rutile and ilmenite, which are widely distributed in the Earth's crust and lithosphere, and it is found in almost all living things, rocks, water bodies, and soils. The metal is extracted from its principal mineral ores via the Kroll process or the Hunter process. Its most common compound, titanium dioxide, is a popular photocatalyst and is used in the manufacture of white pigments. Other compounds include titanium tetrachloride (TiCl4), a component of smoke screens and catalysts; and titanium trichloride (TiCl3), which is used as a catalyst in the production of polypropylene. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 4853 Audiopedia
Graphite
 
27:21
Graphite /ˈɡræfaɪt/ is made almost entirely of carbon atoms, and as with diamond, is a semimetal native element mineral, and an allotrope of carbon. Graphite, meaning "writing stone", was named by Abraham Gottlob Werner in 1789 from the Ancient Greek γράφω (graphō), "to draw/write", for its use in pencils, where it is known as lead (not to be confused with the metallic element lead). Graphite is the most stable form of carbon under standard conditions. Therefore, it is used in thermochemistry as the standard state for defining the heat of formation of carbon compounds. Graphite may be considered the highest grade of coal, just above anthracite and alternatively called meta-anthracite, although it is not normally used as fuel because it is difficult to ignite. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1698 Audiopedia
Crystallization | #aumsum
 
04:59
Crystallization. Food tastes good due to the addition of salt in it. Salt is obtained by the evaporation of seawater. However, this salt is impure and has small crystals. This salt can be converted into pure state by the process of crystallization. Crystallization is the process of formation of large crystals in pure state from their solutions.
Views: 840306 It's AumSum Time
Bituminous coal
 
08:43
Bituminous coal or black coal is a relatively soft coal containing a tarlike substance called bitumen. It is of higher quality than lignite coal but of poorer quality than anthracite. Formation is usually the result of high pressure being exerted on lignite. Its coloration can be black or sometimes dark brown; often there are well-defined bands of bright and dull material within the seams. These distinctive sequences, which are classified according to either "dull, bright-banded" or "bright, dull-banded", is how bituminous coals are stratigraphically identified. Bituminous coal is an organic sedimentary rock formed by diagenetic and sub metamorphic compression of peat bog material. Its primary constituents are macerals: vitrinite, and liptinite. The carbon content of bituminous coal is around 60-80%; the rest is composed of water, air, hydrogen, and sulphur, which have not been driven off from the macerals. Bank density is approximately 1346 kg/m³. Bulk density typically runs to 833 kg/m³. The heat content of bituminous coal ranges from 24 to 35 MJ/kg on a moist, mineral-matter-free basis. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 3314 Audiopedia
Mining
 
52:45
Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth from an orebody, lode, vein, seam, or reef, which forms the mineralized package of economic interest to the miner. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Public domain image source in video
Views: 261 encyclopediacc
health alert(sulfur dioxide poison) 1 Bedroom apartment windber PA $340 612 cherry st
 
00:10
Photo image of only inhabitable room of 3 during winter months **Health alert**"1 bedroom, 1 bath, laundry room, off street parking, $340/mo plus security deposit ($400/mo with refrigerator & stove) utilities not included. No pets call" This postings purpose is a health alert to individuals seeking to rent the above noted who may suffer from a respiratory illness (asthma, COPD) or chronic sinusitis http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/toxfaqs/TF.asp?id=252&tid=46 Landlords typically are required to inform tenants of circumstances that would make an apartment uninhabitable whereas the apartment in question has an air quality control issue stemming from its locality within Windber PA.http://www.city-data.com/city/Windber-Pennsylvania.html The residence is located on a mountain side above Windber which is situated within a valley surrounded by mountainous terrain. Windber is known for its coal mines situated nearby and housing in the valley utilizing coal as a heating source. Windber per city data has a sulfur dioxide level 2 times higher than the national level as measured in ppb (sulfur dioxide is related to hydrogen sulfide (rotten egg odor) and sulfuric acid in batteries). Sulfur dioxide levels reach toxicity at 100 ppb. Sulfur dioxide is considered an irritant to air passages in which so2 aspired becomes sulfide which can be measured in urine or blood if exposed. For anyone considering renting the apartment with above noted health situations obtaining an agreement to have the air quality tested by the land lord (Dennis Hoffman,owner) by the PA Environmental Protection Agency(Steve Hepler) contact number 412.442.4170 through the Allegheny Environmental Health prior to move in date and/or signing the agreement. The sulfur level increases on cold windy days during the heating season-2 rooms within the apartment become saturated with sulfur with the doors closed making them uninhabitable for sleeping purposes. The owner denies the existence of an odor although those acclimated to such odors are less likely to detect due to the olfactory system. The lease agreement for the apartment is monthly although the tenant will lose his/her security deposit if the apartment is vacated prior to one year for health/environmental conditions if he/she chooses to do so. One important tenant right owner apparently is not aware of is the right to privacy in that on several occasions he or someone in his family enters without notice or scheduling an appropriate time."You have the right to enjoy your property and not have your landlord interfere with that enjoyment unless it is necessary. Pennsylvania tenant rights allow landlords to enter a dwelling only for repairs or inspections, and only after providing reasonable notice. Your landlord may enter your apartment without violating your PA tenant rights if emergency repairs are needed and giving notice would lead to further damage to possessions or danger to tenants." http://real-estate.laws.com/pennsylvania-landlord-tenant-law
Views: 98 Patrick Engle
Rio Tinto, Spain (Red River)
 
