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The Cryptographers’ Panel 2018
 
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Moderator: Zulfikar Ramzan, Chief Technology Officer, RSA Ron Rivest, Institute Professor, MIT Adi Shamir, Professor, Computer Science Department, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel Whitfield Diffie, Cryptographer and Security Expert, Cryptomathic Paul Kocher, Independent Researcher Moxie Marlinspike, Founder, Signal Despite how sophisticated information security has become, it is still a relatively young discipline. The founders of our field continue to be actively engaged in research and innovation. Join us to hear these luminaries engage in an enlightening discussion on the past, present and future of our industry. https://www.rsaconference.com/events/us18/agenda/sessions/11490-The-Cryptographers%E2%80%99-Panel
Views: 6553 RSA Conference
Cryptomathic CTO talks about how quantum computers influence the use of cryptography #PartnersAreKey
 
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In this video Torben Pryds Pedersen, CTO of Cryptomathic, describes how the investment in quantum computers influences the use of cryptography today and why they like working with Utimaco HSMs. Cryptomathic is a global provider of secure server solutions to businesses across a wide range of industry sectors, including banking, government, technology manufacturing, cloud and mobile. With over 30 years' experience, we provide systems for Authentication & Signing, EMV and Crypto & Key Management through best-of-breed security solutions and services. Utimaco is a leading manufacturer of Hardware Security Modules (HSMs) that provide the Root of Trust to all industries, from financial services and payment to the automotive industry, cloud services to the public sector. We keep your cryptographic keys and digital identities safe in order to protect critical digital infrastructures and high value data assets. Our products enable innovations and support the creation of new business by helping to secure critical data and transactions. Utimaco delivers a comprehensive product family of HSMs. Each of our hardware models can be deployed as a general purpose HSM for easy integration into existing software solutions. They can also be customized to enable the development of new solutions. With our professional services, we support our partners to implement their solutions. #PartnersAreKey For more information, please visit: ▸Utimaco HSM: https://hsm.utimaco.com ▸ Cryptomathic: https://www.cryptomathic.com/ ▸LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/utimaco/ ▸Twitter: https://twitter.com/utimaco
Views: 81 Utimaco
The Diffie-Hellman Protocol (ft. Serge Vaudenay)
 
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This video presents the Diffie-Hellman protocol, which is used to set up secure communication channels all over the Internet. It features Serge Vaudenay, full professor of the IC School at EPFL. https://people.epfl.ch/serge.vaudenay ————————————————————————————— New Directions in Cryptography. Whitfield Diffie and Martin Hellman (1976). https://ee.stanford.edu/%7Ehellman/publications/24.pdf 2 Challenges in Cryptography Research (ft. Serge Vaudenay) | ZettaBytes https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ud1-FQVngJA Diffie-Hellman Key Exchange | Jean Goubault-Larrecq https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=996GzLYBYow
Views: 2773 ZettaBytes, EPFL
Boao Forum For Asia: Turing winner Whitfield Diffie on blockchain
 
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Turing Award winner Whitfield Diffie shared his thoughts about the world's blockchain industry and China's role regarding the internet during an interview with CNC on the sidelines of the 2019 Boao Forum for Asia.
Views: 403 New China TV
Stanford Seminar Cryptology and Security: the view from 2017 - The Best Documentary Ever
 
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Cryptology and Security: the view from 2017 - Whitfield Diffie, ACM 2017 Turing Award Support for the Stanford Colloquium on Computer Systems Seminar . ( 1, 2009) Evan Doll provides an overview for the Stanford Computer Science department course, iPhone Application Programming (CS193P). Stanford . In ME 202, Stanford engineering students learn how to turn open-source smartphone operating systems into powerful control of mechatronic devices. In ME 202, Stanford engineering students learn how to turn open-source smartphone operating systems into powerful control of mechatronic devices.
Views: 152 Alfonso Cartwright
Forget Apple vs. the FBI : WhatsApp Just Switched on Encryption for a Billion People
 
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FOR MOST OF the past six weeks, the biggest story out of Silicon Valley was Apple’s battle with the FBI over a federal order to unlock the iPhone of a mass shooter. The company’s refusal touched off a searing debate over privacy and security in the digital age. But this morning, at a small office in Mountain View, California, three guys made the scope of that enormous debate look kinda small. Mountain View is home to WhatsApp, an online messaging service now owned by tech giant Facebook, that has grown into one of the world’s most important applications. More than a billion people trade messages, make phone calls, send photos, and swap videos using the service. This means that only Facebook itself runs a larger self-contained communications network. And today, the enigmatic founders of WhatsApp, Brian Acton and Jan Koum, together with a high-minded coder and cryptographer who goes by the pseudonym Moxie Marlinspike, revealed that the company has added end-to-end encryption to every form of communication on its service : http://goo.gl/ek3IW7
Views: 273 Hamid Fathi
Daily: Bulls run after 6.3 Trillion fund makes "Blockchain Taskforce"
 
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The world's largest asset fund Blackrock reveals that they have a special task force dedicated to cryptocurrencies. Does what does this mean. Coinbase also acquires the pieces necessary to make it list securities tokens. 1:43 Blackrock's Crypto Taskforce https://www.ccn.com/blackrock-the-worlds-largest-asset-manager-is-exploring-cryptocurrencies/ 4:38 Coinbase to become Securities Exchange? https://www.bloomberg.com/amp/news/articles/2018-07-16/coinbase-says-it-has-green-light-to-list-coins-deemed-securities 👍🏻Subscribe to Boxmining for Daily CryptoNews and #Altcoin explainers: https://www.youtube.com/c/boxmining 👑Recommended Exchange - Binance: https://goo.gl/joe55C 🔒Hardware Wallet: https://www.ledgerwallet.com/r/428b 📲Mobile Wallet: https://enjinwallet.io/ Brave Browser: https://brave.com/box831 ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬● Telegram groups: Telegram Discussion Group: https://t.me/Boxdatamining Telegram Announcements: https://t.me/boxminingChannel ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬● ♨️Social: Steemit: https://steemit.com/@boxmining Twitter: https://twitter.com/boxmining Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/boxmining ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬● I'm not a professional financial adviser and you should always do your own research. I may hold the cryptocurrencies talked about in the video. ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬● I talk about: #Bitcoin #Ethereum #Cryptocurrency #Crypto #Altcoins
Views: 18216 Boxmining
DEFCON 19: Federation and Empire (w speaker)
 
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Speaker: Emmanuel Bouillon Security Researcher Federated Identity is getting prevalent in corporate environments. True, solving cross domain access control to Web applications or services is a nagging issue. Today, unsatisfying traditional approaches based on duplicated user accounts or dangerous trust domain relationships are being replaced by neater solutions. One of them is getting more and more popular not only in academic but in corporate environments as well: Claims-based authorization relying on SAML tokens. This cross domain federated Web SSO solution allows applications or service providers to finely control their access while leaving the burden of users management to their authoritative domains. Authoritative domains also keep full control on what they disclose about their users: Very attractive. However most existing material explains developers how to leverage this technology while keeping them oblivious to the underlying protocols or (many) standards' complexity and intricacies. By taking a radically low level approach, API free, this talk is intended to security pen-testers or architects who have to cope with SAML based access control. The just necessary presentation of the standards involved will be given. Then the two main parts will focus on how to adapt existing tool set to be fully operational against SAML access control and to key aspects that need to be considered prior joining or creating such federation. Most of the points are implementation agnostic and can be applied to Shibboleth, SimpleSAMLPHP or Active Directory Federation Service for instance. As well, the presented tools are Burp Pro Extensions leveraging the Buby framework but can be easily be translated into everyone preferred toolset. For more information visit: http://bit.ly/defcon19_information To download the video visit: http://bit.ly/defcon19_videos Playlist Defcon 19: http://bit.ly/defcon19_playlist
Views: 697 Christiaan008
Leslie Lamport, 2013  ACM Turing Award Recipient - Part 1
 
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Dr Lamport begins with how he became interested in computers and how he worked for compute companies during his graduate school years. It was these experiences that led him to consider problems of concurrency. Much of the rest of the interview is concerned with an illustration of the tie-in between his work on algorithms, in particular concurrency algorithms, and the methods that he developed for proving the algorithms correct The two themes were interwoven over most of his career.
Monero (XMR) in a Nutshell
 
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Monero (XMR) is a privacy coin which keeps the sender, receiver and the amount transferred private from prying eyes. In this video, we explore why we need privacy in all our transactions. We explore the function of Ring Signatures, Stealth Addresses and RingCT. and also look at some advantages and disadvantages of Monero. Website: https://getmonero.org/ Ring Signatures: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ring_signature Monero Bug and speedy fix: https://getmonero.org/2017/05/17/disclosure-of-a-major-bug-in-cryptonote-based-currencies.html Monero Support for Ledger: https://support.ledgerwallet.com/hc/en-us/articles/360006352934-Monero-XMR-Advanced-users 👍🏻Subscribe to Boxmining for Daily CryptoNews and Altcoin explainers: https://www.youtube.com/c/boxmining 👑Recommended Exchange - Binance: https://goo.gl/joe55C 🔒Hardware Wallet: https://www.ledgerwallet.com/r/428b 📲Mobile Wallet: https://enjinwallet.io/ Brave Browser: https://brave.com/box831 #Bitcoin #Ethereum #Cryptocurrency #Crypto #Altcoins ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬● Telegram groups: Telegram Discussion Group: https://t.me/Boxdatamining Telegram Announcements: https://t.me/boxminingChannel ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬● ♨️Social: Steemit: https://steemit.com/@boxmining Twitter: https://twitter.com/boxmining Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/boxmining ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬● I'm not a professional financial adviser and you should always do your own research. I may hold the cryptocurrencies talked about in the video. ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬●
Views: 16979 Boxmining
Cryptography
 
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Cryptography is the practice and study of techniques for secure communication in the presence of third parties . More generally, it is about constructing and analyzing protocols that overcome the influence of adversaries and which are related to various aspects in information security such as data confidentiality, data integrity, authentication, and non-repudiation. Modern cryptography intersects the disciplines of mathematics, computer science, and electrical engineering. Applications of cryptography include ATM cards, computer passwords, and electronic commerce. This video targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 245 encyclopediacc
Len Adleman, 2002 ACM Turing Award Recipient
 
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Interviewed about what has influenced him, his life, his research work, and his accomplishments since receiving the Turing Award. More information: http://amturing.acm.org/award_winners/adleman_7308544.cfm
"Restoring Personal Privacy without Compromising National Security" at ACM Turing 50 Celebration
 