01:20
The Río Tinto (red river) is a river in southwestern Spain that originates in the Sierra Morena mountains of Andalusia. It flows generally south-southwest, reaching the Gulf of Cádiz at Huelva. This unearthly, reddish river in southwestern Spain is unlike any you've ever seen before. The water gets its coloration from iron dissolved in the water, and is notable for being extremely acidic. This may not sound like a suitable place to find life, but living in the bizarre waters of Rio Tinto are extremophile aerobic microorganisms that feed on the iron and sulphide minerals plentiful in the river. Since ancient times, a site along the river has been mined for copper, silver, gold, and other minerals. In approximately 3,000 BC, Iberians and Tartessians began mining the site, followed by the Phoenicians, Greeks, Romans, Visigoths, and Moors. After a period of abandonment, the mines were rediscovered in 1556 and the Spanish government began operating them once again in 1724. As a possible result of the mining, Río Tinto is notable for being very acidic (pH 2) and its deep reddish hue is due to iron dissolved in the water. Acid mine drainage from the mines leads to severe environmental problems due to the heavy metal concentrations in the river. In 1873, Rio Tinto Company was formed to operate the mines; by the end of the 20th century it had become one of the world's largest multinational mining companies, although it no longer controls the Rio Tinto mines; these are now owned by EMED Mining plc. Scientists now believe that these conditions could be the perfect analogue to what happens when liquid water flows on other planets or moons, such as on Mars or perhaps on Jupiter's moon, Europa. If life can survive under these conditions here on Earth, then it's possible that it also has survived elsewhere, making Rio Tinto an important case study into astrobiology. In fact, data retrieved from NASA's Opportunity rover has shown that similar conditions to those at Rio Tinto have existed on Mars in the past. Subsribe on Happy Traveler - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCB7ViK_fZPd3-3XzIgQKWYg?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 13547 Happy Traveler
Mining | Wikipedia audio article
 
59:03
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mining 00:01:51 1 History 00:02:00 1.1 Prehistoric mining 00:03:18 1.2 Ancient Egypt 00:04:31 1.3 Ancient Greek and Roman mining 00:08:15 1.4 Medieval Europe 00:12:23 1.5 Classical Philippine civilization 00:13:36 1.6 The Americas 00:16:44 1.7 Modern period 00:18:22 2 Mine development and life cycle 00:21:09 3 Mining techniques 00:22:39 3.1 Surface mining 00:23:44 3.2 Underground mining 00:25:16 3.3 Highwall mining 00:27:02 4 Machines 00:28:27 5 Processing 00:31:18 6 Environmental effects 00:35:27 6.1 Waste 00:38:00 6.2 Renewable energy and mining 00:38:45 7 Mining industry 00:43:04 7.1 Corporate classifications 00:43:54 7.2 Regulation and governance 00:47:59 7.3 World Bank 00:50:07 8 Safety 00:53:52 9 Records 00:56:26 10 Metal reserves and recycling Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9838512602070575 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Mining is the extraction of valuable minerals or other geological materials from the earth, usually from an ore body, lode, vein, seam, reef or placer deposit. These deposits form a mineralized package that is of economic interest to the miner. Ores recovered by mining include metals, coal, oil shale, gemstones, limestone, chalk, dimension stone, rock salt, potash, gravel, and clay. Mining is required to obtain any material that cannot be grown through agricultural processes, or feasibly created artificially in a laboratory or factory. Mining in a wider sense includes extraction of any non-renewable resource such as petroleum, natural gas, or even water. Mining of stones and metal has been a human activity since pre-historic times. Modern mining processes involve prospecting for ore bodies, analysis of the profit potential of a proposed mine, extraction of the desired materials, and final reclamation of the land after the mine is closed. De Re Metallica, Georgius Agricola, 1550, Book I, Para. 1Mining operations usually create a negative environmental impact, both during the mining activity and after the mine has closed. Hence, most of the world's nations have passed regulations to decrease the impact. Work safety has long been a concern as well, and modern practices have significantly improved safety in mines. Levels of metals recycling are generally low. Unless future end-of-life recycling rates are stepped up, some rare metals may become unavailable for use in a variety of consumer products. Due to the low recycling rates, some landfills now contain higher concentrations of metal than mines themselves.
Views: 17 wikipedia tts
Geoengineering Animation
 