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We live in an era of mass surveillance. Private companies monitor our comings and goings, and ad-supported cloud services record and mine our online activities. At the same time, governments have been conducting extensive surveillance in the name of national security. To a large extent, citizens and lawmakers have accepted loss of privacy in exchange for increased security. Can computing technology promote both personal privacy and national security? Panelists will explore how state-of-the-art cryptography, security, networked systems, and data-management technology might enable government agencies to acquire actionable, useful information about legitimate targets of investigation without intruding upon the electronic activity of innocent parties. They will also address the need to use laws and policies in conjunction with technology to hold government agencies accountable for proper use of private information. Moderator: Joan Feigenbaum, Yale University Panelists: Whitfield Diffie (2015 Turing Laureate), Stanford University Bryan Ford, EPFL (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology) Nadia Heninger, University of Pennsylvania Paul Syverson, U.S. Naval Research Laboratory
News: Bancor (Decentralized Exchange) gets hacked for $13 M
 
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👍🏻Subscribe for Daily CryptoNews + #Altcoin explainers: https://www.youtube.com/c/boxmining 👑Recommended Exchange - Binance: https://goo.gl/joe55C 🔒Hardware Wallet: https://www.ledgerwallet.com/r/428b 📲Mobile Wallet: https://enjinwallet.io/ Download the BRAVE browser (No ads, no tracking): https://brave.com/box831 ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬● Telegram groups: Telegram Discussion Group: https://t.me/Boxdatamining Telegram Announcements: https://t.me/boxminingChannel ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬● ♨️Social: Steemit: https://steemit.com/@boxmining Twitter: https://twitter.com/boxmining Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/boxmining ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬● I'm not a professional financial adviser and you should always do your own research. I may hold the cryptocurrencies talked about in the video. ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬● I talk about: #Bitcoin #Ethereum #Cryptocurrency #Crypto #Altcoins
Views: 8265 Boxmining
Blackhat 2012 EUROPE  - KEYNOTE
 
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This video is part of the Infosec Video Collection at SecurityTube.net: http://www.securitytube.net Blackhat 2012 EUROPE - KEYNOTE WHITFIELD DIFFIE Yet Another Look at the State of Security Every day brings another sobering manifestation of cyber-insecurity and another prediction of doom from the invited speakers at our seminars, yet the internet juggernaut keeps juggernauting along. We will take an historical and critical look at the current state of affairs that leaves in its wake a fatalistic optimism.
Views: 8335 SecurityTubeCons
New Kind of Network (NKN) - Building a Decentralized Internet Network
 
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NKN or New Kind of Network aims to rebuild the internet. They want to create the world’s largest exchange for extra bandwidth and have a platform that is truly open, decentralized, dynamic, safe, shared and owned by the community. 0:49 What is NKN 4:48 NKN - Use cases 6:50 The problems that NKN is trying to solve 7:53 NKN and Cellular Automata 9:51 Uses of the NKN token 10:39 Opinions on NKN Disclosure: I have invested in the ICO 👍🏻Subscribe to Boxmining for Daily CryptoNews and #Altcoin explainers: https://www.youtube.com/c/boxmining 👑Recommended Exchange - Binance: https://goo.gl/joe55C 🔒Hardware Wallet: https://www.ledgerwallet.com/r/428b 📲Mobile Wallet: https://enjinwallet.io/ Download the BRAVE browser (No ads, no tracking): https://brave.com/box831 ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬● Telegram groups: Telegram Discussion Group: https://t.me/Boxdatamining Telegram Announcements: https://t.me/boxminingChannel ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬● ♨️Social: Steemit: https://steemit.com/@boxmining Twitter: https://twitter.com/boxmining Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/boxmining ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬● I'm not a professional financial adviser and you should always do your own research. I may hold the cryptocurrencies talked about in the video. ●▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬▬● I talk about: #Bitcoin #Ethereum #Cryptocurrency #Crypto #Altcoins
Views: 12748 Boxmining
Diffie–Hellman key exchange
 
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Diffie–Hellman key exchange (D–H) is a specific method of exchanging cryptographic keys. It is one of the earliest practical examples of key exchange implemented within the field of cryptography. The Diffie–Hellman key exchange method allows two parties that have no prior knowledge of each other to jointly establish a shared secret key over an insecure communications channel. This key can then be used to encrypt subsequent communications using a symmetric key cipher. The scheme was first published by Whitfield Diffie and Martin Hellman in 1976, although it had been separately invented a few years earlier within GCHQ, the British signals intelligence agency, by James H. Ellis, Clifford Cocks and Malcolm J. Williamson but was kept classified. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1006 Audiopedia
Google Internet Summit 2009: Security Session
 
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Google Internet Summit 2009: The State of the Internet May 5, 2009 Security Session panelists are Whit Diffie, Steve Crocker, Chris DiBona, Eric Grosse, and Howard Schmidt. On May 5 and 6, 2009, in Mountain View, we brought together Googlers and leaders from academia and the corporate world for a 2-day summit to discuss the state of the global Internet. The goal of the summit was to collect a wide range of knowledge to inform Google's future plans--from product development and market reach to users' expectations and our ability to keep the Internet open yet secure. More than 30 speakers and moderators led discussions around 8 topics: Networks; Wireless and Sensor Technologies; Security; Standards; Applications; Democracy, Law, Policy and Regulation; Search and Cloud Computing; and The Future. Eric Schmidt, who offered some remarks, expressed optimism that the challenges we face with governments' walling off access to the Internet can be overcome technologically by building networks that are transparent, scalable, and open.
Views: 36944 GoogleTechTalks
Public-key cryptography
 