01:35
This is for my English 102 pubic turn.
Views: 177 Nathan Vance
Groundwater in 16 States found to be contaminated by uranium
 
00:58
Groundwater in 16 States found to be contaminated by uranium
Views: 729 ETV Andhra Pradesh
Tin
 
30:28
Tin
Tin is a chemical element with symbol Sn (for Latin: stannum) and atomic number 50. It is a main group metal in group 14 of the periodic table. Tin shows chemical similarity to both neighboring group-14 elements, germanium and lead, and has two possible oxidation states, +2 and the slightly more stable +4. Tin is the 49th most abundant element and has, with 10 stable isotopes, the largest number of stable isotopes in the periodic table. Tin is obtained chiefly from the mineral cassiterite, where it occurs as tin dioxide, SnO2. This silvery, malleable other metal is not easily oxidized in air and is used to coat other metals to prevent corrosion. The first alloy, used in large scale since 3000 BC, was bronze, an alloy of tin and copper. After 600 BC pure metallic tin was produced. Pewter, which is an alloy of 85--90% tin with the remainder commonly consisting of copper, antimony and lead, was used for flatware from the Bronze Age until the 20th century. In modern times tin is used in many alloys, most notably tin/lead soft solders, typically containing 60% or more of tin. Another large application for tin is corrosion-resistant tin plating of steel. Because of its low toxicity, tin-plated metal is also used for food packaging, giving the name to tin cans, which are made mostly of steel. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1358 Audiopedia
GOLD - WikiVidi Documentary
 
01:05:52
Gold is a chemical element with symbol Au and atomic number 79. In its purest form, it is a bright, slightly reddish yellow, dense, soft, malleable, and ductile metal. Chemically, gold is a transition metal and a group 11 element. It is one of the least reactive chemical elements and is solid under standard conditions. Gold often occurs in free elemental form, as nuggets or grains, in rocks, in veins, and in alluvial deposits. It occurs in a solid solution series with the native element silver and also naturally alloyed with copper and palladium. Less commonly, it occurs in minerals as gold compounds, often with tellurium . Gold is thought to have been produced in supernova nucleosynthesis, from the collision of neutron stars, and to have been present in the dust from which the Solar System formed. Because the Earth was molten when it was formed, almost all of the gold present in the early Earth probably sank into the planetary core. Therefore, most of the gold that is in the Eart... http://www.wikividi.com ____________________________________ Shortcuts to chapters: 00:03:50: Characteristics 00:05:15: Color 00:06:53: Isotopes 00:08:36: Synthesis 00:10:58: Chemistry 00:15:03: Rare oxidation states 00:17:08: Occurrence 00:22:22: Seawater 00:24:09: History 00:31:41: Etymology 00:32:23: Culture 00:34:36: Mining and prospecting 00:38:24: Extraction and refining 00:39:56: Consumption 00:40:40: Pollution 00:42:56: Monetary use 00:49:01: Price 00:50:03: History 00:54:29: Jewelry 00:56:31: Electronics 00:59:30: Medicine ____________________________________ Copyright WikiVidi. Licensed under Creative Commons. Wikipedia link: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gold
MSA Permanent Gas Monitoring System Custom Products
 
04:07
Steve Bayer talks about MSA's custom products capabilities in the permanent instruments area.
Views: 714 MSA
"Treasure Hunting" ~ A documentary against gold mining (French Subtitles)
 
01:39:11
In greek with french subtitles. "Chasse au tresor", un documentaire contre les mines d'or a Halkidiki, au nord de la Grece. Titre : "Chasse au trésor" (1h39'), 2007 "Chasse au trésor", est un film collectif, "un film d'investigation sur l'extraction de l'or au nord de Halkidiki", selon les réalisateurs. Il a était fini en 2007, et retrace la longue lutte des habitants de certains villages de la région de Halkidiki, au nord de la Grèce, qui s'opposent à la construction d'une mine d'or en plein milieu d'une des plus belles foret du pays par une compagnie canadienne. Le documentaire fini avec la victoire des habitants du village de Olympiada et le commencement de la lutte des habitants de Megali Panagia et Ierissos contre le lancement d'un nouveau plan d'extraction près de leurs villages. Une lutte qu'aujourd'hui, 6 ans après, est devenu une des luttes principales qui se déroulent dans le territoire grecque. La traduction et le sous-titrage sont le fruit d'un effort collectif, qui n'aurai jamais eu lieux sans le dynamisme et la joyeuse folie de notre chère amie Clémentine, qui nous a quitté soudainement cette année. Elle sera toujours entre nous, à travers la vie qu'on donne à tout ce qu'elle a fait vivre. Bon voyage.
Views: 6433 Perseus999
Carbon Cycle in Hindi कार्बन चक्र Educational Video for Students
 