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Public-key cryptography, also known as asymmetric cryptography, is a class of cryptographic algorithms which require two separate keys, one of which is secret (or private) and one of which is public. Although different, the two parts of this key pair are mathematically linked. The public key is used to encrypt plaintext or to verify a digital signature; whereas the private key is used to decrypt ciphertext or to create a digital signature. The term "asymmetric" stems from the use of different keys to perform these opposite functions, each the inverse of the other -- as contrasted with conventional ("symmetric") cryptography which relies on the same key to perform both. Public-key algorithms are based on mathematical problems which currently admit no efficient solution that are inherent in certain integer factorization, discrete logarithm, and elliptic curve relationships. It is computationally easy for a user to generate their own public and private key-pair and to use them for encryption and decryption. The strength lies in the fact that it is "impossible" (computationally infeasible) for a properly generated private key to be determined from its corresponding public key. Thus the public key may be published without compromising security, whereas the private key must not be revealed to anyone not authorized to read messages or perform digital signatures. Public key algorithms, unlike symmetric key algorithms, do not require a secure initial exchange of one (or more) secret keys between the parties. This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 774 Audiopedia
Data Encryption Standard
 
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The Data Encryption Standard (DES, /ˌdiːˌiːˈɛs/ or /ˈdɛz/) is a previously predominant symmetric-key algorithm for the encryption of electronic data. It was highly influential in the advancement of modern cryptography in the academic world. Developed in the early 1970s at IBM and based on an earlier design by Horst Feistel, the algorithm was submitted to the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) following the agency's invitation to propose a candidate for the protection of sensitive, unclassified electronic government data. In 1976, after consultation with the National Security Agency (NSA), the NBS eventually selected a slightly modified version, which was published as an official Federal Information Processing Standard (FIPS) for the United States in 1977. The publication of an NSA-approved encryption standard simultaneously resulted in its quick international adoption and widespread academic scrutiny. Controversies arose out of classified design elements, a relatively short key length of the symmetric-key block cipher design, and the involvement of the NSA, nourishing suspicions about a backdoor. The intense academic scrutiny the algorithm received over time led to the modern understanding of block ciphers and their cryptanalysis. DES is now considered to be insecure for many applications. This is chiefly due to the 56-bit key size being too small; in January, 1999, distributed.net and the Electronic Frontier Foundation collaborated to publicly break a DES key in 22 hours and 15 minutes (see chronology). There are also some analytical results which demonstrate theoretical weaknesses in the cipher, although they are infeasible to mount in practice. The algorithm is believed to be practically secure in the form of Triple DES, although there are theoretical attacks. In recent years, the cipher has been superseded by the Advanced Encryption Standard (AES). Furthermore, DES has been withdrawn as a standard by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (formerly the National Bureau of Standards). This video is targeted to blind users. Attribution: Article text available under CC-BY-SA Creative Commons image source in video
Views: 1143 Audiopedia
a16z Podcast | The Cloud Atlas to Real Quantum Computing
 
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A funny thing happened on the way to quantum computing: Unlike other major shifts in classic computing before it, it begins -- not ends -- with The Cloud. That's because quantum computers today are more like "physics experiments in a can" that most companies can't use yet -- unless you use software, not just as cloud infrastructure for accessing this computing power commercially but for also building the killer app on top of it. What will that killer app be? With quantum virtual machines and special languages for connecting and trading off classic and quantum computing, companies and developers may be able to help figure that out, not to mention get ahead of this next computing platform (before it surprises them). Ok, sounds great. Only the old rules don't all apply: You have to fundamentally rethink algorithms for quantum computing, just as with previous waves of high-performance computing before it -- from CPU to GPU to TPU and now to QPU. Because as chips evolve, so do algorithms, and vice versa, in an iterative way. But the chicken-egg question of which came first (the algorithm or the specialized hardware for running it?) doesn't matter as much because the answer itself involves herding chickens: "You're trying to get all of these independent processes to run and cooperate with each other to produce an answer and do so in a way that was faster" than the other way before it, observes Jeff Cordova, interim head of software engineering at quantum computing startup Rigetti Computing. "In hindsight, we really care about the statistical model, not watching the entire movie", shares general partner Vijay Pande, based on his own experiences in the world of high-performance computing. In this episode of the a16z Podcast (in conversation with Sonal Chokshi), Cordova and Pande talk all about the realities of engineering -- and using -- the next computing platform beyond scientific research and hardening it into practical, commercial, industrial-scale reality. Luckily, the cloud provides a map to get us there, today.
Views: 25 a16z
1944 in science | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1944_in_science 00:00:09 1 Astronomy 00:00:27 2 Biology 00:01:27 3 Chemistry 00:01:48 4 Computer science 00:02:10 5 Geology 00:02:24 6 History of science 00:02:45 7 Mathematics 00:03:05 8 Medicine 00:03:40 9 Meteorology 00:04:07 10 Physics 00:04:24 11 Technology 00:05:27 12 Awards 00:05:49 13 Births 00:07:30 14 Deaths Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8355629454724193 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= The year 1944 in science and technology involved some significant events, listed below.
Views: 0 wikipedia tts
Peter Wynne Rees on the Property Industry
 
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Introducing RSA Spotlights – taking you straight to the heart of the event, highlighting our favourite moments and key talking points. In this except from the event, Knocking the Corners off the Square Mile, Peter Wynne Rees describes the vision and strategy which transformed the City of London and considers how we reconcile the demands of the property industry with a range of issues in the public interest. Watch the full replay here: http://youtu.be/33e0yvFYf5s
Views: 1272 The RSA
Jewish culture | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: Jewish culture Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Jewish culture is the culture of the Jewish people from the formation of the Jewish nation in biblical times through life in the diaspora and the modern state of Israel. Judaism guides its adherents in both practice and belief, so that it has been called not only a religion, but an orthopraxy. Not all individuals or all cultural phenomena can be classified as either "secular" or "religious", a distinction native to Enlightenment thinking.Jewish culture in its etymological meaning retains linkage to the Jewish people's land of origin, the people named for the Kingdom of Judah, study of Jewish texts, practice of community charity, and Jewish history. The term "secular Jewish culture" therefore refers to many aspects, including: Religion and World View, Literature, Media, and Cinema, Art and Architecture, Cuisine and Traditional Dress, attitudes to Gender, Marriage, and Family, Social Customs and Lifestyles, Music and Dance. "Secular Judaism," is a distinct phenomenon related to Jewish secularization - a historical process of divesting all of these elements of culture from their religious beliefs and practices.Secular Judaism, derived from the philosophy of Moses Mendelssohn, arose out of the Haskalah, or Jewish Enlightenment, which was itself driven by the values of the Enlightenment. In recent years, the academic field of study has encompassed Jewish Studies, History, Literature, Sociology, and Linguistics. Historian David Biale has traced the roots of Jewish secularism back to the pre-modern era. He, and other scholars highlight the Dutch philosopher Baruch Spinoza, who was dubbed "the renegade Jew who gave us modernity" by scholar and novelist Rebecca Newberger Goldstein in an intellectual biography of him. Today, the subject of Jewish secularization is taught, and researched, at many North American and Israeli universities, including Harvard, Tel Aviv University, UCLA, Temple University and City University of New York which have significant Jewish alumni. Additionally, many schools include the academic study of Judaism and Jewish culture in their curricula. Throughout history, in eras and places as diverse as the ancient Hellenic world, in Europe before and after the Age of Enlightenment, in Al-Andalus, North Africa and the Middle East, in India and China, and in the contemporary United States and Israel, Jewish communities have seen the development of cultural phenomena that are characteristically Jewish without being at all specifically religious. Some factors in this come from within Judaism, others from the interaction of Jews with host populations in the diaspora, and others from the inner social and cultural dynamics of the community, as opposed to religion itself. This phenomenon has led to considerably different variations of Jewish culture unique to their own communities.
Views: 228 wikipedia tts
Black Hat EU 2010 - Changing Threats To Privacy: From TIA to Google
 
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By: Moxie Marlinspike We won the war for strong cryptography, anonymous darknets exist in the wild today, and decentralized communication networks have emerged to become reality. These strategies for communicating online were conceived of in anticipation of a dystopian future, but somehow these original efforts have fallen short of delivering us from the most pernicious threats to privacy that we're now facing. Rather than a centralized state-based database of all our communication and movements, modern threats to privacy have become something much more subtle, and perhaps all the more sinister. This talk will explore these evolving trends and discuss some interesting solutions in the works.
Views: 365 Black Hat
List of Massachusetts Institute of Technology alumni | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Massachusetts_Institute_of_Technology_alumni 00:01:36 1 Politics and public service 00:01:47 1.1 United States 00:01:56 1.2 International 00:02:05 2 Architecture and design 00:07:01 3 Business and entrepreneurship 00:07:11 3.1 Computers and Internet 00:16:00 3.2 Engineering 00:19:20 3.3 Manufacturing and defense 00:21:56 3.4 Finance and consulting 00:24:04 3.5 Health care and biotechnology 00:24:51 3.6 Miscellaneous 00:27:53 4 Education 00:37:18 5 Humanities, arts, and social sciences 00:41:06 6 Science and technology 00:59:37 7 Sports 01:00:51 8 Miscellaneous 01:02:40 9 Nobel laureate alumni 01:03:14 10 Astronaut alumni 01:03:24 11 See also Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.7136492096746835 Voice name: en-AU-Wavenet-A "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= This list of Massachusetts Institute of Technology alumni includes students who studied as undergraduates or graduate students at MIT's School of Engineering; School of Science; MIT Sloan School of Management; School of Humanities, Arts, and Social Sciences; School of Architecture and Planning; or Whitaker College of Health Sciences. Since there are more than 120,000 alumni (living and deceased), this listing cannot be comprehensive. Instead, this article summarizes some of the more notable MIT alumni, with some indication of the reasons they are notable in the world at large. All MIT degrees are earned through academic achievement, in that MIT has never awarded honorary degrees in any form.The MIT Alumni Association defines eligibility for membership as follows: The following persons are Alumni/ae Members of the Association: All persons who have received a degree from the Institute; and All persons who have been registered as students in a degree-granting program at the Institute for (i) at least one full term in any undergraduate class which has already graduated; or (ii) for at least two full terms as graduate students.
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Debates of the Century @NYU Wagner: National Security (Featuring Edward Snowden and Fareed Zakaria)
 