04:17
For more science videos,visit http://www.makemegenius.com The carbon cycle is the cycle by which carbon is exchanged among the biosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere, and atmosphere of the Earth.In short,the carbon cycle is a complex series of processes through which all the carbon atoms; in existence; rotate.
Views: 65373 MakeMeGeniusIndia
President's message
 
02:17
Take a closer look Kennecott Utah Copper's 2011 Sustainable Development report at: http://2011sdreport.kennecott.com. Sustainable development is more than marketing speak at Rio Tinto's Kennecott Utah Copper. Each year, the Sustainable Development Report is put together to help communicate with local communities and other interested stakeholders about our commitment to sustainable development. In this two-minute video, President and CEO Kelly Sanders talks about our 2011 sustainable development challenges and accomplishments.
Views: 1053 Kennecott Utah Copper
What is Black Salt | Health Benefits of Black Salt
 
12:05
Black Salt Benefits: Elixir for Skin, Hair and Body. Black salt, A type of rock sat, composed largely of sodium chloride with several other components lending the salt its color and smell. Black salt benefits are plenty, and it acts as a cooling spice and recommended as a treatment for many health issues. It is very popular in India, Middle East, France, Japan and Spain. It’s also called as ‘Black lava salt’, ‘kala namak’ salt or ‘sanchal’ and is a type of volcanic rock salt. It’s commonly used in Asian countries surrounding the Himalayan Mountains like India and Pakistan. It has been used for hundreds of years as traditional medicine, for cooking and as a beauty aid ► SUBSCRIBE our channel: https://goo.gl/5F04NY 💋 G+:https://goo.gl/lQsL5w Twitter: https://goo.gl/lQDTlX 💋Pinterest: https://goo.gl/EZLI5T ► If there are any copyright issues with any videos posted here i will remove them. ► Thanks for watching! 💋Please watch: 💋Health :https://goo.gl/x3JCp9
Views: 37949 Useful info
Mod-01 Lec-37 Lecture-37-Energy and Environment Related Issues in Nonferrous Metals Production
 
53:38
Non-ferrous Extractive Metallurgy by Prof.H.S. Ray,Department of Metallurgical & Materials Engineering,IIT Kharagpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 492 nptelhrd
Pollution in California | Wikipedia audio article
 
52:59
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pollution_in_California 00:01:55 1 History 00:04:11 2 Air pollution 00:04:59 2.1 Los Angeles Air Pollution 00:07:35 2.2 Bay Area Air Pollution 00:09:08 2.3 Pollution as an Externality 00:10:43 2.4 Dangers to Health 00:12:09 2.5 Government Intervention 00:14:00 2.6 Tailpipe pollution 00:17:19 2.6.1 Effects of Tailpipe Emissions 00:19:26 2.6.2 Emissions Regulatory Efforts in California 00:24:53 2.6.3 Reformation Efforts 00:26:23 2.7 Air Pollution and Low Socioeconomic Status Communities in California 00:27:18 2.8 Instances of Environmental Injustice 00:27:28 2.8.1 Diabetes in Los Angeles County Latino children 00:29:51 2.8.2 Proximity of schools to vehicle traffic in Culver City 00:32:07 2.8.3 Fracking violations in Kern County school zones 00:34:39 2.8.4 Inequalities in cumulative environmental burdens among three urbanized counties in California 00:37:28 2.8.5 Proposed coal terminal in West Oakland 00:39:56 3 Causes 00:42:02 4 Effects 00:44:07 5 Water Pollution 00:44:16 5.1 Gold Rush Era 00:45:43 5.2 Early 1900's 00:46:36 5.3 leaded Gasoline 00:47:24 5.4 Increased NH4 00:48:18 5.5 Regulation 00:50:48 5.6 Ocean Litter 00:52:21 6 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9722754494416077 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Pollution in California relates to the degree of pollution in the air, water, and land of the state of California. Pollution is defined as the addition of any substance (solid, liquid, or gas) or any form of energy (such as heat, sound, or radioactivity) to the environment at a faster rate than it can be dispersed, diluted, decomposed, recycled, or stored in some harmless form. The combination of three main factors are the cause of notable unhealthy levels of air pollution in California: the activities of over 39 million people, a mountainous terrain that traps pollution, and a warm climate that helps form ozone and other pollutants. Eight of the ten cities in the US with the highest year-round concentration of particulate matter between 2013 and 2015 were in California, and seven out of the ten cities in the US with the worst ozone pollution were also in California. Studies show that pollutants prevalent in California are linked to several health issues, including asthma, lung cancer, birth complications, and premature death. In 2016, Bakersfield, California recorded the highest level of airborne pollutants of any city in the United States.Water pollution is defined by the Federal Clean Water Act as "dredge spoil, solid waste, incinerator residue, sewage, garbage, sewage sludge, munitions, chemical wastes, biological materials, heat, wrecked or discarded equipment, rock, sand, cellar dirt, and industrial, municipal, and agricultural waste discharged into water." In 2011, an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) study showed that water quality standards were not met on 1.6 million acres of California's 3 million acres of lakes, bays, wetlands and estuaries. The Porter-Cologne Water Quality Control Act governs the water quality regulation in California.
Views: 4 wikipedia tts
Mod-01 Lec-02 Lecture-02-Brief History of Non-ferrous Metal (Contd.)
 