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Fareed Zakaria and Edward Snowden debate the question: “Government should have lawful access to any encrypted message or device.” Moderated by Barton Gellman (Senior Fellow at The Century Foundation) Hosted by The Century Foundation (https://tcf.org) and NYU Wagner (http://wagner.nyu.edu/), at the TimesCenter, April 26th, 2016.
Views: 50310 The Century Foundation
Cryptography | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptography 00:03:38 1 Terminology 00:07:53 2 History of cryptography and cryptanalysis 00:08:55 2.1 Classic cryptography 00:16:37 2.2 Computer era 00:19:13 2.3 Advent of modern cryptography 00:21:54 3 Modern cryptography 00:23:02 3.1 Symmetric-key cryptography 00:23:13 3.2 Public-key cryptography 00:23:28 3.3 Cryptanalysis 00:27:58 3.4 Cryptographic primitives 00:34:01 3.5 Cryptosystems 00:40:06 4 Legal issues 00:41:12 4.1 Prohibitions 00:43:02 4.2 Export controls 00:43:12 4.3 NSA involvement 00:45:45 4.4 Digital rights management 00:48:46 4.5 Forced disclosure of encryption keys 00:50:51 5 See also 00:53:36 6 References 00:55:46 7 Further reading Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.8357640430680523 Voice name: en-US-Wavenet-D "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= Cryptography or cryptology (from Ancient Greek: κρυπτός, translit. kryptós "hidden, secret"; and γράφειν graphein, "to write", or -λογία -logia, "study", respectively) is the practice and study of techniques for secure communication in the presence of third parties called adversaries. More generally, cryptography is about constructing and analyzing protocols that prevent third parties or the public from reading private messages; various aspects in information security such as data confidentiality, data integrity, authentication, and non-repudiation are central to modern cryptography. Modern cryptography exists at the intersection of the disciplines of mathematics, computer science, electrical engineering, communication science, and physics. Applications of cryptography include electronic commerce, chip-based payment cards, digital currencies, computer passwords, and military communications. Cryptography prior to the modern age was effectively synonymous with encryption, the conversion of information from a readable state to apparent nonsense. The originator of an encrypted message shares the decoding technique only with intended recipients to preclude access from adversaries. The cryptography literature often uses the names Alice ("A") for the sender, Bob ("B") for the intended recipient, and Eve ("eavesdropper") for the adversary. Since the development of rotor cipher machines in World War I and the advent of computers in World War II, the methods used to carry out cryptology have become increasingly complex and its application more widespread. Modern cryptography is heavily based on mathematical theory and computer science practice; cryptographic algorithms are designed around computational hardness assumptions, making such algorithms hard to break in practice by any adversary. It is theoretically possible to break such a system, but it is infeasible to do so by any known practical means. These schemes are therefore termed computationally secure; theoretical advances, e.g., improvements in integer factorization algorithms, and faster computing technology require these solutions to be continually adapted. There exist information-theoretically secure schemes that provably cannot be broken even with unlimited computing power—an example is the one-time pad—but these schemes are more difficult to use in practice than the best theoretically breakable but computationally secure mechanisms. The growth of cryptographic technology has raised a number of legal issues in the information age. Cryptography's potential for use as a tool for espionage and sedition has led many governments to classify it as a weapon and to limit or even prohibit its use and export. In some jurisdictions where the use of cryptography is legal, laws permit investigators to compel the disclosure of encryption keys for documents relevant to an investigation. Cryptography also plays a major role in digital rights management and copyright infringement of digital media.
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Defcon 19: Panel- Smartfuzzing The Web: Carpe Vestra Foramina
 
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This video is part of the Infosec Video Collection at SecurityTube.net: http://www.securitytube.net https://www.defcon.org/images/defcon-19/dc-19-presentations/Hamiel/DEFCON-19-Hamiel-Smartfuzzing_the_Web_DC.pdf Extra Material: https://www.defcon.org/images/defcon-19/dc-19-presentations/Hamiel/Extras.zip It can be scary to think about how little of the modern attack surface many tools cover. There is no one best tool for the job and on top of that some tools don't do a great job at anything. Often in the hands of general users the capabilities and limitations are not even thought of during testing. Point, click, done. The attack surface of modern web environments as well as their protection mechanisms have become more complicated and yet many tools have not adapted. Hey, Y2K called and it wants some applications tested. There is certainly no shortage of vulnerabilities in modern web environments but we should be looking beyond low hanging fruit at this point. In between fully automated scanners and manual testing lies a sweet spot for the identification of vulnerabilities. Some of the juiciest pieces of information are not found by vulnerability scanners but are found by humans creating custom tests. This is why semi-automated testing space is so important. All of this complicated blending of protection mechanisms, services, and RIA technologies means that moving in to the area of semi-automated testing can be fraught with failure. We detail how these failures can be avoided as well as provide a tool that solves some of these problems as well as provides analysis for your own tools and scripts. Your web applications have moved on, don't you think it's time your tools to do the same? Nathan Hamiel is a Principal Consultant for FishNet Security's Application Security Practice. He is also an Associate Professor of Software Engineering at the University of Advancing Technology. He spends most of his time focusing in the areas of application, Web 2.0, and enterprise security. Nathan has been a speaker at security events around the world including: Black Hat, DefCon, ShmooCon, ToorCon, SecTor, OWASP and many others. He is also a developer of several open source security projects including the pywebfuzz and RAFT. Gregory Fleischer is a Senior Security Consultant in the Application Security practice at FishNet Security. In his spare time, he likes to find and exploit vulnerabilities in web browsers and client-side technologies such as Java and Flash. He has an interest in privacy and anonymity and has worked with The Tor Project to identify potential issues. Justin Engler is a Security Consultant for FishNet Security's Application Security practice. His focus is on the security of web applications, web-backed thick clients (desktop and mobile), databases, and industrial control systems. Justin is currently working on the open source RAFT project. Seth Law Seth Law is a Principal Consultant for FishNet Security in Application Security. He spends the majority of his time breaking web and mobile applications, but has been known to code when the need arises. Seth is currently involved in multiple open source projects, including RAFT. Twitter: @sethlaw
Views: 157 SecurityTubeCons
Canadian artificial intelligence godfathers win Turing Award     BNN Bloomberg
 