50:45
Non-ferrous Extractive Metallurgy by Prof.H.S. Ray,Department of Metallurgical & Materials Engineering,IIT Kharagpur.For more details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 4782 nptelhrd
Skip Sandman at Lake Avenue Idle No More Duluth, MN January 11th, 2013
 
04:59
This is a slightly revised version of my WGZS-FM interview with Skip Sandman during the Idle No More Jingle Dress, Round Dance demonstration in Duluth, MN on January 11th, 2013. I provided a little snippet of video at the beginning that provides important context. Here are drummers and dancers on four corners of Lake Avenue and Superior Street on a busy Friday. So the busiest intersection in the heart of the city on one of the busiest days. Skip Sandman talks very eloquently about the history and beliefs about this symbolic, spiritual action in the video. I cannot believe that I was able to get such clear images of him on my little point-and-shoot $60 Fujifilm camera. Special thanks to Ivy Vainio for releasing some of her wonderful images of the event to be used in this video.
Views: 171 JP Rennquist
Shale oil extraction
 
32:01
Shale oil extraction is an industrial process for unconventional oil production. This process converts kerogen in oil shale into shale oil by pyrolysis, hydrogenation, or thermal dissolution. The resultant shale oil is used as fuel oil or upgraded to meet refinery feedstock specifications by adding hydrogen and removing sulfur and nitrogen impurities. Shale oil extraction is usually performed above ground by mining the oil shale and then treating it in processing facilities. Other modern technologies perform the processing underground by applying heat and extracting the oil via oil wells. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1892 Audiopedia
Catalytic converter
 
28:45
A catalytic converter is a vehicle emissions control device that converts toxic pollutants in exhaust gas to less toxic pollutants by catalyzing a redox reaction (oxidation or reduction). Catalytic converters are used in internal combustion engines fueled by either petrol (gasoline) or diesel—including lean burn engines. The first widespread introduction of catalytic converters was in the United States automobile market. Manufacturers of 1975 model year equipped gasoline-powered vehicles with catalytic converters to comply with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's stricter regulation of exhaust emissions. These "two-way" converters combined carbon monoxide (CO) with unburned hydrocarbons (HC) to produce carbon dioxide (CO2) and water (H2O). In 1981, two-way catalytic converters were rendered obsolete by "three-way" converters that also reduce oxides of nitrogen (NOx); however, two-way converters are still used for lean burn engines. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 526 Audiopedia
Activated carbon
 
31:23
Activated carbon, also called activated charcoal, activated coal, or carbo activatus, is a form of carbon processed to have small, low-volume pores that increase the surface area available for adsorption or chemical reactions. Activated is sometimes substituted with active. Due to its high degree of microporosity, just one gram of activated carbon has a surface area in excess of 500 m2, as determined by gas adsorption. An activation level sufficient for useful application may be attained solely from high surface area; however, further chemical treatment often enhances adsorption properties. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 42161 Audiopedia
Alkalinity
 
14:41
Alkalinity is the name given to the quantitative capacity of an aqueous solution to neutralize an acid. Measuring alkalinity is important in determining a stream's ability to neutralize acidic pollution from rainfall or wastewater. It is one of the best measures of the sensitivity of the stream to acid inputs. There can be long-term changes in the alkalinity of rivers and streams in response to human disturbances. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 132 Audiopedia
Coal gas
 
21:41
Coal gas is a flammable gaseous fuel made from coal and supplied to the user via a piped distribution system. Town gas is a more general term referring to manufactured gaseous fuels produced for sale to consumers and municipalities. Coal gas contains a variety of calorific gases including hydrogen, carbon monoxide, methane and volatile hydrocarbons together with small quantities of non-calorific gases such as carbon dioxide and nitrogen. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 649 Audiopedia
Module 4: Introduction to Aerosols
 
54:51
The objectives for this module are that, by the end, learners should be able to (1) define "aerosol" and related terms, (2) interpret summary properties of particle size distributions, (3) predict the relationship between aerosol source and particle size, and (4) describe approaches to measuring airborne particles
Views: 12399 METPHAST Program
Natural resource economics
 
22:42
Natural resource economics deals with the supply, demand, and allocation of the Earth's natural resources. One main objective of natural resource economics is to better understand the role of natural resources in the economy in order to develop more sustainable methods of managing those resources to ensure their availability to future generations. Resource economists study interactions between economic and natural systems, with the goal of developing a sustainable and efficient economy. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 881 Audiopedia
Natural gas
 
42:23
Natural gas is a fossil fuel formed when layers of buried plants, gases, and animals are exposed to intense heat and pressure over thousands of years. The energy that the plants originally obtained from the sun is stored in the form of chemical bonds in natural gas. Natural gas is a nonrenewable resource because it cannot be replenished on a human time frame. Natural gas is a hydrocarbon gas mixture consisting primarily of methane, but commonly includes varying amounts of other higher alkanes and even a lesser percentage of carbon dioxide, nitrogen, and hydrogen sulfide. Natural gas is an energy source often used for heating, cooking, and electricity generation. It is also used as fuel for vehicles and as a chemical feedstock in the manufacture of plastics and other commercially important organic chemicals. Natural gas is found in deep underground rock formations or associated with other hydrocarbon reservoirs in coal beds and as methane clathrates. Petroleum is another resource and fossil fuel found in close proximity to, and with natural gas. Most natural gas was created over time by two mechanisms: biogenic and thermogenic. Biogenic gas is created by methanogenic organisms in marshes, bogs, landfills, and shallow sediments. Deeper in the earth, at greater temperature and pressure, thermogenic gas is created from buried organic material. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 331 Audiopedia
Carbon sink
 
38:45
A carbon sink is a natural or artificial reservoir that accumulates and stores some carbon-containing chemical compound for an indefinite period. The process by which carbon sinks remove carbon dioxide from the atmosphere is known as carbon sequestration. Public awareness of the significance of CO2 sinks has grown since passage of the Kyoto Protocol, which promotes their use as a form of carbon offset. There are also different strategies used to enhance this process. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 752 Audiopedia
Bacteria | Wikipedia audio article
 
49:50
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Bacteria 00:04:11 1 Etymology 00:04:35 2 Origin and early evolution 00:06:21 3 Morphology 00:09:47 4 Cellular structure 00:09:57 4.1 Intracellular structures 00:12:20 4.2 Extracellular structures 00:16:35 4.3 Endospores 00:17:51 5 Metabolism 00:20:46 6 Growth and reproduction 00:24:37 7 Genetics 00:28:08 8 Behaviour 00:28:17 8.1 Movement 00:30:40 8.2 Communication 00:32:11 9 Classification and identification 00:37:29 10 Interactions with other organisms 00:38:09 10.1 Predators 00:38:56 10.2 Mutualists 00:40:41 10.3 Pathogens 00:43:42 11 Significance in technology and industry 00:46:30 12 History of bacteriology 00:49:22 13 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Bacteria ( (listen); common noun bacteria, singular bacterium) are a type of biological cell. They constitute a large domain of prokaryotic microorganisms. Typically a few micrometres in length, bacteria have a number of shapes, ranging from spheres to rods and spirals. Bacteria were among the first life forms to appear on Earth, and are present in most of its habitats. Bacteria inhabit soil, water, acidic hot springs, radioactive waste, and the deep portions of Earth's crust. Bacteria also live in symbiotic and parasitic relationships with plants and animals. Most bacteria have not been characterised, and only about half of the bacterial phyla have species that can be grown in the laboratory. The study of bacteria is known as bacteriology, a branch of microbiology. There are typically 40 million bacterial cells in a gram of soil and a million bacterial cells in a millilitre of fresh water. There are approximately 5×1030 bacteria on Earth, forming a biomass which exceeds that of all plants and animals. Bacteria are vital in many stages of the nutrient cycle by recycling nutrients such as the fixation of nitrogen from the atmosphere. The nutrient cycle includes the decomposition of dead bodies; bacteria are responsible for the putrefaction stage in this process. In the biological communities surrounding hydrothermal vents and cold seeps, extremophile bacteria provide the nutrients needed to sustain life by converting dissolved compounds, such as hydrogen sulphide and methane, to energy. Data reported by researchers in October 2012 and published in March 2013 suggested that bacteria thrive in the Mariana Trench, which, with a depth of up to 11 kilometres, is the deepest known part of the oceans. Other researchers reported related studies that microbes thrive inside rocks up to 580 metres below the sea floor under 2.6 kilometres of ocean off the coast of the northwestern United States. According to one of the researchers, "You can find microbes everywhere—they're extremely adaptable to conditions, and survive wherever they are."The famous notion that bacterial cells in the human body outnumber human cells by a factor of 10:1 has been debunked. There are approximately 39 trillion bacterial cells in the human microbiota as personified by a "reference" 70 kg male 170 cm tall, whereas there are 30 trillion human cells in the body. This means that although they do have the upper hand in actual numbers, it is only by 30%, and not 900%.The largest number exist in the gut flora, and a large number on the skin. The vast majority of the bacteria in the body are rendered harmless by the protective effects of the immune system, though many are beneficial, particularly in the gut flora. However several species of bacteria are pathogenic and cause infectious diseases, including cholera, syphilis, anthrax, leprosy, and bubonic plague. The most common fatal bacterial diseases are respiratory infections, with tuberculosis alone killing about 2 million people per year, mostly in sub-Saharan Africa. In developed countries, antibiotics are used to treat bacterial infections and are also used in farming, making antibiotic resistance a growing problem. In industry, bacteria are important in sewage treatment and the breakdown of oil spills, the production of cheese an ...
Views: 56 wikipedia tts
Abyssal plain
 