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Canadian artificial intelligence godfathers win Turing Award BNN Bloomberg Read more Any violation of policy, community guidelines, copyright law or business cooperation please contact directly by mail us.hotnews20 at gmail.com
Views: 16 DAILY HOT NEWS
Amy Whitaker | Talks at Google
 
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Museum Legs—taken from a term for art fatigue—starts with a question: Why do people get bored and tired in art museums and why does that matter? As Whitaker writes in this humorous and incisive collection of essays, museums matter for reasons that have less to do with art as we know it and more to do with business, politics, and the age-old question of how to live. Maybe the great age of museums will yet be a great age of creativity and hopeful possibility in everyday life.
Views: 53306 Talks at Google
History of women in the United States | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: History of women in the United States Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. You can find other Wikipedia audio articles too at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCuKfABj2eGyjH3ntPxp4YeQ You can upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts "The only true wisdom is in knowing you know nothing." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= This is a piece on history of women in the United States since 1776, and of the Thirteen Colonies before that. The study of women's history has been a major scholarly and popular field, with many scholarly books and articles, museum exhibits, and courses in schools and universities. The roles of women were long ignored in textbooks and popular histories. By the 1960s, women were being presented as successful as male roles. An early feminist approach underscored their victimization and inferior status at the hands of men. In the 21st century writers have emphasized the distinctive strengths displayed inside the community of women, with special concern for minorities among women.
Views: 316 wikipedia tts
Privacy, Technology, and the Modern Self
 
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This talk is part of the semester-long celebration to mark the 100th anniversary of Justice Brandeis’ nomination and appointment to the U.S. Supreme Court. http://www.brandeis.edu/ldb-100 Introduction: Bruce R. Magid, Brandeis University Panel: Moderated by Dan Breen, Brandeis University Anita L. Allen, University of Pennsylvania Commissioned paper: The Declining Significance of Home: Privacy 'Whilst Quiet' and of No Use to Artists or Anyone Shane Harris, The Daily Beast Commissioned paper: Privacy Imperiled: What Would Brandeis Make of the NSA and Edward Snowden? Steven A. Mirmina ’89, NASA Office of the General Counsel, Georgetown University Law School Commissioned paper: Translating Justice Brandeis’s Views on Privacy for the 21st Century Commentator: Marion Smiley, Brandeis University
Views: 313 BrandeisUniversity
List of computer scientists | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_computer_scientists 00:00:38 1 A 00:02:13 2 B 00:06:38 3 C 00:09:04 4 D 00:11:22 5 E 00:12:36 6 F 00:13:38 7 G 00:16:08 8 H 00:19:11 9 I 00:19:33 10 J 00:20:22 11 K 00:22:46 12 L 00:24:29 13 M 00:27:03 14 N 00:29:09 15 O 00:29:39 16 P 00:31:48 17 R 00:33:33 18 S 00:37:55 19 T 00:40:12 20 U 00:40:29 21 V 00:41:37 22 W 00:44:28 23 Y 00:44:50 24 Z Listening is a more natural way of learning, when compared to reading. Written language only began at around 3200 BC, but spoken language has existed long ago. Learning by listening is a great way to: - increases imagination and understanding - improves your listening skills - improves your own spoken accent - learn while on the move - reduce eye strain Now learn the vast amount of general knowledge available on Wikipedia through audio (audio article). You could even learn subconsciously by playing the audio while you are sleeping! If you are planning to listen a lot, you could try using a bone conduction headphone, or a standard speaker instead of an earphone. Listen on Google Assistant through Extra Audio: https://assistant.google.com/services/invoke/uid/0000001a130b3f91 Other Wikipedia audio articles at: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=wikipedia+tts Upload your own Wikipedia articles through: https://github.com/nodef/wikipedia-tts Speaking Rate: 0.9710496945879185 Voice name: en-GB-Wavenet-C "I cannot teach anybody anything, I can only make them think." - Socrates SUMMARY ======= This is a list of computer scientists, people who do work in computer science, in particular researchers and authors. Some persons notable as programmers are included here because they work in research as well as program. A few of these people pre-date the invention of the digital computer; they are now regarded as computer scientists because their work can be seen as leading to the invention of the computer. Others are mathematicians whose work falls within what would now be called theoretical computer science, such as complexity theory and algorithmic information theory.
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Kannada Devotional Songs |  Basava Shri | Kannada Bhakti Songs
 
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Kannada Devotional Songs, Latest Bhakti Songs Kannada, Basava Shri,Kannada Bhakti Songs,Latest Kannada Devotional Songs Latest, Devotional Songs Kannada, Bhakti Songs Kannada, Kannada Old Devotional Songs, New Devotional songs, Kannada Latest Bhakti Songs, Kannada Songs Devotional Rajkumar, Kannada Devotional Songs, God Devotional Kannada songs, Devotional God Songs, only on Lahari Bhakti.
List of publications in computer science | Wikipedia audio article
 