30:59
An abyssal plain is an underwater plain on the deep ocean floor, usually found at depths between 3000 and 6000 m. Lying generally between the foot of a continental rise and a mid-ocean ridge, abyssal plains cover more than 50% of the Earth’s surface. They are among the flattest, smoothest and least explored regions on Earth. Abyssal plains are key geologic elements of oceanic basins (the other elements being an elevated mid-ocean ridge and flanking abyssal hills). In addition to these elements, active oceanic basins (those that are associated with a moving plate tectonic boundary) also typically include an oceanic trench and a subduction zone. Abyssal plains were not recognized as distinct physiographic features of the sea floor until the late 1940s and, until very recently, none had been studied on a systematic basis. They are poorly preserved in the sedimentary record, because they tend to be consumed by the subduction process. The creation of the abyssal plain is the end result of spreading of the seafloor (plate tectonics) and melting of the lower oceanic crust. Magma rises from above the asthenosphere (a layer of the upper mantle) and as this basaltic material reaches the surface at mid-ocean ridges it forms new oceanic crust. This is constantly pulled sideways by spreading of the seafloor. Abyssal plains result from the blanketing of an originally uneven surface of oceanic crust by fine-grained sediments, mainly clay and silt. Much of this sediment is deposited by turbidity currents that have been channelled from the continental margins along submarine canyons down into deeper water. The remainder of the sediment is composed chiefly of pelagic sediments. Metallic nodules are common in some areas of the plains, with varying concentrations of metals, including manganese, iron, nickel, cobalt, and copper. These nodules may provide a significant resource for future mining ventures. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1064 Audiopedia
North Cascades National Park | Wikipedia audio article
 
53:14
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: North Cascades National Park 00:03:05 1 Human history 00:03:14 1.1 Paleoindians and Native Americans 00:07:10 1.2 Anglo-European Exploration 00:11:20 1.3 Mining, logging and dam construction 00:14:25 1.4 Establishing the National Park 00:17:14 2 Park management 00:19:34 2.1 Access 00:21:08 3 Geography 00:23:24 3.1 Geology 00:25:32 3.2 Mountains 00:27:53 3.3 Water features 00:29:42 3.4 Glaciers 00:33:12 4 Ecology 00:33:40 4.1 Flora 00:37:27 4.2 Fauna 00:41:27 4.3 Fire 00:43:57 4.4 Climate 00:46:37 4.5 Air and water quality 00:48:18 5 Attractions 00:49:11 5.1 Camping, hiking and bicycling 00:51:17 5.2 Mountaineering 00:52:49 6 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= North Cascades National Park is an American national park in the state of Washington. At more than 500,000 acres (200,000 ha), North Cascades National Park is the largest of the three National Park Service units that comprise the North Cascades National Park Complex. North Cascades National Park consists of a northern and southern section, bisected by the Skagit River that flows through Ross Lake National Recreation Area. Lake Chelan National Recreation Area lies on the southern border of the south unit of the park. In addition to the two national recreation areas, other protected lands including several national forests and wilderness areas, as well as Canadian provincial parks in British Columbia, nearly surround the park. North Cascades National Park features the rugged mountain peaks of the North Cascades Range, the most expansive glacial system in the contiguous United States, the headwaters of numerous waterways, and vast forests with the highest degree of flora biodiversity of any American national park. The region was first settled by Paleo-Indian Native Americans; by the time European American explorers arrived it was inhabited by Skagit tribes. By the early 19th century, the region was visited by fur trappers and several British and American companies vied for control over the fur trade. After the international boundary between Canada and the United States was set at the 49th parallel in 1846, explorers came to chart potential routes through the mountains for roads and railroads. Limited mining and logging occurred from the late 19th century to the early 20th century. The first significant human impact in the region occurred in the 1920s, when several dams were built in the Skagit River valley to generate hydroelectric power. Environmentalists then campaigned to preserve the remaining wilderness, culminating on October 2, 1968, with the designation of North Cascades National Park. Heavy snows and a high risk of avalanches due to the steep terrain, especially on the western slopes, severely limit visitation in the winter. Most access to the park is from State Route 20, which follows the Skagit River, though even this road is closed for months at a time in the winter. Most of the plant and animal species native to the park region are still found there, though climate change and pollutants from industrialized regions to the west pose risks to the environment. The park has one of the earliest and longest lasting research programs dedicated to studying climate change, primarily through examining the effects of glacial retreat. North Cascades National Park is almost entirely protected as wilderness, and so the park has few structures, roads or other improvements. Visitors wishing to drive to a campground must do so in the adjacent national forests or national recreation areas. Camping inside the park requires hiking in by trail, horseback or boat, and camping is regulated by a permit system to ensure the wilderness is not over-exploited. Mountaineering is popular in the park and only unobtrusive clean climbing is allowed.
Views: 20 wikipedia tts
Gold | Wikipedia audio article
 