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This is an audio version of the Wikipedia Article: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_important_publications_in_computer_science 00:00:25 1 Artificial intelligence 00:00:34 1.1 iComputing Machinery and Intelligence/i 00:00:58 1.2 iA Proposal for the Dartmouth Summer Research Project on Artificial Intelligence/i 00:01:45 1.3 iFuzzy sets/i 00:02:09 1.4 iProbabilistic Reasoning in Intelligent Systems: Networks of Plausible Inference/i 00:02:33 1.5 iArtificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach/i 00:03:00 1.6 Machine learning 00:03:08 1.6.1 iAn Inductive Inference Machine/i 00:03:42 1.6.2 iLanguage identification in the limit/i 00:04:06 1.6.3 iOn the uniform convergence of relative frequencies of events to their probabilities/i 00:04:34 1.6.4 iA theory of the learnable/i 00:04:55 1.6.5 iLearning representations by back-propagating errors/i 00:05:26 1.6.6 iInduction of Decision Trees/i 00:05:55 1.6.7 iLearning Quickly When Irrelevant Attributes Abound: A New Linear-threshold Algorithm/i 00:06:48 1.6.8 iLearning to predict by the method of Temporal difference/i 00:07:08 1.6.9 iLearnability and the Vapnik–Chervonenkis dimension/i 00:07:36 1.6.10 iCryptographic limitations on learning boolean formulae and finite automata /i 00:08:06 1.6.11 iThe strength of weak learnability/i 00:08:33 1.6.12 iA training algorithm for optimum margin classifiers/i 00:09:08 1.6.13 iA fast learning algorithm for deep belief nets/i 00:09:36 1.6.14 iKnowledge-based analysis of microarray gene expression data by using support vector machines/i 00:10:04 2 Collaborative networks 00:10:42 3 Compilers 00:10:50 3.1 iOn the translation of languages from left to right/i 00:11:34 3.2 iSemantics of Context-Free Languages./i 00:11:58 3.3 iA program data flow analysis procedure/i 00:12:33 3.4 iA Unified Approach to Global Program Optimization/i 00:13:05 3.5 iYACC: Yet another compiler-compiler/i 00:13:28 3.6 igprof: A Call Graph Execution Profiler/i 00:13:58 3.7 iCompilers: Principles, Techniques and Tools /i 00:14:29 4 Computer architecture 00:14:38 4.1 iColossus computer/i 00:15:13 4.2 iFirst Draft of a Report on the EDVAC/isup[5]/sup 00:15:42 4.3 iArchitecture of the IBM System/360/i 00:16:19 4.4 iThe case for the reduced instruction set computer/i 00:16:50 4.5 iComments on "the Case for the Reduced Instruction Set Computer"/i 00:17:11 4.6 iThe CRAY-1 Computer System/i 00:17:48 4.7 iValidity of the Single Processor Approach to Achieving Large Scale Computing Capabilities/i 00:18:13 4.8 iA Case for Redundant Arrays of Inexpensive Disks (RAID)/i 00:18:49 4.9 iThe case for a single-chip multiprocessor/i 00:19:36 5 Computer graphics 00:19:45 5.1 iThe Rendering Equation/i 00:20:04 5.2 iElastically deformable models/i 00:20:39 5.3 iSketchpad, a Man-Machine Graphical Communication System/i 00:20:58 6 Computer vision 00:21:06 6.1 i The Phase Correlation Image Alignment Method /i 00:21:32 6.2 iDetermining Optical Flow/i 00:22:04 6.3 iAn Iterative Image Registration Technique with an Application to Stereo Vision/i 00:22:33 6.4 iThe Laplacian Pyramid as a compact image code/i 00:23:02 6.5 iStochastic relaxation, Gibbs distributions, and the Bayesian restoration of images/i 00:23:33 6.6 iSnakes: Active contour models/i 00:23:51 6.7 iCondensation – conditional density propagation for visual tracking/i 00:24:14 6.8 iObject recognition from local scale-invariant features /i 00:24:39 7 Concurrent, parallel, and distributed computing 00:24:55 8 Databases 00:25:03 8.1 iA relational model for large shared data banks/i 00:25:28 8.2 iBinary B-Trees for Virtual Memory/i 00:25:55 8.3 iRelational Completeness of Data Base Sublanguages/i 00:26:22 8.4 iThe Entity Relationship Model – Towards a Unified View of Data/i 00:26:47 8.5 iSEQUEL: A structured English query language/i 00:27:18 8.6 iThe notions of consistency and predicate locks in a database system/i 00:27:51 8.7 iFederated database systems for managing distributed, heterogeneous, and autonomous databases/i 00:28:27 8.8 iMining association rules between sets of items in large databases/i 00:28:58 9 History of computation 00:29:07 9.1 iThe Computer from Pascal to von Neumann/i 00:29:32 9.2 iA History of Computing in the Twentieth Century/i 00:29:58 10 Information retrieval 00:30:07 10.1 iA Vector Space Model for Automatic Indexing/i 00:30:29 10.2 iExtended Boolean Information Retrieval/i 00:30:50 10.3 iA Statistical Interpretation of Term Specificity and Its Application in Retrieval/i 00:31:22 11 Networking 00:31:30 11.1 Data Communications and Networking 00:32:04 12 Operating systems 00:32:13 12.1 iAn experimental timesharing system./i 00:32:45 12.2 iThe Working Set Model for Program Behavior/i 00:33:14 12.3 iVirtual Memory, Processes, and Sharing in MULTICS/i 00:33:55 12.4 The nucleus of a multiprogramming system 00:34:27 12.5 Operating System Principles 00:34:52 12.6 iA note on the confinement problem/i 00:35:32 12.7 i The UNIX Time-Sharing System/i 00:36:01 12.8 iWeighted voting f ...
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