01:04:39
This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gold 00:02:33 1 Characteristics 00:03:50 1.1 Color 00:05:15 1.2 Isotopes 00:07:08 1.2.1 Synthesis 00:09:05 2 Chemistry 00:12:31 2.1 Rare oxidation states 00:14:37 2.2 Medicinal uses 00:15:25 3 Origins 00:15:34 3.1 Earth's mantle origins 00:16:09 3.2 Celestial origin theories 00:18:35 4 Occurrence 00:21:05 4.1 Seawater 00:22:46 5 History 00:29:36 5.1 Etymology 00:30:29 5.2 Culture 00:32:40 6 Production 00:33:30 6.1 Mining and prospecting 00:36:40 6.2 Extraction and refining 00:38:01 6.3 Consumption 00:38:42 6.4 Pollution 00:40:35 7 Monetary use 00:45:58 7.1 Price 00:47:00 7.2 History 00:50:49 8 Other applications 00:50:59 8.1 Jewelry 00:52:47 8.2 Electronics 00:55:28 8.3 Medicine 00:59:16 8.4 Cuisine 01:00:44 8.5 Miscellanea 01:02:50 9 Toxicity Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "There is only one good, knowledge, and one evil, ignorance." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Gold is a chemical element with symbol Au (from Latin: aurum) and atomic number 79, making it one of the higher atomic number elements that occur naturally. In its purest form, it is a bright, slightly reddish yellow, dense, soft, malleable, and ductile metal. Chemically, gold is a transition metal and a group 11 element. It is one of the least reactive chemical elements and is solid under standard conditions. Gold often occurs in free elemental (native) form, as nuggets or grains, in rocks, in veins, and in alluvial deposits. It occurs in a solid solution series with the native element silver (as electrum) and also naturally alloyed with copper and palladium. Less commonly, it occurs in minerals as gold compounds, often with tellurium (gold tellurides). Gold is resistant to most acids, though it does dissolve in aqua regia, a mixture of nitric acid and hydrochloric acid, which forms a soluble tetrachloroaurate anion. Gold is insoluble in nitric acid, which dissolves silver and base metals, a property that has long been used to refine gold and to confirm the presence of gold in metallic objects, giving rise to the term acid test. Gold also dissolves in alkaline solutions of cyanide, which are used in mining and electroplating. Gold dissolves in mercury, forming amalgam alloys, but this is not a chemical reaction. A relatively rare element, gold is a precious metal that has been used for coinage, jewelry, and other arts throughout recorded history. In the past, a gold standard was often implemented as a monetary policy, but gold coins ceased to be minted as a circulating currency in the 1930s, and the world gold standard was abandoned for a fiat currency system after 1971. A total of 186,700 tonnes of gold exists above ground, as of 2015. The world consumption of new gold produced is about 50% in jewelry, 40% in investments, and 10% in industry. Gold's high malleability, ductility, resistance to corrosion and most other chemical reactions, and conductivity of electricity have led to its continued use in corrosion resistant electrical connectors in all types of computerized devices (its chief industrial use). Gold is also used in infrared shielding, colored-glass production, gold leafing, and tooth restoration. Certain gold salts are still used as anti-inflammatories in medicine. As of 2016, the world's largest gold producer by far was China with 450 tonnes per year.
Views: 27 wikipedia tts